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Illustration results for sand rock

Contributed By:
eric carey-holt
 
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Once upon a time, in a land far away, there was a lighthouse that sat on a rocky shore and helped ships get through the water safely without hitting any big nasty rocks. One day the lighthouse operator became sick and a temporary substitute was put in charge of the lighthouse. While he was there tending the lighthouse a big storm blew up and sand and branches and all kinds of things were flying around in the wind. The temporary lighthouse keeper got out a big piece of canvas and covered up the lantern so it would not get wet or damaged in the storm. That night a ship blew upon the rocks and sank with all hands. Sounds silly, doesn’t it - I mean - who, as Jesus puts it, lights a lamp and then puts it under a bowl?

 
Contributed By:
David Hill
 
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EDWARD MOTE GREW UP IN THE 1800 PARENTS OWNED AND OPERATED A PUB IN ENGLAND. HE GREW UP NEVER KNOWING THERE WAS A GOD.
AS A YOUNG MAN HE TOOK A JOB AS A CABINETMAKER. HIS BOSS A STRONG CHRISTIAN LED HIM TO JESUS. LATER IN HIS LIFE EDWARD MOTE BEGAN TO WRITE HYMNS. ONE I SURE
YOU KNOW IS “THE SOLID ROCK”

LISTEN TO THE WORDS...

MY HOPE IS BUILT ON NOTHING LESS THAN JESUS BLOOD AND RIGHTEOUSNESS; I DARE NOT TRUST THE SWEETEST FRAME, BUT WHOLLY LEAN ON JESUS NAME.

ON CHRIST, THE SOLID ROCK I STAND; ALL OTHER GROUND IS SINKING SAND.

 
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"You know the words from the Bible: Build not on sand, but on rock... Communist leaders respect only firmness...and laugh at persons who give in to them."

 
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Life Is Like A Jar Of Rocks
A philosophy professor stood before his class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly he picked up a large empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks, rocks about 2 inches in diameter. He then asked the students if the jar was full? They agreed that it was. So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was. The students laughed. The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. "Now," said the professor, "I want you to recognize that this is your life. The rocks are the important things - your family, your partner, your health, your children - things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full. "The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, your car. The sand is everything else. The small stuff." "If you put the sand into the jar first, there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you. Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out for dinner. There will always be time to go...

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Vacation: three weeks on the sands the rest of the year on the rocks.

 
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Tags: Heaven (add tag)
 
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A while back an expert on the subject of time management was speaking to a group of business students. After speaking to them for a while, he said, “Okay, it’s time for a quiz.” He set a one-gallon, wide mouthed Mason jar on the table in front of him. Then he produced about a dozen fist-sized rocks & carefully placed them, one at a time, inside the jar. When the jar was filled to the top & no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, “Is this jar full?” Everyone in the class said, “Yes.” “Really?” he said. Then he reached under the table & pulled out a bucket of gravel. He dumped some gravel into the jar & shook it, causing pieces of gravel to work themselves down into the spaces between the big rocks. Then he smiled & asked the group once more, “Is the jar full?” By this time the class was on to him. “Probably not,” one of them said. “Good” he replied. And he reached under the table & brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the sand in & it filled all the spaces between the rocks & the gravel. Once more he asked, “Is this jar full?” “No” the class shouted. Again he said, “Good” Then he grabbed a pitcher of water & began to pour in the water until the jar was filled to the brim. Then he looked back at the class & asked, “What is the point of this illustration?” One eager beaver raised his hand & said, “The point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard, you can always fit something more into it” “No,” the speaker replied, “that’s not the point. The truth this illustration teaches us is this: If you don’t put the big rocks in first, you’ll never get them in at all.” What are the big rocks of your life? They should include these: Each day drawing nearer to God, spending time with Him in prayer, & seeking His guidance for your life through reading His Word. Remember to put these BIG ROCKS in first or you’ll never get them in at all.

 
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UNSTEADY GROUND: JUST KEEP GOING

Have you ever stepped on ground that seemed unsteady, but you really had to go on, just to get where you were going?

Just recently we took a trip up to the (northern part of South Korea) Hwacho’n area and then down to the Chuncho’n areas. We stopped at a nice restaurant where they had those outside gazebo kind of things. We had our steamed chicken in herbs beside a flowing stream. The flowing water, the setting, and the dragonflies buzzing over the corn across the stream, all added to the taste of this meal.

Well, after we finished, the ladies decided they wanted to wade or walk in the stream. There was a very small sand bar, or bank, in the middle of the stream, while the rest was pebbles and rocks. One of the ladies cautiously stepped over to the sand bar. She didn’t put all of her weight in that first step, wary that she would sink in the sand. Then a little more weight, a little more weight, until she was standing on the small sand bar. Then, she took another step with the same apprehension, the same hesitation. She found out it was solid and able to support her, and she then began walking around without a care in the world about the sand bar. The apprehensive thoughts disappeared and she began to focus on what was around her. In faith she stepped out, and she realized and rejoiced that the ground was able to support her.

In a way, that’s faith, faith that the ground, or in church ministry, God will support you. That’s what we do in ministry. We step out. Sometimes that first step is hard, shaky, or uncertain, but we take it anyway because we trust and have faith in God. Do you trust Him? If you’re not trusting Him, you’ll never take that first step. Are you willing to step out? Are you willing to take that seed of faith and replant it?

 
Contributed By:
Bruce Howell
 
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The empire of Caesar is gone; the legions of Rome are smouldering in the dust; the avalanches that Napoleon hurled upon Europe have melted away; the prince of the Pharaohs is fallen; the pyramids they raised to be their tombs are sinking every day in the desert sands; Tyre is a rock for bleaching fisherman’s nets; Sidon has scarcely left a wreck behind; but the Word of God still survives. All things that threatened to extinguish it have only aided it; and it prove...

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Contributed By:
Sermon Central
 
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SANDBAR FAITH

Have you ever stepped on ground that seemed unsteady, but you really had to go on, just to get where you were going?

Just recently we took a trip up to the (northern part of South Korea) Hwacho'n area and then down to the Chuncho'n areas. We stopped at a nice restaurant where they had those outside gazebo kind of things. We had our steamed chicken in herbs beside a flowing stream. The flowing water, the setting, and the dragonflies buzzing over the corn across the stream, all added to the taste of this meal.

Well, after we finished, the ladies decided they wanted to wade or walk in the stream. There was a very small sand bar, or bank, in the middle of the stream, while the rest was pebbles and rocks. One of the ladies cautiously stepped over to the sand bar. She didn't put all of her weight in that first step, wary that she would sink in the sand. Then a little more weight, a little more weight, until she was standing on the small sand bar. Then, she took another step with the same apprehension, the same hesitation. She found out it was solid and able to support her, and she then began walking around without a care in the world about the sand bar. The apprehensive thoughts disappeared and she began to focus on what was around her. In faith she stepped out, and she realized and rejoiced that the ground was able to support her.

In a way, that's faith, faith that the ground, or in church ministry, God will support you. That's what we do in ministry. We step out. Sometimes that first step is hard, shaky, or uncertain, but we take it anyway because we trust and have faith in God. Do you trust Him? If you're not trusting Him, you'll never take that first step. Are you willing to step out? Are you willing to take that seed of faith and replant it?

From David Richardson's Sermon "Where Are YOU Going With Your Faith?"

 
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Sermon Central Staff
 
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THE KEEPER OF THE SPRINGS by Peter Marshall

Once upon a time, a certain town grew up at the foot of a mountain range. It was sheltered in the lee of the protecting heights, so that the wind that shuddered at the doors and flung handfuls of sleet against the window panes was a wind whose fury was spent.

High up in the hills, a strange and quiet forest dweller took it upon himself to be the Keeper of the Springs. He patrolled the hills and wherever he found a spring, he cleaned its brown pool of silt and fallen leaves, of mud and mold and took away from the spring all foreign matter, so that the water which bubbled up through the sand ran down clean and cold and pure. It leaped sparkling over rocks and dropped joyously in crystal cascades until, swollen by other streams, it became a river of life to the busy town.

Millwheels were whirled by its rush. Gardens were refreshed by its waters. Fountains threw it like diamonds into the air. Swans sailed on its limpid surface, and children laughed as they played on its banks in the sunshine.

But the City Council was a group of hard-headed, hard-boiled businessmen. They scanned the civic budget and found in it the salary of a Keeper of the Springs. Said the Keeper of the Purse: Why should we pay this romance ranger? We never see him; he is not necessary to our town’s work life. If we build a reservoir just above the town, we can dispense with his services and save his salary. Therefore, the City Council voted to dispense with the unnecessary cost of a Keeper of the Springs, and to build a cement reservoir.

So the Keeper of the Springs no longer visited the brown pools but watched from the heights while they built the reservoir. When it was finished, it soon filled up with water, to be sure, but the water did not seem to be the same. It did not seem to be as clean, and a green scum soon befouled its stagnant surface.

There were constant troubles with the delicate machinery of the mills, for it was often clogged with slime, and the swans found another home above the town. At last, an epidemic raged, and the clammy, yellow fingers of sickness reached into every home in every street and lane.

The City Council met again. Sorrowfully, it faced the city’s plight, and frankly it acknowledged the mistake of the dismissal of the Keeper of the Springs. They sought him out of his hermit hut high in the hills, and begged him to return to his former joyous labor. Gladly he agreed, and began once more to make his rounds.

It was not long until pure water came lilting down under tunnels of ferns and mosses and to sparkle in the cleansed reservoir. Millwheels turned again as of old. Stenches disappeared. Sickness waned and convalescent children playing in the sun laughed again because the swans had come back.

So...have you been neglecting your spiritual spring?

(From a sermon by Steven Simala Grant, Holy Water! 9/1/2011)

 
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