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Illustration results for Pride

Contributed By:
Tony Miano
 
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How many of you have seen the modern-day Christmas classic, “A Christmas Story?” It’s a great movie about one family’s Christmas season and a little boy’s mission to receive the Cadillac of BB guns as a present. The Miano family watches this movie every year. Whenever I see the scene of Ralphie being forced to try on the bunny pajamas, I think of the purple turtleneck sweaters my grandmother would get me every year. I hated those sweaters—and I had to wear them whenever grandma came over.

The movie is filled with scenes that will take you back to the nostalgia of your childhood. Another such scene is one in which the tongue plays a prominent role. The scene involves Ralphie, whose adult counterpart narrates the entire movie, and Ralphie’s friends, Flick and Schwartz.

We find the three boys, along with a bunch of other kids, huddled around the school flagpole. It is a cold and snowy day, and everyone is bundled up like Eskimos. The scene begins with Schwartz trying to convince Flick that his tongue would stick to the flagpole. Flick told Schwartz he was “full of it.” Schwartz responds by issuing a “double-dog dare” to Flick. The camera pans to Ralphie and the group of kids who all gasp at the challenge.

Flick is momentarily taken aback by the challenge, but quickly smiles and says that it would be stupid for him to put his tongue on the flagpole. The narrator returns and explains the etiquette of the dare. He explains that proper form would be to follow his “double-dog dare” with a “triple-dare-you.” If this challenge was not met, then, and only then, should Schwartz go to the worst of the worst—“the triple-dog dare.”

But Schwartz, determined to see his friend’s tongue stuck to the flagpole, goes for the jugular and, with the authority of a nine-year-old, issues a “triple-dog dare.” You can see the panic on Flick’s face as he realizes that he has no choice but to place his tongue on the flagpole. To do otherwise, to refuse a “triple-dog dare” challenge, would be tantamount to playground cowardice.

So with some false bravado, and a lot of uncertainty, Flick sticks out his tongue and touches it to the flagpole. Any guesses as to what happened? Yep. It stuck like a bug on flypaper. Of course, Flick panicked and started to squeal like a little girl (no offense ladies). The school bell rang, which made it convenient for Flick’s good friends, Ralphie and Schwartz, along with all of the other kids, to scramble back to class, leaving Flick alone in his moment of shame and pain.

Pride got in the way of Flick making a wise decision. Pride caused Flick to say and do things he should not have done. The moral of the story is that the pride of the tongue, the pride of speech, if you will, can stick us with some very serious consequences. And this is what James addresses in verse one and the first half of verse two, in chapter three.

 
Contributed By:
Rodney Buchanan
 
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O Brother, Where Art Thou? is a comedy set during America’s Depression era. The story revolves around three petty criminals who escape from a chain gang. One of them, the leader named Everett Ulysses McGill, tells his companions that he has buried money from a bank robbery near his property in order to persuade them to make a run for it. But near the end of the movie, the law catches up with them, and even though they have been pardoned by the governor, the lawman who has been pursuing them is intent on hanging them. As they are about to be hanged, Everett, Delmer, and Pete stand trembling in front of a large oak, deep in the woods and far away from anyone who can help them. They turn their eyes up to the three ropes that hang from the old tree. Everett, who never had much use for God before, drops to his knees and begins to pray for a miracle from God. “Lord, please look down and recognize us poor sinners. Please, Lord, I just want to see my daughters again. I’ve been separated from my family for so long. I know I’ve been guilty of pride and short dealing. I’m sorry I turned my back on you. Forgive me. We’re helpless, Lord. Help us, please.” As Everett ends his prayer, a small stream of water begins to run around his knees. His companions also notice the water and stare at it in confusion. As the wind blows, suddenly a great wall of water sweeps away everyone and everything in its path — including the lawmen who were about to hang them. The next scene shows Everett, Delmer, and Pete gasping for air as they break the surface of the water. Delmer raises his voice yelling, “It’s a miracle We prayed to God, and he pitied us ” Everett, who just a short time was crying out to God for just such a miracle, chastises his friends as “hayseeds” for believing that it was an act of God. He says, “Don’t be ignorant. There’s a perfectly scientific explanation for what just happened.” Pete says, “That ain’t the tune you were singin’ back there at the gallows ” Everett brushes it off and says, “Well, any human being will cast about in moment of stress.”
There are many people like Everett who use God in a time of crisis and then abandon him when life seems back under their control. But the only reason we can have the confidence to ask, seek and knock is because of an intimate relationship of trust and mutual love. It is a love that follows God and obeys him.

 
Contributed By:
Ronnie  Brown
 
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The word impenitent means without repentance, without remorse. In one of my favorite movies, Indiana Jones is looking for the Holy Grail. He has certain clues that will take him through the deadly traps that lay ahead. The first clue is this: “The Breath of God. Only the penitent man will pass.” Jones begins to repeat the phrase under his breath searching for its meaning, “Penitent man, penitent man, penitent, penitent. The penitent man is humble before God, He kneels before God. Kneel!” At that moment, as Dr. Jones falls to his knees, a giant blade swoops through where his neck was just a second before. Because of haughtiness and pride the impenitent man refuses to bend a knee. Refuses humble himself before the mighty hand of God. Proverbs 16:18 Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall. Does this not sound like man in our world today, that shake their insignificant fist in the face of an all powerful God: A world that mocks and laughs at the testimony of scripture; that blasphemes Jehovah, and spits upon the deity of the Lord Jesus Christ? They are unrepentant in their violation of God’s law.

 
Contributed By:
A. Todd Coget
 
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(Elapsed time: Measured from the beginning of the opening credit, this scene begins at 01:46:50 and ends at 01:49:00. Content: In Love and War is rated PG-13 for sensuality and graphic portrayal of war injuries.)
The movie In Love and War is based on the WWI experiences of author Ernest Hemingway. The 18-year-old Hemingway (Chris O’Donnell) is a Red Cross volunteer in Italy just before the end of the war. While stationed there, he meets, falls in love with, and proposes to Red Cross nurse Agnus von Kurowsky (Sandra Bullock). But Agnus, unbeknownst to Hemmingway, accepts a marriage proposal from an Italian doctor after Hemingway returns to America. When Hemingway finds out, he is brokenhearted. Agnus later cancels the wedding, realizing she really loves Hemingway.
Agnus travels to Hemingway’s lakeside cottage to declare her love for him. As they stand on the veranda, Hemingway, bitter over Agnus’ previous rejection of him, turns his back on her. He says nothing. Agnus slides next to him and declares, "I’ll love you as long as I live." But Hemingway does not reciprocate. Instead, he walks into the cottage, bangs his hand on the table in frustration, and covers his eyes in anguish. Agnus sadly walks away.
Agnus narrates the film’s conclusion:
I never saw Ernie again after Waloon Lake. I often wonder what might have happened if he had taken me in his arms. But I guess his pride meant he wasn’t able to forgive me. Some say...

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Contributed By:
Wayne Field
 
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Perhaps you’ve seen the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou? It’s a comedy set during America’s Depression era.

The story revolves around three petty criminals who escape from a chain gang. George Clooney stars as the leader named Everett Ulysses McGill. He tells his companions that he has buried money from a bank robbery near his property in order to persuade them to make a run for it. But near the end of the movie, the law catches up with them, and even though they have been pardoned by the governor, the lawman who has been pursuing them is intent on hanging them. As they are about to be hanged, Everett, Delmer, and Pete stand trembling in front of a large oak, deep in the woods and far away from anyone who can help them. They turn their eyes up to the three ropes that hang from the old tree. Everett, who never had much use for God before, drops to his knees and begins to pray for a miracle from God. “Lord, please look down and recognize us poor sinners. Please, Lord, I just want to see my daughters again. I’ve been separated from my family for so long. I know I’ve been guilty of pride and short dealing. I’m sorry I turned my back on you. Forgive me. We’re helpless, Lord. Help us, please.” As Everett ends his prayer, a small stream of water begins to run around his knees. His companions also notice the water and stare at it in confusion. As the wind blows, suddenly a great wall of water sweeps away everyone and everything in its path — including the lawmen who were about to hang them. The next scene shows Everett, Delmer, and Pete gasping for air as they break the surface of the water. Delmer raises his voice yelling, “It’s a miracle We prayed to God, and he pitied us ” Everett, who just a short time was crying out to God for just such a miracle, chastises his friends as “hayseeds” for believing that it was an act of God. He says, “Don’t be ignorant. There’s a perfectly scientific explanation for what just happened.” Pete says, “That ain’t the tune you were singin’ back there at the gallows ” Everett brushes it off and says, “Well, any human being will cast about in moment of stress.”

There are many people like Everett who use God in a time of crisis and then abandon him when life seems back under their control. But the only reason we can have the confidence to ask, seek and knock is because of an intimate relationship of trust and mutual love. It is a love that follows God and obeys him.

 
Contributed By:
Peter Bines
 
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The Bride’s attitude to herself is summed up in Song of Songs 1:5 ‘Dark am I yet lovely.’ In the BBC’s 1995 adaptation of Pride & Prejudice there’s a scene where Mr Darcy’s sisters are discussing with their brother the physical beauty or otherwise of Miss Elisabeth Bennett. The sisters negatively remark that Miss Bennett is too dark in her skin, that is, suntanned. You see, In 18th century English society it was considered somewhat common for a woman to be tanned, and a light, fair skin was thought to be a plus sign in the aristocratic beauty stakes.

That’s how it was for the Bride here. The King has brought His bride into His royal tents. She sees the King’s female attendants who haven’t been exposed to the hot middle-eastern sun and so have relatively fair complexions – her heavy suntan showed that she was used to working outside and was from the common people. Now the Bride’s conscious of how she stands out: ‘Dark am I.’ But then she’s able to say, ‘yet lovely.’ You see, she has a very special relationship with the King and to Him is beautiful.

 
Contributed By:
David Ward
 
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The movie "Drumline" explores the maturation process of a talented percussionist from Harlem who receives a full-ride scholarship to play in Atlanta A&T University’s marching band.
As the scene opens the incoming band members are on the football field. The Atlanta A&T marching band is going through drills and orienting the incoming freshman. Dr. Lee’s section leaders are huddled in various sections of the football field divided according to instruments. Each leader articulates with a sense of pride the uniqueness of their instrument and their indispensability.
a. The trumpet section leader states with brassy confidence, "Trumpets are the voice of the band. We are the melody. We are the clarity."
b. The tuba section leader similarly boasts of his instrument: "Tubas are the most important section in the band, boy. Tubas are the boom."
c. As the camera pans the field we hear the saxophone leader rallying his troops: "Saxophones are the truth, the funk and the hook."
d. The percussionists circle their section leader, clapping rhythmically. Their leader says, "We are the heart and the soul. Without the percussionists, the band doesn’t move, doesn’t come alive." While the clapping continues, he puts his fingers on the neck of one of his frosh drummers. As he feels the throbbing artery, he adds, "We are the pulse. Without a pulse, you’re dead."
Each member & each section understands their importance.

 
Contributed By:
Roger Nelmes
 
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The Titanic movie
Segregation of the rich and poor…
Rose DeWitt Bukater, rich, educated and beautiful
Caledon Hockley, heir to a Pittsburg steel fortune, handsome and sophisticated.
Jack Dawson, a poor orphan who worked from job to job with no real future in sight.
This particular movie focused on the relationship of two people from two different worlds, Rose and Jack.

That movie very clearly showed us the dangers of pride, discrimination, and social cliques.

 
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In the movie "Remember the Titans" a high school is being integrated in 1971. The new black coach challenges the football players to unite to win rather than stay divided and lose. Only as the players surrendered their pride and seek what was best for the team were they able to win.

 
Contributed By:
Michael McCartney
 
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Closing Video illustration: When the Titanic sinks from the Movie Titanic!

The Clip shows you the end result of pride and arrogance toward God. If you want to end up like the Titanic stay prideful in your self and reject God. But if you want to be set free and rescued from your sinking ship choose to die to self and to your pride and let Jesus flood into your heart and make it clean and receive a second chance. Then always point the finger at the one who delivered you as he uses you in His service.

 
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