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Illustration results for perplexity

Contributed By:
David Fox
 
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C.H.Mackintosh wrote: “There is power in the presence of a risen Savior to solve our difficulties, remove our perplexities, calm our fears, ease our burdens, dry our tears, meet our every need, tranquilize our minds and satisfy every craving of our hearts.”

 
Contributed By:
Ray Navarro
 
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It was a dark and stormy night.

You could hear the thunder in the distance. Bats flapped their wings in the darkness of the night.
There the castle stood. The wolves were howling; the trees were swaying in the wind as it whistled.

And inside the castle, a faint light shown…from a laboratory.

This was the laboratory of the one and only, the maddest
scientist of them all…the laboratory of the infamous Dr. Emil Van-Gelical!

A rat ran across the granite floor as a daunting figure appeared in the light. It was Dr. Van Gelical himself with his white laboratory coat stained with the evidence of his notorious experiements.

His eyes were glowing with mad delight as he gazed upon the table in the middle of the room, covered with a white sheet.

Under the sheet lay a human-like form.

Suddenly, Dr. Evan Gelical shouted:

"Igor, come quickly! We have much to do!"

Irregular footsteps were heard coming down from the stairs.
In a moment appeared Igor, a hunchback with tattered clothes and a candelabrum in one hand and a big cardboard box in the other.

"Yes master…here is everything you ordered. All is ready!"

"Very good. Bring all the materials to the table Igor. Now we begin….the experiment!

Thunder was heard in the distance while Igor dragged the box towards the table.

"Tonight I will conduct the greatest experiment of my career. Tonight shall be my greatest triumph ever!"

Doctor Evan Gelical raised his fist towards the sky:
"I shall achieve what no man has achieved before. Tonight I create spiritual life! This shall be my greatest hour for I shall create….Christianstein!"

More thunder and lightning.

"They say that I am mad Igor. But Christianstein shall be the greatest specimen of spiritual life the world has ever seen! He shall everything Igor, EVERYTHING!"

"The moment has arrived. Igor, y gloves!."

"Yes master."

"Give me the voice of a great evangelist Igor!"

"Yes master" and he handed him a jar from the box.

"The courage of Stephen!" Igor produced a disty vial.

"The patience of Job!" the doctor commanded and he was rewarded with an ancient-looking flask.

"Now the hypodermic and the serums I distilled!"

Igor’s hands trembled as he presented a long, steel syringe and bottles filled with different colored fluids.

"Double dosis of daily prayer and Bible reading,"
murmured Dr. Evan Gelical while he withdrew liquid from one of the bottles and injected it into the lifeless figure’s arm.

"Then faithful church attendance…generous giving…temperance…volunteer work…ability to resist temptation…witnessing…"

The doctor paused for a moment, then filled the syringe with fluid from the final container.

"And last-but not least-a triple injection of …orthodoxy!

The mad doctor consulted his list once more.

"Examine the box Igor. Have we forgoteen anything?"

"Oh no master…Everything must be in place!"

"Excellent! This is the moment the world has waited for. This is the moment for….Christianstein!"

The doctor dashed to the nearest wall where an electical control panel waited.

"A million volts of lightning will bring my creation to life. Now stand back Igor while I throw the power switch…and prepare to meet the perfect Christian…CHRISTIANSTEIN!"

Doctor Emil Van Gelical threw the massive switch as an avalanche of thunder shook the castle.

The figure began to tremble.

"Doctor! shouted Igor…it’s….moving!

"Yes, yes, my creation lives!

That thing called "CHRISTIANSTEIN" sat up slowly. Then, stiffly, it climbed from the table and stood to its full height.

"Oh, my creation…..Speak to me, speak to me!"

The figure looked down at the doctor and frowned. Finally it began to speak in a low and hostile growl:

"If I speak in the language of angels but have not love…"

"LOVE?" asked the doctor, examining in perplexity his list once again.

Slowly the creature lifted his hands towards the doctor who was still consulting his list.

"If I have the gift of prophecy and can understand all mysteries and all knowledge and if I have faith that can move mountains and have not love…."

"LOVE?" Igor, what is he talking about?"

"I, I don’t know master! answered Igor as he hid himself under the table.

"If I give all my possessions to the poor and give my body to the flames to be burned and have not love…" Suddenly the figure, growling, picked up the doctor by his coat off of his feet…."I gain nothing!"

"Nothing?" said the doctor.

"¡Aaarrggghhh!" the creature bellowed throwing the doctor to the ground and reaching for his throat.

"Igor you fool! I knew that we forgot something! And such a small thing!" while the doctor fled for his life with the creature CHRISTIANSTIEN in hot pursuit.

A few minutes passed before Igor finally had enough courage to come out from under the table. Finally, looking this way and that, he whispered:

"I, I think….we have created a monster!"

 
Contributed By:
Paul Fritz
 
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Writing about God’s sure guidance, British pastor Frank W. Boreham recounted a time when a minister visited his home in New Zealand. Being young and inexperienced, Boreham sought the counsel of his guest. He said that one morning they were sitting on the veranda, looking out over the golden plains to the purple sunlit mountains. He asked the minister, "Can a man be sure that in the hour of perplexity he will be rightly led by God? Can he feel secure against making a false step?" "I am certain of it," exclaimed the minister, "if he will but give God time! As long as you live, remember that. Give God time!"

Tim LaHaye, How to Study the Bible for Yourself, Harvest House, pp. 95-96.

 
Contributed By:
Randy Aly
 
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The storm was raging. The sea was beating against the rocks in huge, dashing waves. The lightning was flashing, the thunder was roaring, the wind was blowing; but the little bird was sound asleep in the crevice of the rock, its head tucked serenely under its wing. That is peace: to be able to sleep in the storm! In Christ we are relaxed and at peace in the midst of the confusions, bewilderments, and...

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Contributed By:
Manuel Amparo
 
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The western heavens were alight with the soft afterglow of the long summer day. The last stirrings of the afternoon sea wind murmured drowsily in the moss-hung maples along the drive. Inside the old house, a small fire burned slowly on the stone hearth, while above it, comfortably set on the wide mantel, the family clock pointed to ten minutes to bedtime.

At his grandmother’s knee, the little man of four was enjoying his evening adventure with pencil and paper. For half an hour the two of them had been drawing figures, letters, numbers, and words. Finally grandmother took the pencil and paper. Carefully she spelled out and wrote down the letters of her grandson’s name—Floyd.

Then, turning the pad, she handed the pencil back to the boy and said, “There! That’s your name. Now you write it. Make each letter just like the one above it. Go ahead. Try.”

The brown-eyed lad looked up into his grandmother’s face with childish perplexity and hesitancy. His eager face twisted into a lovable pattern of self-distrust.

“N-o-o-o-o,” he confessed innocently. “N-o-o-o-o, grandma. I can’t. I can’t do it. My pencil goes wrong. I can’t make it go where it’s supposed to go.”

Lovingly, grandma drew him close. Patiently she put the pencil between the thumb and forefinger of his right hand. Then, placing her own right hand over his, she drew out the letters, line by line, curve by curve, naming each of the letters in turn.

“There!” she exclaimed when she had finished. “You wrote your name. F-l-o-y-d.”

A look of wonder and joy came into the lad’s face. “I did, grandma? I did? Did I write my name?”

Then the full truth burst upon him and he became exuberant. “I did it! You held my hand and I wrote my name!”

Across the room grandpa had laid his paper aside and was watching and listening. The scene before him was so simple, the lesson it illustrated so profound. Weeks later it was still in his mind.

How like the little boys we are, each and every one of us! Little boys of four, standing as it were at our grandmother’s knee, fascinated with the letters and figures of life. Fascinated and inept and just a wee bit afraid.

We have the pattern before us. We take the pencil in our hands. We make our marks on the clean page. But, alas! How poorly they resembled the neat letters above! How uncontrolled our “a’s”! How misshapen our “b’s”! How unintelligible our “c’s”! What scrawlings we make at best, when we make them ourselves. How unlike the divine Pattern we are when we attempt to live His life in our own strength and wisdom!

What we need—indeed, what we must have—is a hand to hold ours as we work out our lines and curves on the page of life.

It is our fingers that hold the pencil. But it is the hand of Christ, holding our hands, that directs the making of the letters. How simple! How wonderful! How utterly, imperatively necessary!

Are you having trouble with your letters? There is only One who can help you. Why not yield yourself in full surrender to Him today?—By Sanford T. Whitman, Signs of the Times, December 19, 1956.

 
Contributed By:
John Shearhart
 
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It does not matter where He places me or how. That is rather for Him to consider than for me. For the easiest positions, He must give grace; and in the most difficult, His grace is sufficient. So, if God places me in great perplexity, must He not give me much guidance? In positions of great difficulty, much grace? In circumstances of great pressure and trial, much strength? As to work, mine was never so plentiful, so responsible, or so difficult; but the weight and strain are all gone. His resources are mine, for He is mine!

- J. Hudson Taylor

 
Contributed By:
Gordon Curley
 
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Tags: Grace (add tag)
 
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It does not matter where He places me or how. That is rather for Him to consider than for me. For the easiest positions, He must give grace; and in the most difficult, His grace is sufficient. So, if God places me in great perplexity, must He not give me much guidance? In positions of great difficulty, much grace? In circumstances of great pressure and trial, much strength? As to work, mine was never so plentiful, so responsible, or so difficult; but the weight and strain are all gone. His resources are mine, for He is mine!

- J. Hudson Taylor

 
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none
 

"To know Christ is the way to grow in holiness. Ask yourself, in the moment of perplexity or temptation, what would He do if He were here? Nothing else w...

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Contributed By:
Mark Brunner
 
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“Thank You Sir! May I Do Another?” Matthew 4:1-11 Key verse(s): 9-10:“Then the devil left him and angels came and attended him.”

“Thank you sir! May I do another?” Crouching on the ground, the recruit seemed barely touched by the sergeant’s rough treatment. He was doing push-ups; and a lot of them. Each time he pushed his struggling frame up, the sergeant would rest his boot on the small of the private’s back and down he would go again. Then his overseer would bark, “What do you like, soldier?” The recruit, prone and struggling to complete just one more cycle of lift, would shout out, “Thank you sir, may I do another?” Although it was obvious that the recruit really wasn’t interested in doing another push-up, it was also certain that he knew exactly what he was doing. It was the sargeant’s expectation that the recruit would ask, so the soldier made it his will to meet that expectation. He had been drilled to believe that the pain and the effort would be worth it in the end. The sergeant had guaranteed him that when he was through with his “style” of training, the recruit would be fit for duty and able to deal with anything the enemy might hand out.

We, as witnesses to that scene, would probably see the sargeant’s actions as mean-spirited and unmotivating. Watching that recruit go up and down, always asking for more punishment, would put our minds in a spin. There is no logic to this kind of behavior. Wouldn’t the carrot and the stick be more motivating than pain and punishment? “It certainly isn’t the way that we would be motivated anyway!” Nevertheless, this tried and true regime has been used for centuries in training recruits. Why? Because it works. When a soldier is in a war-time situation there often isn’t opportunity to think things through. Following orders at that critical juncture is all that matters; even when those orders mean harsh, even death-defying tasks. There needs to be an action/reaction instinct in a soldier. Since it can’t be “fright/flight”, that which is innate in every person, the trainer needs to reshape the reaction to fit the action. And there’s only one way to do that--drill!

Our lives seem like that sometimes. Often it seems that God is laying out a harsher regime than we think is necessary. We blink and wince and then ask. “Is this what grace is all about? How can a loving God expect us to go through all of this?” Author James Packer writes: “Grace is God drawing sinners closer and closer to him. How does God in grace prosecute this purpose? Not by shielding us from assault by the work, the flesh, and the devil, nor by protecting us from burdensome and frustrating circumstance, not yet by shielding us from troubles created by our own temperament and psychology, but rather by exposing us to all these things, so as to overwhelm us with a sense of our own inadequacy, and to drive us to cling to him more closely. This is the ultimate reason, from our standpoint, why God fills our lives with troubles and perplexities of one sort and another -- it is to ensure that we shall learn to hold him fast. The reason why the Bible spends so much of its time reiterating that God is a strong rock, a firm defense, and a sure refuge and help for the weak is that God spends so much of his time showing us that we are weak, both mentally and morally, and dare not trust ourselves to find or follow the right road. When we walk along a clear road feeling fine, and someone takes our arm to help us, likely we would impatiently shake him off; but when we are caught in rough country in the dark, with a storm brewing and our strength spent, and someone takes our arm to help us, we would thankfully lean on him. And God wants us to feel that our way through life is rough and perplexing, so that we may learn to lean on him thankfully. Therefore he takes steps to drive us out of self-confi...

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