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Illustration results for weddings

Contributed By:
Kenneth Henes
 
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In one particular M*A*S*H episode, the character of Charles Emerson Winchester III has been on leave, only to have a woman show up at the unit who he had met on leave and claimed to be his wife. He, of course, being a upright person, was appalled to find out he had acted on leave in such a manner as to lose control of himself. The wedding was only a fabrication of one evening’s partying, but that was not the way a Winchester acted, and he was ashamed.

 
Contributed By:
Timothy Smith
 
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Tags: Baptism (add tag)
 
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One way baptism becomes a source of division, is when preachers emphasize it so much that they neglect the condition of the heart. It leads to people being baptized for the wrong reasons.

{Video Clip: My Big Fat Greek Wedding - Start Chp.10:50:10 - End: Chp.10:52:27 = 2:17}

Now being baptized, dunked in water, no more grants you citizenship in heaven than it actually changed Ian biologically into Greek. And we don’t oil you up or dunk you three times and we certainly don’t want you to be baptized just to get married or make someone else happy. Baptism needs to be your submission to what Jesus has asked of you. It is your declaration that you believe that only Jesus saves you.

 
Contributed By:
Mark Schaeufele
 
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Tags: Judgment (add tag)
 
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TWO KINDS OF PEOPLE

One of my all-time favorite movies is "My Big Fat Greek Wedding." In the movie the father in the story tells his daughter, "Tula, there are two kinds of people in the world; Greeks, and everyone that wish they was Greek!"

 
Contributed By:
Alan Perkins
 
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[Fiddler on the Roof]

Tevye: "Golde, I have decided to give Perchik permission to become engaged to our daughter, Hodel."

Golde: "What? He’s poor! He has nothing, absolutely nothing!"

Tevye: "He’s a good man, Golde. I like him. And what’s more important, Hodel likes him. Hodel loves him. So what can we do? It’s a new world... A new world. Love. Golde..." Do you love me?

Golde: Do I what?

Tevye: Do you love me?

Golde: Do I love you?
With our daughters getting married
And this trouble in the town
You’re upset, you’re worn out
Go inside, go lie down!
Maybe it’s indigestion

Tevye: "Golde I’m asking you a question..." Do you love me?

Golde: You’re a fool

Tevye: "I know..." But do you love me?

Golde: Do I love you?
For twenty-five years I’ve washed your clothes
Cooked your meals, cleaned your house
Given you children, milked the cow
After twenty-five years, why talk about love right now?

Tevye: Golde, The first time I met you
Was on our wedding day
I was scared

Golde: I was shy

Tevye: I was nervous

Golde: So was I

Tevye: But my father and my mother
Said we’d learn to love each other
And now I’m asking, Golde
Do you love me?

Golde: I’m your wife

Tevye: "I know..." But do you love me?

Golde: Do I love him?
For twenty-five years I’ve lived with him
Fought him, starved with him
Twenty-five years my bed is his
If that’s not love, what is?

Tevye: Then you love me?

Golde: I suppose I do

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Contributed By:
David Elvery
 
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In the musical “Fiddler on the Roof”, a russian peasant named Tevye asks his wife a simple question “Do you love me.”
Love him? Golde had never even met Tevye until the day of their arranged wedding. Now, after 25 years of marriage he wants to talk of love? It sounds so, so ... ridiculous, so foreign that she thinks he must have indigestion and should go and lie down for a while.
Tevye repeats the question however more earnestly this time.
“Golde wonders at his thinking, then explains how hard she has worked as his wife - cooking his meals, washing his clothes, having his children.
Still, it doesn’t satisfy Tevye and he asks again.
This time, Golde falls back on the obvious: she’s his Wife!
Even so, Tevye persists - does she love him?
After some reflection, she answers that she does indeed love him, realizing that her life hasn’t been just meaningless busy work. She has worked so hard because of her love for Tevye.

 
Contributed By:
Thomas Cash
 
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After 25 years of an arranged marriage, listen to Tevya’s question to Golde in the musical Fiddler on the Roof:
(Tevye) “Golde, I have decided to give Perchik permission to become engaged to our daughter, Hodel.”
(Golde) “What??? He’s poor! He has nothing, absolutely nothing!”
(Tevye) “He’s a good man, Golde. I like him. And what’s more important, Hodel likes him. Hodel loves him. So what can we do? It’s a new world... A new world. Love. Golde…Do you love me?”
(Golde) Do I what?
(Tevye) Do you love me?
(Golde) Do I love you? With our daughters getting married and this trouble in the town You’re upset, you’re worn out Go inside, go lie down! Maybe it’s indigestion
(Tevye) Golde I’m asking you a question... “Do you love me?”
(Golde) You’re a fool
(Tevye) I know...But do you love me?
(Golde) Do I love you? For twenty-five years I’ve washed your clothes Cooked your meals, cleaned your house Given you children, milked the cow After twenty-five years, why talk about love right now?
(Tevye) Golde, The first time I met you Was on our wedding day. I was scared
(Golde) I was shy
(Tevye) I was nervous
(Golde) So was I
(Tevye) But my father and my mother Said we’d learn to love each other And now I’m asking, Golde, Do you love me?
(Golde) I’m your wife!
(Tevye) I know...But do you love me?
(Golde) Do I love him? For twenty-five years I’ve lived with him Fought him, starved with him Twenty-five years my bed is his If that’s not love, what is?
(Tevye) Then you love me?
(Golde) I suppose I do
(Tevye) And I suppose I love you too
(Both) It doesn’t change a thing But even so After twenty-five years, It’s nice to know

 
Contributed By:
Jim Luthy
 
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Consider the experience of young Daniel in the movie, “The Karate Kid.” Daniel finds himself a little out of place when he and his mother move from New Jersey to California. When a group of tough guys beat him up, he enlists the help of Mr. Miyagi, an elderly Japanese gardener from his apartment complex, to teach him karate for self-defense. Mr. Miyagi agrees to teach Daniel and takes him out to his home. Instead of jumping in to the lessons, Daniel is put to work painting a fence, waxing Mr. Miyagi’s car, and sanding the floors. Daniel is growing quite frustrated with his experience, much like some of you who are frustrated with your life experiences. He thought he was supposed to be doing something else.

What Daniel didn’t know is that Mr. Miyagi was teaching him all along. The movements from the chores he was doing were the basics of karate. When Mr. Miyagi demonstrated that he was actually teaching the young student all along, Daniel was amazed and put his trust in him. From that day on, Daniel put his faith in Mr. Miyagi to teach him karate and much more.

In the same way that...

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Contributed By:
A. Todd Coget
 
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(Elapsed time: Measured from the beginning of the opening credit, this scene begins at 01:46:50 and ends at 01:49:00. Content: In Love and War is rated PG-13 for sensuality and graphic portrayal of war injuries.)
The movie In Love and War is based on the WWI experiences of author Ernest Hemingway. The 18-year-old Hemingway (Chris O’Donnell) is a Red Cross volunteer in Italy just before the end of the war. While stationed there, he meets, falls in love with, and proposes to Red Cross nurse Agnus von Kurowsky (Sandra Bullock). But Agnus, unbeknownst to Hemmingway, accepts a marriage proposal from an Italian doctor after Hemingway returns to America. When Hemingway finds out, he is brokenhearted. Agnus later cancels the wedding, realizing she really loves Hemingway.
Agnus travels to Hemingway’s lakeside cottage to declare her love for him. As they stand on the veranda, Hemingway, bitter over Agnus’ previous rejection of him, turns his back on her. He says nothing. Agnus slides next to him and declares, "I’ll love you as long as I live." But Hemingway does not reciprocate. Instead, he walks into the cottage, bangs his hand on the table in frustration, and covers his eyes in anguish. Agnus sadly walks away.
Agnus narrates the film’s conclusion:
I never saw Ernie again after Waloon Lake. I often wonder what might have happened if he had taken me in his arms. But I guess his pride meant he wasn’t able to forgive me. Some say...

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