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Illustration results for brotherly love

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WASHINGTON AND MADISON ON GOD'S LAW

James Madison, the primary author of the Constitution of the United States, said this: ’"We have staked the whole future of our new nation NOT upon the power of government; far from it. We have staked the future of all our political constitutions upon the capacity of each of ourselves to govern ourselves according to the moral principles of the Ten Commandments."’

George Washington, appealed to God while he was President
"Almighty God; We make our earnest prayer that Thou wilt keep the United States in Thy holy protection; that Thou wilt incline the hearts of the citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to government; and entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another and for their fellow citizens of the United states at large. And finally that Thou wilt most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility, and pacific temper of mind which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion, and without a humble imitation of whose example in these things we can never hope to be a happy nation. Grant our supplication, we beseech Thee, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen."

(From a sermon by Jeff Strite, A Dream of Freedom, 7/4/2010)

 
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Jason Bonnicksen
 
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THE LIBERTY BELL

One of the most, iconic symbols of our national heritage --the Liberty Bell --hangs magnificently in the city of brotherly love. In 1751, the Pennsylvania Assembly ordered the bell to commemorate the commonwealth's fiftieth anniversary of William Penn's 1701 Charter of Privileges. Penn wrote of the liberties afforded by a people who trust, solemnly profess, and worship --in his words --the "Almighty God being the only Lord of Conscience, Father of Lights and Spirits; and the Author as well as Object of all divine Knowledge, Faith and Worship; and in Jesus Christ, the Savior of the World.

In August 1752, the bell arrived from Britain's shores. However, its rim cracked upon the clapper's first strike. So, two local foundry men, Pass and Stow, offered to recast the bell. Their first attempt did not fare well: the bell sounded horribly, and still it cracked again -- despite their attempts to make the bell stronger. They refused to give up; and as such, the men recast the bell for a third time. Above their names, this declaration from Leviticus 25:10 is inscribed: "Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof."

 
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"In Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, bloodshed; they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love, five hundred years of democracy and peace, and what did they produce? The cuckoo clock"

 
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Eric Peloquin
 
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Erich Remarque’s book, All Quiet on the Western Front tells of a remarkable encounter between two enemy soldiers during the Second World War. During the confusion of an infantry attack a soldier plunged into an out of the way shell hole. There he found a wounded enemy. The sight of the man moved him so much that he gave him a swallow from his canteen. Through this bit of human kindness a certain brotherly bond immediately sprang up between them. The bond became deeper as they tried to chat a bit. The dying man obviously wanted to talk about his wife and children on whom his last thoughts centered. He pointed to his shirt pocket. Understanding the gesture correctly the German soldier extracted a wallet from it and took out a few family pictures. The gaze of the wounded man wandered over them with sadness and infinite love. The German soldier was deeply touched at that; minutes ago he would have stabbed his enemy with his bayonet; minutes ago all of his battle instincts were unleashed, as was natural in an attack. And now one of the enemy lies before him - and is no longer an enemy; he is simply a man, a father and a husband, one who loves and is loved, one who defended his home, and who must now bid farewell to everything he holds dear. All at once the German soldier is confronted by that other man in a completely different way. It suddenly becomes clear that the friend/foe relationship...

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She wasn’t a very impressive woman. She was about five feet tall, in her late 30’s, and wore cheap clothes. She couldn’t read, she couldn’t write, and if she were to smile at you, you would see that her top two front teeth were missing.

She lived alone. She had been married but left her husband when she was 29. She gave him no warning. One day he simply woke up and she was gone.

As for her employment, it varied. Most of the time she took domestic jobs in small hotels: scrubbing floors, making up rooms, and cooking. But a couple of times a year she would disappear for a while, the come back broke looking for work again. When she was working she seemed to work hard, but she was also known to fall asleep on occasion, even if she was in the middle of a conversation. She claimed it was the result of a blow to the head during a fight when she was a teenager.

The woman’s name: Harriett Tubman.

Harriett was born in Maryland in 1820 and started life as a slave. When she was 13 she tried to stop a white overseer from beating another slave, and she took a blow to her head that nearly killed her. Her recovery took months.

When she was 24 she married a man named John Tubman, a free black man. But whenever she talked about escaping to freedom in the north he wouldn’t hear of it. In fact, he said that if she ever tried to leave he would turn her in himself. So when she decided to take her chances and head north, she did so alone, without a word to him. But as far as she was concerned she had a right to one of two things: liberty or death. If she couldn’t have one she’d take the other.

Harriett made her way to Philadelphia, the city of brotherly love, by use of the Underground Railroad… a secret network of free blacks, white abolitionists, and Quakers who helped slaves on the run. The year was 1849.

But the next year, Harriett risked it all when she decided to go back. You see, Harriett had vowed to go back and bring her family out, too. So she started a new life as an Underground Railroad Conductor… someone who would find...

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WASHINGTON'S REQUEST

"I now make it my earnest prayer that God would have you, and the State over which you preside, in his holy protection; that he would incline the hearts of the citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to government, to entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another, for their fellow-citizens of the United States at large, and particularly for brethren who hve served in the field; and finally that he would most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility, and pacific temper of mind, which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion, and wit...

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