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Illustration results for haddon robinson

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Kent Lenard
 
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Haddon Robinson says, "If you want to get rich, invest in victimization. It is America’s fastest growing industry."
He points out that millions of people are getting rich by identifying, representing, interviewing, treating, insuring, and counseling victims.

 
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Richard  McNair
 
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ILL>> A Coloradoan moved to Texas and built a house with a large picture window from which he could view hundreds of miles of rangeland. "The only problem is," he said, "there’s nothing to see." About the same time, a Texan moved to Colorado and built a house with a large picture window overlooking the Rockies. "The only problem is I can’t see anything," he said. "The mountains are in the way."
People have a way of missing what’s right before them. They go to a city and see lights and glitter, but miss the lonely people. They hear a person’s critical comments, but miss the cry for love and friendship.

-- Haddon Robinson

 
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Tags: Peace (add tag)
 
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A young musician’s concert was poorly received by the critics. The famous Finnish composer Jean Sibelius consoled him by patting him on the shoulder and saying, ‘Remember, son, there is no city in the world where they have a statue to a critic. - Haddon Robinson

 
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Lisa Degrenia
 
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Haddon Robinson says it best, "With Him the calf is always the fatted calf; the robe is always the best robe; the joy is always unspeakable; and the peace passes understanding. There is no grudging in God’s goodness. He does not measure His goodness by drops like a druggist filling a prescription. It comes upon in flo...

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Contributed By:
Christian Cheong
 
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Tags: Doubt (add tag)
 
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No Trust or Full Trust - Haddon Robinson
Years ago, Monroe Parker was traveling through South Alabama on a hot day. He stopped at a watermelon stand, picked out a watermelon, and asked the proprietor how much it cost. "It’s $1.10," he replied. Parker dug into his pocket, found only a bill and said, "All I have is a dollar."
"That’s ok," the seller said, "I’ll trust you for it."
"Well, that’s very nice of you," Parker responded, and picking up the watermelon, started to leave.
"Hey, where are you going?" the man behind the counter demanded.
"I’m going outside to eat my watermelon." "But you forgot to give me the dollar!"
"You said you would trust me for it," Parker called back.
"Yeah, but I meant I would trust you for the dime!"
"Sir," Parker replied, "You did not trust me at all. You were just going to take a ten-cent gamble on my integrity!"

You cannot trust Him just a bit!

 
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At the end of World War II, General George S. Patton had the occasion to lament the war’s end in a quiet walk that he took with his friend and mentor General Omar Bradley. He told “Brad” that he actually was sad to see the war ending in Europe and that he would miss the “struggle” and the “dynamics” of warfare. Patton related to Bradley how, although he saw the brutality and vanity of warfare, he had been “born to it” and that was all he had ever known. Bradley tried to console his old friend by suggesting that he continue on in Europe and fight the new battles that would surely be emerging as war-torn Europe struggled to get back on its feet. George wasn’t convinced. “I need to hear the clash of arms and the sound of bugles.” Patton insisted. Bradley then reminded Patton that there was still a war going on in the Pacific and that perhaps General MacAurthur would be needed his help there. Patton shook his head sadly and quietly replied. “No, Brad. Doug would never want me there. That would never happen.” When Bradley asked why Patton smiled and responded. “No, MacAurthur wouldn’t have me. You see, we fought in the same company in World War I; MacAurthur was a captain, and I was his lieutenant. One day our company was commanded to take a hill but our troops were pinned down by enemy artillery. When MacAurthur got the order, he jumped to his feet and charged up that hill urging his men to follow him. I advanced with him step by step all the way to the top.” Then Patton added, “MacAurthur never forgave me for that.” (Haddon Robinson, “Responsible and Dynamic Leadership: A Challenge”)

 
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Haddon Robinson – “Even as pianos need constant tuning and regulating--not only when young and raw, but all through their careers of being used for brilliant concerts--so people who are being used as ‘instruments of righteousness’--or, in other words, living creative, fruitful lives--need constant refreshing, ‘tuning.’

 
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A. Todd Coget
 
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A man went to an asylum for the criminally insane.
He was a bit surprised to find that there were three guards to take care of a hundred inmates.
He said to one of the guards, "Aren’t you afraid that the inmates will unite, overcome you, and escape?"
The guard said, "Lunatics never unite."
Locusts do.
Christians should.
If we don’t, we don’t know where our power...

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Contributed By:
Frederick Baker II
 
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The Coney is a rock badger, a bit larger than the prairie dogs that infect our state of Colorado. Coneys are gray, the color of the rocks. As long as the coney, the rock badger, is on the rock sunning itself, it’s almost impossible to see. When a predator comes to attack, the Coney will run into a hole, the crag in the rock. If a vulture or an eagle wants to sweep down on the coney, it has to knock down a mountain to get at it.
One thing about Coneys, they know where their security lies. If a coney decides to go off on the prairie, venturing away from the rock, then it’s vulnerable. It doesn’t matter how courageous the coney is. It doesn’t matter whether or not it’s been taking body building lessons at the local gym. The most courageous coney falls victim to the smallest wolf or lion. When it wanders away from the rock, a Coney is dead meat.
Biblical writers would have taken that truth, and you know as well as I, they would apply it to God. They would have said, "If you have the wisdom of a badger, you’ll know where your security is. And the security you must have is the security of God himself."

-- Haddon Robinson, "The Wisdom of Small Creatures," Preaching Today, Tape No. 93.

 
Contributed By:
R. David Reynolds
 
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Since 1991 Dr. Haddon W. Robinson has held the Harold John Ockenga Distinguished Professor of Preaching Chair at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. In a poll taken by Baylor University in 1996 he was named one of twelve most effective preachers in the English-speaking world. Writing in the periodical Leadership, vol. 9, no. 3, Dr. Robinson defines covetousness:
“Covetousness is simply craving more of what you have enough already.”

 
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