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Illustration results for parable good samaritan

Contributed By:
Mary Lewis
 
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We’ve probably all heard the expression, “This separates the men from the boys!” What kinds of things separate the men from the boys? Things that involve danger and risk. Things that take courage and a willingness to sacrifice. Things that are grueling and gut-wrenching. Things that require maturity and perseverance, not just boyish enthusiasm and energy.

In a sense, that’s what this parable (the Good Samaritan) teaches about the Christian life. Jesus isn’t separating the men from the boys, He’s separating the real Christian from the merely religious.

 
Contributed By:
Martin Dale
 
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One man I admire greatly is Maximilian Kolbe (1894-1941)

Maximilian Kolbe was a Catholic priest, who was put in a Nazi concentration camp for his faith.

On May 28, 1941, he was transferred to the concentration camp at Auschwitz.

During his time there, he would share his meagre rations of food with those around him who were hungry.

Despite the evil in the camp perpetrated against the inmates, Kolbe pleaded with the prisoners to forgive their persecutors and overcome evil with good.

A protestant doctor who treated the patients in Kolbe’s block said that Kolbe would not let himself be treated before any other prisoners in that block.
He sacrificed himself for the other prisoners. The doctor said about Kolbe:
"From my observations, the virtues in the Servant of God were no momentary impulse such as are often found in men, they sprang from a habitual practice, deeply woven into his personality."

One day a man in Kolbe’s block escaped. All of the men from that block were brought out into the hot sun and made to stand there all day with no food or drink.

At the end of the day, the man that had escaped was not found and so Fritsch, the Nazi commandant told the prisoners that ten men would be selected to die in the starvation cell in place of the one that had escaped.
One man, a polish sergeant (Francis Gajowniczek) was one of those selected. He begged to be spared because he was worried that his family would not be able to survive without him.

As he was pleading with the commandant, Maximilian Kolbe silently stepped forward and stood before the commandant.

The commandant turned to him and said asked, "What does this Polish pig want?"

Kolbe pointed to the polish sergeant and said, "I am a Catholic priest from Poland; I would like to take his place, because he has a wife and children."

The commandant stood silent for a moment in disbelief.
He then allowed the sergeant to go back to his place in the ranks and Kolbe took his place in the starvation bunker.

Each day the guards removed the bodies of those who had died.

However instead of the usual sounds of screaming, all they could hear was the sounds of Kolbe and the others in the bunker singing hymns and praying.

When Kolbe couldn’t speak any longer due to hunger and lack of energy, he would whisper his prayers.
After two weeks, the cell had to be cleared out for more prisoners. Only four prisoners were left and Kolbe was one of them.

The guards injected each with a lethal injection and on August 14, 1941, Kolbe paid the ultimate price.
Kolbe viewed others as more important than himself. And in that he was following the Master.

 
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FAMOUS NEIGHBORS

Can you name some famous neighbors?
*Mr. Rogers Neighborhood in his sweater and sneakers … “It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood … won’t you be my neighbor?”
*Dennis the Menace … “Helloooo Mr. Wilson!”
*Ricky & Lucy Ricardo … Fred & Ethel Mertz.
*Tim “the Tool Man” Taylor … Wilson.

Have you ever had trouble with a neighbor?

The story of the Good Samaritan is about neighbors, and it has all the elements of a movie: violence … crime … racial discrimination … hatred … neglect … unconcern … love … mercy.

Who says the Bible isn’t relevant to the modern world?

SOURCE: Ray Scott in “The Good Samaritan” on SermonCentral.


 
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THE COMPASSIONATE CATCH

On Aug. 8, 2004, the Vietnamese community of Westminster, California, celebrated one of the kindest and bravest acts performed by a stranger on them. On Nov. 13, 1985, ninety-six Vietnamese refugees despaired for their lives and their families' lives when the engine of the boat carrying them across the South China Sea went dead. The boat people crammed onto the rickety boat could see a tropical storm headed their way. For four days they had watched the ships passed: 1, 2, 3, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, but none would stop to rescue them.

When the 51st ship passed, the refugees waved, screamed, and clamored in vain. The South Korean fishing ship traveled on but turned around 10 minutes later to save them. On board the ship, Jeon, a captain employed by Koryo Wonyang Corporation for 16 years, was returning from the Indian Ocean with 25 sailors and more than 350 tons of tuna.

As Jeon’s ship, the Kwang Myung 87, approached them, the captain could see the dire straits the people were in. He called the sailors together because it was against company policy to pick up boat people, but Jeon told them he’d take responsibility. The sailors told Jeon they were with him.

Only years later did the refugees know what had happened to Jeon. The shipping company fired him for picking up the boat people against the company’s rules. He couldn’t find another captain’s job and survived through his savings and by helping out at friends' businesses.

On Aug. 8, 2004, nineteen years after the dramatic boat rescue, hundreds of people in the Vietnamese community of Westminster paid back a debt they can never repay. They honored the ship’s captain, Je Yong Jeon, after survivor Peter Cuong Nguyen managed to track him down....

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STORY: Saint Peter was at the gates of Heaven interviewing a man. He said, “You haven’t done anything bad, but you haven’t anything good either. If you tell me just one good thing that you’ve done, I’ll let you in.” “Well, the man replied, “I was traveling on the road when I saw a group of thugs robbing a woman. So I went up to them and shouted for them to stop. Unfortunately, things got a little out of hand and I ended up punching out their leader. Then I challenged everyone else in the group to fight me.” “Wow,” Saint Peter said. “That IS good. When did it happen?” “About 2 minutes ago.”

 
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The Good Samaritan has lived in memory for centuries without a name.

 
Contributed By:
Darian Hybl
 
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Recently I read an article that convicted me of my ‘blind spots’ where I have not wanted to ‘cross the road’ or enter deeper into relationship. Alex Early penned an article entitled, “A Pastor Walked into a Gay Bar And…” At first I avoided the article because I thought this article was more a joke than anything, but upon reading the article it epitomized the Good Samaritan story. While in school expecting to get a job in a few years as a college professor, Alex took a job in a local bar sweeping floor, stocking the beer and generally doing what one has to do to survive with a wife and family. Prior to taking the position he prayed about this occupation and what God could do through him. Through his own and his wifes discernment they felt this was where God was calling him to work.

The bar he be began to work in wasn’t a classy joint in town. It was known as a ‘gay bar’. Alex didn’t take the job to ‘convert’ everyone he met, God had given him a different mission. It was to be a ‘a friend of drunkards and sinners’. This realization only came through his reading, studying and believing the scriptures of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Ultimately Alex’s interactions with the patrons opened up many opportunities to share the gospel in the most unconventional way. It wasn’t to ‘beat them over the head with the Gospel’ or to judge them for their lifestyle, attitudes or how they led their lives. Alex knew who the real judge was, God the Father, Alex’s role also was not to portray himself as the ‘perfect follower’, but as someone who was approachable and willing to walk broken, but also call them his friends. This non-judgmental and open approach allowed the true Gospel of Jesus Christ to not only be shared, but lived out in a gay bar that shared the true message of salvation for all mankind. It showed how he could cross the road and minister to a complete stranger like the Good Samaritan and bind up wounds of bitterness and hatred that had previously been levied at Christians and now bring new meaning and understanding to what true relationship could be when following Jesus Christ Gospel call in his life.

Adapted from Article
A Pastor Walks into a Gay Bar And
By: Alex Early
http://www.churchleaders.com/outreach-missions/outreach-missions-articles/169289-alex-early-gay-and-the-gospel.html?print

 
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A NEIGHBOR ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WORLD

Pastor David Jeremiah tells a story about Bob Pierce.
Pierce had advanced leukemia. But he went to visit a friend in Indonesia before he died. As they were walking through a small village, they came upon a young girl lying on a bamboo mat next to a river. She was dying of cancer. And she only had a short time to live.

Bob was upset. He said, "Why isn’t she in a clinic? Why
isn’t someone taking care of her?" But his friend explained that she was from the jungle. And she wished to spend her last days next to the river, where it was cool and familiar.
As Bob gazed at her, he felt such compassion that he got
down on his knees in the mud, took her hand, and began
stroking it. Although she didn’t understand him, he prayed for her.

Afterward she looked up and said something. "What did she
say?" Bob asked his friend.
His friend replied, "She said, ’If I could only sleep again, if I could only sleep again.’"

Bob began to weep. Then he reached into his pocket and
took out his own sleeping pills, the ones his doctor had given him because the pain from his leukemia was too great for him to sleep at night.

He handed the bottle to his friend. "You make sure this
young lady gets a good night’s sleep," he said, "as long as these pills last."

Bob was ten days away f...

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Contributed By:
Otis McMillan
 
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THE GOOD OUTCAST-LONGHAIR-BIKER

Now it came to pass that a certain man was traveling Lonesome Street, a lonely and dark road from Tom's Tavern to Bill's Bar. After many visits to this bar, the consumption of liquor got a hold of him, stripped him of all his goods and left him destitute and dying on Skid Row. There came that way a certain respected religious leader, a bishop in the church. He saw the drunk with a bleeding skull and vomit covering his clothes. Deciding he was too drunk to talk to about his soul, he thought society should do something to prohibit such drunkenness. He passed by on the right as far and as fast as possible.

Soon a social worker, whose training taught him how to care for persons with all kinds of social and personal problems, came that way. He saw the man stretched out on the sidewalk. He looked at him, but concluded that the man was beyond help or hope, he straightway continued on his way.

After some time, an outcast of society, a longhaired motorcycle rider came down Lonesome Street. Though despised by respectable people and watched with suspicion by the police, the biker saw the dying drunk. He came where he was and called a fellow longhaired biker to help him. He spoke soothing words, lifted the man in his arms, and took him to a place where he knew the man would receive care. Now who was the neighbor?

 
Contributed By:
Rodelio Mallari
 
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THREE PHILOSOPHIES: THE GOOD SAMARITAN

The parable of the Good Samaritan gives three philosophies of life—

The robber's philosophy was "What you have is mine, and I will take it."

The priest and Levite had the philosophy that "What is mine is mine, and I will keep it."

The Samaritan's philosophy was "What is mine is yours, and I will share it."

Jesus endorsed the Samaritan's philosopher and said, "Go, and do thou likewise." (Luke 10:37)

— Encyclopedia of 15,000 Illustrations

 
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