|  Forgot password?
Easter and Good Friday - Free Sermons & Media Collection »
Home » All Resources » Illustrations » Illustration search: 292 results  Refine your search 

Illustration results for kindness

Contributed By:
Ken Pell
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: Kindness (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

The famous preacher, Charles Swindoll once said, "Kindness is a language that deaf people can hear and that blind people can see."

For more from Chuck, visit http://www.insight.org

 
Contributed By:
Paul Fritz
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

Story of Encouragement:
 
Several months ago when I was seated on the bus at the terminal and going home from work, a woman showed a kindness that up to now I cannot forget.

The bus was still not full. I sat on the third row, by the window, on the driver’s side. It was nearly six p.m. but the driver showed no intention of getting the bus on the road.

I saw a middle-aged woman take a seat at the opposite side. She was crying. Without directly talking to anyone, she continued to cry and tell her story.

She came to the city to visit her daughter and was going back home to the province. On her way to the bus terminal, one of her bags were snatched and stolen from her.

She weepingly narrated that the bag had half of the money she brought with her. The other half was rolled in a hankie and hidden under her blouse so she still had some money left.

The bus conductor, driver and the other passengers all listened to her tale and tried to sympathize with her. Finally, after a few minutes, she stopped and took out some cheese bread from her bag and began to eat. Then I saw an old man in tattered clothes get on the bus and take the seat directly in front of the crying woman.

A few more minutes and all the seats were already taken and the driver got behind the wheel and got ready to move. The bus conductor took out tickets and began asking us where we’re getting off.

When he got to the old man, he got suspicious and asked if the old man had any money with him. The old man said no, but he knew where he was getting off. He said he spent all his money that morning when he accidentally got off the wrong bus.

Upon hearing this, the bus conductor told the old man that he couldn’t possibly ride the bus and ordered him to get off. The old man wouldn’t budge. He was near to crying and he begged the bus conductor to let him take that ride so he could go home. The driver heard what was happening and approached the old man and he, too, told the old man to get off.

The woman was listening and observing what was transpiring. When the bus driver and conductor started to raise their voices at the old man, she interfered. She said, "Stop harrassing him. Can’t you see he’s just trying to go home?"

"He doesn’t have money!" the driver told her in a loud voice.

"Well, that’s not reason enough!" she insisted. "Where will he get off and how much is his fare?"

The bus conductor mumbled the fare.

"Fine," said the woman and she reached between her blouse and took out her only remaining money. She gave it to the bus conductor. "Here’s his fare and mine. I’ll pay for him. It’s only money. Just stop giving him a hard time. Can’t you see he’s old and weak?"

That made all heads turn to the woman. Minutes before, we were watching her cry over the money she lost and now she was paying for the old man’s fare with what’s left of her money. Everyone, including me, felt humbled by the woman’s kindness and unselfishness.

Finally, the bus left the terminal. Not contented to pay for the old man’s fare, she gave him some of her food and a 50-peso bill. She smiled the rest of the trip.

© 2000 Shery Ma Belle Arrieta iamshery@msc.net.ph

 
Contributed By:
Jeff Strite
 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: Heaven (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

Joe Bailey in his book "A View From a Hearse" tells of the day his boy died of cancer. He had returned to the clinic to thank them for their kindness and care of his son. As he spoke to the receptionist, she motioned toward a woman whose son was playing quietly with toys in the waiting area. "He has the same cancer your son had" she said. "Why don’t you go over and see if you can talk with her."
Bailey went reluctantly over to sit next to her and they whispered just out of hearing of the boy. "It must be hard bringing him in for the treatments," he said, more a statement than a question.
"Hard," she turned with anguish in her eyes. "I die everytime I have to bring him in. What makes it worse is that I know it’s not going to stop the cancer and that he’s going to die."
Uncomfortable, Bailey ventured: "Still it is some comfort to know that when that happens there is no more pain and suffering, and that they go to a better place."
"No," hardness in her voice. "When he dies I’m just going to bury him in the cemetery and I’ll never see him again."
Bailey wanted to leave. It was uncomfortable to be reminded of his loss and even more uncomfortable to speak with this woman who obviously had not hope in any way. Then he spoke quietly, "I buried my boy just yesterday, and I’ve only come today to thank the doctors and nurses for their kindness. I know what you’re feeling but I also know that there is a better life for my son now."
"How could you believe such a thing," she challenged.
And then Joe Bailey told her about Jesus.

The hymn writer tells us "I know not why God’s wondrous grace to me he has made known. Nor why, unworthy, Christ in love, redeemed me for His own....
But I know whom I have believed...."

 
Contributed By:
Richard  McNair
 
Scripture:
 

View linked Sermon

Love is the key. Joy is love singing. Peace is love resting. Long-suffering is love enduring. Kindness is love’s touch. Goodness is love’s character. Faithfulness is love’s habit. Gentleness is love’s self-forgetfulne...

Continue reading with a Free PRO Subscription...

 
Contributed By:
Sermon Central Staff
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

WHAT A CONTAGIOUS CHRISTIAN LOOKS LIKE

Bill Hybels, Becoming a Contagious Christian: "Recently, I saw a letter written by a relatively new Christian to the person whose life had influenced hers so greatly. She actually lists about a dozen qualities she found contagious in the life of this older Christian. Listen to some of what she wrote:

'You know when we met; I began to discover a new vulnerability, a warmth, and a lack of pretence that impressed me. I saw in you a thriving spirit--no signs of internal stagnation anywhere. I could tell you were a growing person and I liked that. I saw you had strong self-esteem, not based on the fluff of self-help books, but on something a whole lot deeper. I saw that you lived by convictions and priorities and not just by convenience, selfish pleasure, and financial gain. And I had never met anyone like that before. I felt a depth of love and concern as you listened to me and didn’t judge me. You tried to understand me, you sympathized and you celebrated with me, you demonstrated kindness and generosity--and not just to me, but to other people, as well. And you stood for something. You were willing to go against the grain of society and follow what you believed to be true, no matter what people said, and no matter how much it cost you. And for those reasons and a whole host of others, I found myself really wanting what you had. Now that I’ve become a Christian, I wanted to write to tell you I’m grateful beyond words for how you lived out your Christian life in front of me.'"

(From a sermon by Michael Luke, Discussing the Deacons, 5/5/2011)

 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

A woman was in the process of suing her husband for divorce. She told the judge that she had done her best to get her husband to change his ways, but that he just wouldn’t do it. Referring to Paul’s words about being nice to your enemies, which is found in the 12th chapter of Romans the judge asked the woman if she had tried to "heap coals of fire on his head." The Woman answered, "No, but I don’t think it will work, I’ve already tried scalding water, and that certainly didn’t do any good." In contrast the following story is a good example of the way kindness breeds kindness: "An old man named Bill was hired to sweep streets in a small town in the South. Once a week the street sweeper came by with his brush. Bill was a friendly old fellow and Miss Gidding got into the habit of taking him a glass of lemonade and a slice of cake, during the summer. He always made a point to thank her, but said nothing more. But then one evening she heard a knock at her door. When she went to the door, Bill was standing there with a sack of peaches in one hand, and several ears of sweet corn in the other. He seemed embarrassed as he said, "I brought you these, Ma’am, because you have been so nice to me." Miss Gidding replied, "Oh you shouldn’t have bothered, it was nothing." Then the street sweeper replied, "Well, it’s more than anyone else did for me." If we want people to be kind to us, we must be kind to them.

 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: Endurance (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

At the lake near my home there was an old tree that was truly majestic. It was 70 feet tall and set right at the water’s edge. It provided shade to generations of fishermen and was home to countless squirrels and birds over the years. In the fall its colorful leaves were glorious to gaze upon. By the end of October they had covered the walk path in a thick, crunchy carpet that was a joy to the eye, a pleasure to the nose, and a delight to the ear. This tree was such a wonder to behold. It made the lake and the world a more beautiful place just by being in it.

A few years ago, however, erosion began to take its toll on the ground around the tree. There came a point when the dirt was so worn away by the lake water that it could no longer support the huge roots of this massive beauty and the tree fell to the ground. Amazingly, for the next year it still held on to life. The following Spring with only a few roots still in the ground this tree produced fresh leaves along its fallen limbs. Eventually, though, the tree died and its huge trunk began to slowly decompose. I was saddened by this, but took joy in remembering the beautiful life this tree had lived.

As I was walking around the decaying trunk today, however, I saw something that made my heart sing. Seeds had fallen into it and started to grow. Out of this dead trunk two new saplings were now growing. Even in its death this glorious tree was bringing beauty and life to this world.

May we all live our lives as beautifully as this tree did. May we all live a life that makes the world around us a better place. May we all live a life of such love, such joy, and such light that we touch countless lives with our spirit. May we all live a life of such goodness, such kindness, and such oneness with God that we continue to bring beauty, love, and life to the hearts and souls of others even after we have left this world for the next.

Joseph J. Mazzella

 
Contributed By:
Ronald  Keller
 
Scripture:
 

View linked Sermon

“A little lame boy was once hurrying to catch a train. In the press of the crowd he experienced real difficulty in manipulating his crutches, especially as he was carrying a basket full of fruit and candy. As the passengers rushed along, one hit the basket by mistake, knocking oranges, apples, and candy bars in all directions. The man who caused the accident paused only long enough to scold the cripple for getting in his way. Another gentleman, seeing the boy’’ distress, went to his aid. Quickly he picked up the fruit and added a silver dollar to the collection, saying, ‘I’m sorry, Sonny! I hope this makes up a little!’” With a smile he was on his way. The young boy who had seldom been the recipient of such kindness called after the ‘good Samaritan’ ...

Continue reading with a Free PRO Subscription...

 
Contributed By:
Clark Tanner
 
Scripture:
none

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

In 1973, four hostages were taken in a botched bank robbery in Stockholm, Sweden. At the end of their captivity, six days later, they actively resisted rescue. They refused to testify against their captors, raised money for their legal defense, and one of the female hostages later became engaged to one of her now jailed captors.
The Stockholm syndrome comes into play when a captive cannot escape, is isolated and threatened with death, but is shown token acts of kindness by the captor.

Obviously, this twisted state of the psyche got its name from later studies of these events that transpired in Stockholm. But the same syndrome has since been seen in other situations in life. It is seen in battered wives, survivors of the Holocaust (not many of them left), and like situations.

It basically boils down to this. The victim feels helpless and has lost hope for relief from a situation; gropes for and clings tenaciously to any little perceived goodness or benefit coming even from the person or situation causing the problem, and eventually begins to sense a false love and dedication to the very person or circumstance they’ve been imprisoned to.

 
Contributed By:
MELVIN NEWLAND
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

ILL. Listen to this true story. Rabbi Michael Weisser lived in Lincoln, Nebraska. And for more than 3 years, Larry Trapp, a self-proclaimed Nazi & Ku Klux Klansman, directed a torrent of hate-filled mailings & phone calls toward him.

Trapp promoted white supremacy, anti-Semitism, & other messages of prejudice, declaring his apartment the KKK state headquarters & himself the grand dragon. His whole purpose in life seemed to be to spew out hate-ridden racial slurs & obscene remarks against Weisser & all those like him.

At first, the Weissers were so afraid they locked their doors & worried themselves almost sick over the safety of their family. But one day Rabbi Weisser found out that Trapp was a 42-year-old clinically blind, double amputee. And he became convinced that Trapp’s own physical helplessness was a source of the bitterness he expressed.

So Rabbi Weisser decided to do the unexpected. He left a message on Trapp’s answering machine, telling him of another side of life…a life free of hatred & racism.
Rabbi Weisser said, "I probably called 10 times & left messages before he finally picked up the phone & asked me why I was harassing him. I said that I’d like to help him. I offered him a ride to the grocery store or to the mall."

Trapp was stunned. Disarmed by the kindness & courtesy, he started thinking. He later admitted, through tears, that he heard in the rabbi’s voice, "something I hadn’t experienced in years. It was love."

Slowly the bitter man began to soften. One night he called the Weissers & said he wanted out, but didn’t know how. They grabbed a bucket of fried chicken & took him dinner. Before long they made a trade: in return for their love he gave them his swastika rings, hate tracts, & Klan robes.

That same day Trapp gave up his Ku Klux Klan recruiting job & dumped the rest of his propaganda in the trash. "They showed me so much love that I couldn’t help but love them back," he finally confessed.

Folks, if that could happen in Lincoln, Nebraska, what could happen here in our community, in our neighborhoods, if we truly began to live lives that showed the love of Jesus to those around us?

 
<< Previous
1
...
New Better Preaching Articles
Featured Resource
Today's Most Popular
Sponsored Links