|  Forgot password?
Easter and Good Friday - Free Sermons & Media Collection »
Home » All Resources » Illustrations » Illustration search: 56 results  Refine your search 

Illustration results for awareness

Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: Trust (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

Companies and ministries that don't deliver trust risk destroying potential customer/constituent goodwill and, ultimately, their businesses or ministries. Those that don't uphold their promises and values undermine brand awareness and constituent loyalty. Marketers build trust in their products, services and organizations by establishing brands that consistently deliver what's promised. That trust can be damaged—even destroyed—in short order if customers/constituents believe they have been deceived. Organizations seen as fundamentally honest and integrity-driven in good times and bad usually are allowed tremendous leeway when they need it—as well as permission to fail, as every organization will do from time to time. (CRM 10/07)

 
Contributed By:
Chris Jordan
 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

"We as individual Christians and collective churches need to recalibrate our sights on the target God has gen us: spiritually lost people. If people matter to God, then they'd better matter to us, too ... Deep in every true Christian, there is an awareness that we are on this planet for purposes greater than having a career, paying the bills, loving our families, and fulfilling our role as upstanding citizens ... God wants us to become contagious Christians - His agents, who will first catch His love and then urgently and infectiously offer it to all who are willing to consider it." (Becoming a Contagious Christian by Bill Hybels).

 
Contributed By:
A. Todd Coget
 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

[Warmth Rather than Light, Citation: Jack R. Van Ens, Leadership, Vol. 8, no. 3.]
People join churches more because they want warmth than light.
We like to think it’s our stunning proclamation of the truth that keeps them in the pews.
Sermons may get them into church the first time, but what keeps them coming are friendships that foster inward awareness and support.

 
Scripture:
none
 

OTHER FAITHS ON HEAVEN

Heaven has many cartographers, and through the centuries many different heavens have been charted. To the variety of celestial landscapes in the West, Islam and Buddhism have raised their own particular paradises: the Koran details a heaven filled with beautiful, large eyed "companions" and youths of perpetual freshness; the sutras speak of a multiplicity of "Buddha fields," pleasant way stations on the journey to Nirvana. Adding to the plenitude, the New Age is now unrolling its own versions of eternity. The best selling author, internationally renowned medium and healer Rosemary Altea, for example, speaks of her vision: "Heaven is not a place; it’s a state of awareness. Heaven is where your heart is, where your soul needs to be."

Muslims have a specific plan of paradise in mind, based on the stories of the Prophet’s miraculous night journey to heaven. rising into the skies on the Buraq, a fantastic creature often described as part woman, part horse, part peacock. Muhammad meets Adam, who resides in the lowest heaven, and Jesus who is only in the 4th level. Abraham welcomes him in the 7th heaven before the Prophet is ushered into paradise for his encounter with God. It was in heaven, according to one tale, that Muhammad, on Moses’ advice, bargained down God’s original demand of 50 prayers a day to 5, the number of times a day each devout Muslim must face Mecca.

Buddhism has as many paradises as there are Buddhas. Each enlightened being has his or her own heaven, a concept probably borrowed from Hinduism, in which gods and goddesses inhabit a series of heavens. The primal heaven, however, was probably the one called Sukhavati, which may itself have borrowed some elements from the florid paradises of Zoroastrian Persia (whence the word pairi-daeza, or enclosure, the origin of our word paradise). As Sakyamuni, the Buddha of our cosmos, teaches, if the denizens of Sukhavati "desire cloaks of different colors and many 100,000 colors, then with these very best cloa...

Continue reading with a Free PRO Subscription...

 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: none (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

In his men’s seminar, David Simmons, a former cornerback for the Dallas Cowboys, tells about his childhood home. His father, a military man, was extremely demanding, rarely saying a kind word, always pushing him with harsh criticism to do better. The father had decided that he would never permit his son to feel any satisfaction from his accomplishments, reminding him there were always new goals ahead.
When Dave was a little boy, his dad gave him a bicycle, unassembled, with the command that he put it together. After Dave struggled to the point of tears with the difficult instructions and many parts, his father said, "I knew you couldn’t do it." Then he assembled it for him.
When Dave played football in high school, his father was unrelenting in his criticisms. In the backyard of his home, after every game, his dad would go over every play and point out Dave’s errors. "Most boys got butterflies in the stomach before the game; I got them afterwards. Facing my father was more stressful than facing any opposing team."
By the time he entered college, Dave hated his father and his harsh discipline. He chose to play football at the University of Georgia because its campus was further from home than any school that offered him a scholarship. After college, he became the second round draft pick of the St. Louis cardinal’s professional football club. Joe Namath (who later signed with the New York Jets), was the club’s first round pick that year. "Excited, I telephoned my father to tell him the good news. He said, ’How does it feel to be second?’"
Despite the hateful feelings he had for his father, Dave began to build a bridge to his dad. Christ had come into his life during college years, and it was God’s love that made him turn to his father. During visits home he stimulated conversation with him and listened with interest to what his father had to say. He learned for the first time what his grandfather had been like-a tough lumberjack known for his quick temper. Once he destroyed a pickup truck with a sledgehammer because it wouldn’t start, and he often beat his son. This new awareness affected Dave dramatically. "Knowing about my father’s upbringing not only made me more sympathetic for him, but it helped me see that, under the circumstances, he might have done much worse. By the time he died, I can honestly say we were friends."

Unfinished Business, Charles Sell, Multnomah, 1989, pp. 171ff

 
Contributed By:
Carl Kolb
 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: none (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

• Do you remember when Magic Johnson announced he had AIDS? He vowed to use that tragedy to promote AIDS awareness. While we might be able to commend him for using his illness for a creative, positive purpose, don’t you think it would have been better for him to stress to young people the real cause of his disease: promiscuity. The real cure is abstinence before marriage and faithfulness in marriage. We don’t need information nearly as much as we need discipline, self-control, and positive examples.

 
Contributed By:
Evie Megginson
 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

Billy Graham’s mother said concerning mother’ day, that she didn’t want to be congratulated. But she wanted it to be a day of soul-searching in her life that she might gain a new awareness of the role that God had given her.

 
Contributed By:
John Hamby
 
Scripture:
none
 

View linked Sermon

Patsy Clairmont in her book “Under His Wings” tells a moving story of the reality of dealing with grief. “We buried my friend’s 26 year old son last week. An accidental gunshot took Jeff’s life. We have more questions than answers. We are offended at people who have all the answers and no experience with devastating loss.
I watched the heart-wrenching scenes as the family tried to come to grips with the tragedy, I can still hear the travailing of the mother’s anguished heart. I can still see the wrenching of the father’s grief torn hands. I can still smell the hospital and funeral home. Memories march before my mind like soldiers, causing me to relive the agony. If it is this difficult for me, Jeff’s god-mother, how much more magnified it must be for his birth mother! I can’t imagine.
As I watched Jeff’s mom, Carol, the week after his death, I observed a miracle. I saw her move from despair to hope. From franticness to peace. From uncertainty to assurance. From needing comfort to extending it.
I witnessed a mom face her worst nightmare and refuse to run away. Instead, she ran to Him. When grief knocked the breath out of Carol, she went to the Breath Giver. I watched as the Lord placed His mantle of grace around her and then supported her with His mercy. The grief process has just begun for Jeff’s loved ones. The Lord will not remove His presence from the Porter family. But there may be moments when He will remove their awareness of His presence. That will allow them to feel the impact of their loss. For He knows it would be our tendency to hide even behind His grace to prot...

Continue reading with a Free PRO Subscription...

 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: none (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

When attendees at a drunk-driving "awareness picnic" saw a woman being given a field sobriety test by police, they gathered around to watch the "demonstration." It wasn’t a demonstration: a police officer saw Linda M. Harris, 53, the coordinator of the Dona Ana County (N.M.) drunken-driving prevention program, drive up, and he smelled alcohol on her breath. A breath test recorded her blood-alcohol level at 0.09 percent, just above the legal limit, and she failed four of five coordination tests. She was arrested in front of the onlookers and charged with driving while intoxicated. (AP) ..."

This Is True, August 5, 2001

 
Contributed By:
Bob Joyce
 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: none (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

Graham Green’s novel, The Heart of the Matter, is about a police officer in a British colony in Africa who becomes involved in a web of intrigue, a sordid affair with a woman, and finally the murder of a trusted assistant. Henry Scobie, the police official, reaches the point that he cannot live with his guilt and despair and decides to take his own life. But before carrying out his plan, he decides to go to church one last time. His purpose in doing so is more to curse God than to pray; but in the Sanctuary, there suddenly breaks in on Scobie the awareness of a God who will not let him go. This amazing persistence causes him to cry out, "How desperately God must love me!"

 
<< Previous
1
...
New Better Preaching Articles
Featured Resource
Today's Most Popular
Sponsored Links