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Illustration results for law

Contributed By:
James May
 
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I saw a movie recently titled “Oh Brother Where Art Thou” where three escaped criminals were on the run. One scene in this movie stands out to me more than any other.

While on the run they are involved in a baptismal scene at the river. Two of the criminals are baptized by the preacher and they immediately think that all of their past sin is gone and that they are now innocent again, and the law can’t touch them.

There was no repentance or change of heart, they only got wet, but they thought the “preacher had washed their sins away”. Nothing can do that but the Blood of Jesus Christ though repentance and acceptance of Jesus as Lord and Savior.

The only one who had any intelligence among the three spoke up and his statement makes the point that I want to emphasize. He said, “The Lord may have forgiven you and washed your sin away, but the State of Mississippi isn’t so forgiving and you still have a debt to pay.”

 
Contributed By:
Michael Cassara
 
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The movie "Mighty Ducks" is a David vs Goliath type of film. Gordon Bombay, a high priced lawyer with a prestigious law firm is arrested for DWI and ordered to perform 500 hours of community service. His assignment is to coach a pee wee hockey team made up of a bunch of misfits and troubled kids from the inner city of Minneapolis. By his own admission, Gordon Bombay states, "I hate kids and I hate hockey." First game he coaches, the team has to play the best team in the league, the Hawks. The Hawks were a well coached team from the wealthy suburbs. They were big and mean and knew how to play hockey. Their coach was a win at all cost type of guy. They beat up this team of misfits 17-0.


Eventually, Gordon begins to overcome his own giants and takes a real interest in this group of misunderstood ten year old hockey players. Things begin to turn around and the eventually earn the last spot in the Minnesota State Pee Wee playoffs. They win their first two games and earn a spot in the championship game vs the Hawks, who are now 14-0. The Hawks break out to a 3-0 lead by the end of the first period. But the Ducks fight back and with 55 seconds left in the game tie the score at 4-4. As time runs out, a Duck player is taken down and a penalty shot is awarded to the Ducks. One on one vs the Hawks goalie. A chance for David to bring down Goliath.




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Contributed By:
Bill Bendert
 
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OUR GREATEST DESIRE

In the first Harry Potter book (and movie), Harry stumbles on a mirror in Hogwarts castle. It is the mirror of Erised. Erised, of course, is the word "desire" written backwards, as if seen in a mirror.

This magical mirror shows the one looking into it whatever they most desire. In Harry’s case, he sees his parents who died right after he was born. In Harry’s heart, his greatest desire is to see the parents he has never known.

When we look into the Perfect Mirror of the Law, we see our greatest desire. We see our failures and our shortcomings. And we see our need for a Saviour, who is Jesus Christ our Lord.
He is our greatest desire!

 
Contributed By:
Mike Wilkins
 
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In Les Misérables the antagonist is a police man named Javert. He is a pitiful man who believes in judgment alone and not mercy. Last week we saw the clip from the movie where Jean Valjean receives mercy from the Bishop and I told you that he lives the rest of his life trying to give the same mercy he received. Javert, on the other hand tries to live his life on the basis of justice and the rule of law – he says things like “once a thief, always a thief.” At one point of the movie he makes a mistake and requires the mayor to punish him – his justice must even apply to himself – but the mayor (Valjean in disguise) has mercy on him, finally ordering him to forgive himself, because the chief of police must obey an order from the Mayor. He is forever in pursuit of Valjean to bring him to justice. At one point in the story Valjean is given the chance to kill Javert, and be rid of his pursuer forever. Instead, he has mercy on him and sets him free. In the final scene, Javert and Valjean meet up again
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Javert cannot live with the reality that Valjean has been redeemed, and is a better man than he is, when he catches up with Valjean in the end, he sets him free and kills himself because he cannot live with the mercy that was shown him and th...

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Contributed By:
Rodney Buchanan
 
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O Brother, Where Art Thou? is a comedy set during America’s Depression era. The story revolves around three petty criminals who escape from a chain gang. One of them, the leader named Everett Ulysses McGill, tells his companions that he has buried money from a bank robbery near his property in order to persuade them to make a run for it. But near the end of the movie, the law catches up with them, and even though they have been pardoned by the governor, the lawman who has been pursuing them is intent on hanging them. As they are about to be hanged, Everett, Delmer, and Pete stand trembling in front of a large oak, deep in the woods and far away from anyone who can help them. They turn their eyes up to the three ropes that hang from the old tree. Everett, who never had much use for God before, drops to his knees and begins to pray for a miracle from God. “Lord, please look down and recognize us poor sinners. Please, Lord, I just want to see my daughters again. I’ve been separated from my family for so long. I know I’ve been guilty of pride and short dealing. I’m sorry I turned my back on you. Forgive me. We’re helpless, Lord. Help us, please.” As Everett ends his prayer, a small stream of water begins to run around his knees. His companions also notice the water and stare at it in confusion. As the wind blows, suddenly a great wall of water sweeps away everyone and everything in its path — including the lawmen who were about to hang them. The next scene shows Everett, Delmer, and Pete gasping for air as they break the surface of the water. Delmer raises his voice yelling, “It’s a miracle We prayed to God, and he pitied us ” Everett, who just a short time was crying out to God for just such a miracle, chastises his friends as “hayseeds” for believing that it was an act of God. He says, “Don’t be ignorant. There’s a perfectly scientific explanation for what just happened.” Pete says, “That ain’t the tune you were singin’ back there at the gallows ” Everett brushes it off and says, “Well, any human being will cast about in moment of stress.”
There are many people like Everett who use God in a time of crisis and then abandon him when life seems back under their control. But the only reason we can have the confidence to ask, seek and knock is because of an intimate relationship of trust and mutual love. It is a love that follows God and obeys him.

 
Contributed By:
Timothy Smith
 
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It’s amazing that sometimes in our twisted world that what’s right can be unjust - that some things that are legal don’t give justice to others. Perennially perky lawyer, Elle Woods understands that. She had just discovered that the mother of her Chihuahua, Bruiser, is being used in animal testing. She asks that the company release the dogs that they are mistreating with their testing but they refuse. But she finds hope when she discovers that her own law firm represents the animal testing company. Surely the partners will do the right thing for these unfortunate animals.

{Video Clip: Legally Blonde 2 - Start: Chap. 7:10:43 - End: Chap. 7:13:10 = 2:33}
While Elle’s request is played for laughs, the underlying principle behind it is serious. The partner’s response - that justice and the law are not the same thing - unfortunately, is all too often true. In fact there have been many who have used and abused the law to promote their own agendas. That is never more clearly seen than in the judicial proceedings that led to the guilty verdict of Jesus Christ.

 
Contributed By:
Ronnie  Brown
 
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The word impenitent means without repentance, without remorse. In one of my favorite movies, Indiana Jones is looking for the Holy Grail. He has certain clues that will take him through the deadly traps that lay ahead. The first clue is this: “The Breath of God. Only the penitent man will pass.” Jones begins to repeat the phrase under his breath searching for its meaning, “Penitent man, penitent man, penitent, penitent. The penitent man is humble before God, He kneels before God. Kneel!” At that moment, as Dr. Jones falls to his knees, a giant blade swoops through where his neck was just a second before. Because of haughtiness and pride the impenitent man refuses to bend a knee. Refuses humble himself before the mighty hand of God. Proverbs 16:18 Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall. Does this not sound like man in our world today, that shake their insignificant fist in the face of an all powerful God: A world that mocks and laughs at the testimony of scripture; that blasphemes Jehovah, and spits upon the deity of the Lord Jesus Christ? They are unrepentant in their violation of God’s law.

 
Contributed By:
Peter Schmidt
 
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When Jesus says the Holy Spirit would convict the world of guilt in regard to sin. What this simply means is what we went through in Bible class this morning: when we compare ourselves to God’s Law and see how we measure up, we don’t like what we see. It’s like we are looking into a mirror, and seeing an ugly, sin-stained person staring back at us. Have you ever read the book or seen the movie, "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde? In this story, a 20-year-old Dorian has a life-sized picture of himself painted. And he sees this picture and how beautiful it is, and he’s sad. Because the picture is going to always look the same while Dorian gets old and the stress and sins of life are going to cause him to age. And then Dorian makes a wish: he wishes that the picture would change while Dorian’s appearance would remain the same. And that’s what works out. When Dorian is cruel to people, those cynical lines show up around his mouth on the picture, but not on him. And as he ages and becomes a much more nasty person, he keeps his innocent exterior, and ...

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Contributed By:
Wayne Field
 
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Perhaps you’ve seen the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou? It’s a comedy set during America’s Depression era.

The story revolves around three petty criminals who escape from a chain gang. George Clooney stars as the leader named Everett Ulysses McGill. He tells his companions that he has buried money from a bank robbery near his property in order to persuade them to make a run for it. But near the end of the movie, the law catches up with them, and even though they have been pardoned by the governor, the lawman who has been pursuing them is intent on hanging them. As they are about to be hanged, Everett, Delmer, and Pete stand trembling in front of a large oak, deep in the woods and far away from anyone who can help them. They turn their eyes up to the three ropes that hang from the old tree. Everett, who never had much use for God before, drops to his knees and begins to pray for a miracle from God. “Lord, please look down and recognize us poor sinners. Please, Lord, I just want to see my daughters again. I’ve been separated from my family for so long. I know I’ve been guilty of pride and short dealing. I’m sorry I turned my back on you. Forgive me. We’re helpless, Lord. Help us, please.” As Everett ends his prayer, a small stream of water begins to run around his knees. His companions also notice the water and stare at it in confusion. As the wind blows, suddenly a great wall of water sweeps away everyone and everything in its path — including the lawmen who were about to hang them. The next scene shows Everett, Delmer, and Pete gasping for air as they break the surface of the water. Delmer raises his voice yelling, “It’s a miracle We prayed to God, and he pitied us ” Everett, who just a short time was crying out to God for just such a miracle, chastises his friends as “hayseeds” for believing that it was an act of God. He says, “Don’t be ignorant. There’s a perfectly scientific explanation for what just happened.” Pete says, “That ain’t the tune you were singin’ back there at the gallows ” Everett brushes it off and says, “Well, any human being will cast about in moment of stress.”

There are many people like Everett who use God in a time of crisis and then abandon him when life seems back under their control. But the only reason we can have the confidence to ask, seek and knock is because of an intimate relationship of trust and mutual love. It is a love that follows God and obeys him.

 
Contributed By:
Matthew Kratz
 
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Born into a captain’s family who traded at the East India Company, John Newton (July 24, 1725 – December 21, 1807) embarked on sea voyages at the young age of 11. He soon entered the prosperous slave trade until he nearly died on a voyage that would change his life forever. He proclaimed, “Only God’s amazing grace could and would take a rude, profane, slave-trading sailor and transform him into a child of God.” This would influence his famed hymn Amazing Grace, in which he declared he was once blind but now could see. Newton wrote the hymn after converting to Christianity in 1748 and abandoning his participation in the slave trade. In1764 he was ordained in the Church of England.

William Wilberforce first met John Newton when he (Wilberforce) was a child. Newton was the pastor at the church Wilberforce attended. He (Wilberforce) became reacquainted with Newton in his twenties when Wilberforce was on the brink of a career as a British MP (Member of Parliament). Wilberforce’s outspokenness on the abolition issue may well have also led Newton to make his first public confession of guilt over his past involvement in the slave trade. In the Amazing Grace, Wilberforce visits John Newton twice. The first time he asks Newton for advice about whether to leave politics and join the clergy. And, in hopes of using Newton’s testimony as a former slave trader, Wilberforce visits Newton for a second time, now at St. Mary Woolnoth Church in London. Here Wilberforce discovers that his former pastor is indeed blind.
He (Wilberforce) incorporated Newton’s confession into his plea for abolition. The vote to abolish the slave trade throughout the British Empire finally passed in 1807—the same year John Newton died. This year marks the 200th anniversary of the date when the abolition act first passed the vote of Parliament

Not limiting himself to just abolitionist work, Wilberforce dedicated his life to what he called his "two great objects:" abolishing slavery in the British Empire and what he called "the reformation of manners [society]." To this end, he advocated for child labour laws, campaigned for education of the blind and deaf, and founded organizations as diverse as the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) and the National Gallery (of Art). He managed to get written into the chart of the East Indies Trading Company the right of missionary to also go to India. In short, he paved the way for Christian missionary work in India, but also in West African countries such as Sierra Leone.

 
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