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Illustration results for Motives

Contributed By:
K. Edward "Ed" Skidmore
 
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I remember a Youth Minister saying years ago "My problem is not motivating people; My problem is people DE-motivating me!" From years in ministry I have learned the hard way that People will disappoint you. People will oppose you. People will see themselves in competition with you. Sometimes in your own family. (even in your church family!) And I must admit that it can be a real downer to see your fiercest opposition coming from other Christians.

But Paul was able to see beyond the petty attitudes of these competitive Christians. He said, "But what does it matter? The important thing is that in every way, whether from false motives or true, Christ is preached. And because of this I rejoice." Philippians 1:18

 
Contributed By:
Jerry Falwell
 
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Money that individuals give comes to the church from five sources, or "pockets." Obviously, these are not actual pockets, but symbolic pictures representing five major motives of church members in giving to their church. When church leaders understand the nature and source of their church’s income, they can better plan a strategy for outreach and growth.

First Pocket: Money for "Light and Heat Bills". This represents the desire of some people to contribute to the general fund. Members are motivated out of concern for the operating expenses of the church. "The light and heat" pocket represents money given to salaries, supplies, utilities and general maintenance.

Second Pocket: Money for "Missions". Certain members want to contribute most of their money to foreign missions. This appeal will motivate them to give more than any other appeal. Other members want at least some of their money to go to outreach, usually out of their concern for the Great Commission.

Third Pocket: Money to Support "Ivy Walls". Some members are best motivated by the needs of education. Because some church members value higher education, they direct their money to build college classrooms, libraries, or to equip science laboratories.

Fourth Pocket: Money for the "Cup of Cold Water". Some members are best motivated to give to humanitarian purposes. These members have compassion for the needs of their hurting brothers. They give to hunger projects, hospitals, and to provide housing and emergency relief.

Fifth Pocket: Money for "Bricks and Mortar". Some people are best motivated to give for buildings or physical expansion. This money is specially earmarked for church buildings. Some give large amounts to physical projects, but only occasionally fund other projects. However, almost all members want to give something for their church building projects.

 
Contributed By:
George Dillahunty
 
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"A cynic is a man [or, woman] who tells you the truth about your own motives." - Russel Green

 
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SermonCentral 
 
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People are often unreasonable, illogical, and self-centered; Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, People may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives; Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some false friends and some true
enemies;
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and frank, people may cheat you;
Be honest and frank anyway.

What you spend years building, someone could destroy overnight; Build anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, they may be jealous;
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, people will often forget tomorrow;
Do good anyway.

Give the world the best you have, and it may never be enough; Give the world the best you’ve ...

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Kindness can become its own motive. We are made kind by being kind.

 
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"A really thankful heart will extract motive for gratitude from everything, making the most even of scanty blessings."

 
Contributed By:
Matthew Kratz
 
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Tags: Hypocrisy (add tag)
 
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C.S. Lewis said:

"Humans are very seldom either totally sincere or totally hypocritical. Their moods change, their motives are mixed, and they are often themselves quite mistaken as to what their motives are."

(As quoted in: Barton, Bruce B.: Galatians. Wheaton, Ill. : Tyndale House, 1994 (Life Application Bible Commentary), S. 215).

 
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MORE THAN…

There’s a line in a song that goes: “Thanks a lot, thanks a lot…Thanks for all I’ve got.”
Thanks for all I’ve got? Actually, when I think of it, I’m embarrassed about all I’ve got. My mind goes to my garage. Unlike many people, we still fit our cars into our garage…barely.
I thought of garages. In early Corvallis days nobody had garages. Where did they put all their stuff? Later houses, up through the 50’s had only one garage. Beginning in the 60’s houses were built with two garages. Most folks still couldn’t get their cars inside. Then in the 90’s we began to see three garages with a RV pad as well. And it’s still not enough room for “all we’ve got.”
And at Thanksgiving I’m supposed to say, “Thanks for all I’ve got?” Instead of a national thanks giving day it would seem more appropriate to have a national embarrassment giving day. I’m embarrassed for all I’ve got.
It is worth remembering that the first thanksgiving was observed by poor, miserable people. Many of their number were dead. They were at war with “heathen natives” They didn’t have houses any larger than my garage and all their possessions wouldn’t fill one of my closets. While their religious motives for a day of thanksgiving to God a...

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Contributed By:
Sermon Central Staff
 
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Tags: Emotions (add tag)
 
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ALEXANDER MACLAREN ON THE RIGHT STIMULUS FOR ACTION

It is perfectly legitimate, although it is by no means the highest motive, to appeal to feeling as a stimulus to action. We have a right to base our urging of Christian men and women to missionary work either at home or abroad, upon the ground of the condition of the men to whom the Gospel has to be carried. I know that if taken alone it is a very inadequate motive. I believe that any failure that may be manifest in the interest of Christian people in missionary work is largely traceable to the blunder we have made in dwelling on superficial motives more than we ought to have done, in proportion to the degree in which we have dwelt on the deepest. So I say that a deeper reason than the sorrow and darkness of the heathen is -- 'the love of Christ constraineth me'; but yet the first is a legitimate one. Only remember this, that Bishop Butler taught us long ago, that if you excite emotions which are intended to lead to action, and the action does not follow, the excitation of the emotion without its appropriate action makes the heart a great deal harder than it was before. You cannot indulge in the luxury of emotion which you do not use to drive your spindles, without doing yourselves harm. It is never intended to be blown off as waste steam and allowed to vanish into the air. It is meant to be conserved and guided, and to have something done with it. Therefore beware of sentimental contemplation of the sad condition of the shepherdless sheep which does not move you to do anything to help them.


--Alexander MacLaren. From a sermon by Bill Sullivan, Help Wanted, 11/18/2010

 
Contributed By:
Larry Wilson
 
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Tags: Self (add tag)
 
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FOCUS ON CHRIST

The healthiest people do not think about their health; the weak induce disease by morbid introspection. If you begin to count your heartbeats, you will disturb the rhythmic action of the heart. If you continually imagine a pain anywhere, you will produce it. And there are some true children of God who induce their own darkness by morbid self-scrutiny. They are always going back on themselves, analyzing their motives, reconsidering past acts of consecration, comparing themselves with themselves. In one form or another self is the pivot of their life, albeit that it is undoubtedly a religious life. What but darkness can result from such a course?

--F.B. Meyer

 
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