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Illustration results for partnerships

Contributed By:
Bruce Howell
 
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A missionary was seated on a plane next to a well-dressed young man and they soon began conversing. The missionary asked him what he did for a living. He answered, “I’m in big business.” “So am I,” replied the missionary. With that the young man remarked, “I cover the entire U.S. with my business.” “Well,” said the missionary, “I’ve traveled all over the world in connection with mine.” The young man continued: “I’m in partnership with my father. He’s a millionaire.” The missionary smiled and said, “I, too, am in partnership with my Father. He’s a multimillionaire.” The young man said, “We have representatives in most states.” The missionary replied, “We have representatives in almost every country in the world.” By this time the young man looked at the missionary and said, “What sort of business are you in, anyway?” When the missionary explained, the young man said, “Sir, you’re not just in big business. You’re in the biggest!”

 
Contributed By:
William Jewett
 
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F.B. Meyer wrote about two Germans who wanted to climb the Matterhorn. They hired three guides and began their ascent at the steepest and most slippery part. The men roped themselves together in this order: guide, traveler, guide, traveler, guide. They had gone only a little way up the side when the last man lost his footing. He was held up temporarily by the other four, because each had a toehold in the niches they had cut in the ice. But then the next man slipped, and he pulled down the two above him. The only one to stand firm was the first guide, who had driven a spike deep into the ice. Because he held his ground, all the men beneath him regained their footing. F.B. Meyer concluded his story by drawing a spiritual application. He said, "I am like one of those men who slipped, but thank God, I am bound in a living partnership to Christ. And because He stands, I will never perish."

 
Contributed By:
Jim Luthy
 
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Gary Thomas commented, "I don’t believe couples fall out of love—they fall out of repentance." ("Putting Yourself Last" Marriage Partnership, Winter 1999).

 
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Excellent Congregations: Excellent Protestant Congregations, by Paul Wilkes and published by Westminster John Knox Press identified the following 26 common traits among the "excellent" protestant congregations.
1. A vibrancy about living a Christian life...living on the creative and holy edge of the New Testament...being a Christian is not a leisure activity but an adventure.
2. Entrepreneurial...risk-takers, self-starters, use what works and put aside that which does not.
3. Draws philosophically, rather than geographically or denominationally, by the spirit of a living and present God.
4. Reach beyond their comfort zone...not afraid of being uncomfortable and ask tough questions of themselves.
5. Regularly evaluate themselves...for effectiveness.
6. Have a clear, yet changing, sense of mission...a vision of where they want to be and willingness to redirect energies to be effective in their community and people’s lives.
7. Willingness to break up and reassemble...put aside old structures and coalitions when necessary to move forward.
8. Unafraid of being vulnerable and making mistakes.
9. Laity are integral in leadership...competence and a desire to serve, the ability to learn, the humility to admit mistakes and the courage to continue despite setbacks are more important prerequisites for leadership than formal training and ordination.
10. Preach and practice forgiveness and acceptance.
11. Relationship evangelism...personal contact is the key...most new people come to the church through word of mouth...friend, co-worker and neighbor.
12. See themselves as a unique community...not as a franchise of their denomination or even Christianity.
13. In transforming the culture, hold government, agencies and institutions accountable...see their work as not only serving their constituency but also transforming the world around them.
14. Believe in partnerships with other churches, agencies and interest groups.
15. Offer an ascent to God, a relationship...provide the tools and support to forge a real, living and enduring relationship with God.
16. Traditional without being traditionalist...their tradition is a beginning, a springboard, not a wall, not a barrier.
17. The Bible is at their core.
18. Innovative about different spiritual approaches.
19. Tailor liturgies and programs to various constituencies...reject one-size-fits-all approach.
20. Powerful, life-situation preaching...pa...

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Contributed By:
A. Todd Coget
 
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Marriage is a lifetime covenant: one man, one woman, under God.

[The Lifetime Covenant of Marriage, Citation: Elizabeth Cody Newenhuyse, Marriage Partnership, Vol. 9, no. 4.]

 
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On Managing Growth: John Chambers, President of Cisco Systems, the 3rd most valuable company in the world, has this advice for managing growth:
· Make your customers the center of your culture. Tie employee compensation programs directly to customer satisfaction results.
· Empower every employee. It will increase productivity and improve retention.
· Thrive on change.
· Teamwork requires open, two-way communications and trust.
· Build strong partnerships.
· Realize competition is good-it will make you better.
(WSJ 6-1/00)


 
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The 10 Essentials of a successful Consumer Direct business:
· Success depends on operating in and integrating all channels.
· Targeted communications and partnerships will be more successful than mass marketing.
· Older consumers can be won through younger family members.
· Brands are power, but one is enough.
· Product brands rule; retail brands must build 1-to-1 relationships
· Bricks-&-mortar retailers are limited by distance. Con-sumer Direct retailers can cherry-pick customers.
· Technology investments are critical to automating the process and enabling the personal touch.
· Consumers should always have the option of reaching a real person.
· Being the consumer’s agent enables the ultimate Learning Relationship.
· Final-mile logistics will make or break business models; get it right, or partner early. (1 to 1 magazine 3/01)



 
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There is nothing more poignant than considering the end of things. Whenever we experience the end of things it helps us consider what is really important. I was struck this week by John Piper’s journal entry: He recounted as he sat beside the bed of his father keeping a vigil. He monitored his breathing, he prayed aloud into his ear with Bible texts and pleadings to Jesus to come and take him. For Piper, he said that he felt an unusual sense of partnership with his father as he pressed on the Lord to relieve his father, this warrior of his burden. He thanked God that his father is not suffering but quietly going home. His breathing stopped. Nothing more. He stroked his fathers head and sang: “My gracious Master and My God Assist me to proclaim To spread through all the earth abroad The honors of thy name”. His journal entry then recounted the faithfulness of his father: “Daddy, how many thousands awaited you because of your proclamation of the great gospel. You were faithful. You kept the faith, finished the race, fought the fight. “Make friends for yourselves with unrighteous mammon that they might receive you into eternal habitations.” Piper called the rest of his family His final words were: “Thank you, Daddy. Thank you for sixty-one years of faithfulness to me. I am simply looking into his face now. Thank you. You were a good father. You never put me down. Discipline, yes. Spankings, yes. But you never scorned me. You never treated me with contempt. You never spoke of my future with hopelessness in your voice. You believed God’s hand was on me. You approved of my ministry. You prayed for me. Everyday. That may be the biggest change in these new days: Daddy is no longer praying for me. I look you in the face and promise you with all my heart: Never will I forsake your gospel. O how you believed in hell and heaven and Christ and cross and blood and righteousness and faith and salvation and the Holy Spirit and the life of holiness and love. I rededicate myself, Daddy, to serve your great and glorious Lord Jesus with all my heart and ...

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The American Bible Society and the Gospel Music Association (GMA) have formed a partnership to create a new songwriting competition at GMA’s annual Music in the Rockies, held in Estes Park, CO. Songwriters are encouraged to adapt, derive or base music on Scripture from both the Old and New Testaments. The prizes will include a track on an ABS recording project to be released by a major record label and distribution company. (Christian e-Tailing 10/18/07)

 
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There are approximately 20 million sole proprietorships and partnerships and 5.2 million micro-businesses in the U.S. (from Gary Foster)

 
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