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Illustration results for commitment

Contributed By:
Jeff Simms
 
Scripture:
Deuteronomy 8:13-8:14
Proverbs 30:8-30:9
Matthew 13:22-13:22
Luke 15:11-15:32
Titus 2:11-2:15
Isaiah 26:3-26:3
Luke 9:52-9:62
Psalms 139:7-139:8
2 Corinthians 3:13-3:18
Colossians 3:10-3:10
Luke 19:32-19:32
Luke 4:14-4:27
1 Peter 1:1-1:9
Ephesians 2:8-2:10
Ephesians 4:11-4:16
John 20:24-20:31
John 15:13-15:15
Matthew 24:17-24:21
2 Chronicles 7:1-7:4
Zechariah 9:9-9:12
John 1:1-1:18
Proverbs 4:1-4:30
Romans 8:35-8:39
1 Peter 1:4-1:4
2 Peter 1:4-1:4
Galatians 1:1-1:22
1 Peter 1:22-1:22
Matthew 28:19-28:20
Luke 5:1-5:11
James 4:1-4:10
Isaiah 57:15-57:15
1 John 2:2-2:2
Genesis 17:15-17:19
Jeremiah 31:27-31:34
Revelation 2:4-2:5
Joshua 18:1-18:25
Luke 18:9-18:14
2 Peter 1:3-1:11
Luke 19:1-19:10
Matthew 25:31-25:46
Proverbs 31:17-32:1
John 16:33-33:33
Nehemiah 2:18-2:20
John 13:23-13:24
2 Thessalonians 2:1-2:4
Matthew 25:21-25:21
John 4:21-4:24
John 3:16-4:1
John 10:7-10:15
John 12:1-12:8
Mark 3:1-3:9
Ecclesiastes 3:1-3:9
Mark 10:35-10:45
Psalms 100:1-100:5
Matthew 24:36-24:44
Luke 6:27-6:30
Matthew 2:1-2:18
Isaiah 7:1-7:16
Matthew 1:23-1:23
2 Corinthians 3:1-3:11
Matthew 3:1-3:12
Luke 2:1-2:7
Matthew 2:13-2:23
1 Kings 17:1-17:7
Matthew 5:21-5:37
Revelation 2:1-2:29
Hebrews 1:6-1:14
2 Timothy 1:3-1:5
John 17:1-17:24
Colossians 2:1-2:10
John 1:29-1:42
1 John 4:7-4:12
Proverbs 1:20-1:30
Joshua 1:1-1:9
1 John 5:1-6:12
1 John 5:1-5:12
1 John 5:10-5:12
Joshua 1:1-1:11
James 1:19-1:27
Matthew 22:37-22:40
John 2:1-2:11
Genesis 6:5-6:13
1 Corinthians 13:1-13:7
Matthew 26:26-26:30
2 Samuel 7:12-7:16
1 Corinthians 9:19-9:34
1 Corinthians 9:19-9:23
2 Timothy 3:10-3:17
Exodus 14:10-14:15
1 Timothy 6:19-6:19
Romans 12:1-12:2
Mark 3:7-4:34
Matthew 4:1-4:11
1 John 1:1-1:10
Philemon 1:17-1:19
Hebrews 11:8-11:10
Genesis 40:1-40:23
John 8:1-8:11
Colossians 4:2-4:6
John 14:15-14:21
Isaiah 48:17-48:18
2 Chronicles 1:6-1:12
Titus 3:1-3:5
Deuteronomy 1:1-28:28
Acts 8:9-8:24
Romans 12:12-12:14
Zechariah 12:1-13:9
1 Peter 1:18-1:23
Exodus 1:1-1:8
Colossians 3:22-4:1
2 Samuel 9:6-9:13
1 John 5:14-5:15
Mark 10:17-10:31
Luke 13:1-13:17
Matthew 21:1-21:11
Luke 19:28-40:19
Ecclesiastes 9:10-9:10
Romans 8:24-8:25
Philippians 4:6-4:12

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In a speech made in 1863, Abraham Lincoln said, "We have been the receipients of the choicest bounties of heaven; we have been preserved these many years in peace and prospertiy; we have grown in numbers, wealth, and power as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us, and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own. Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us."

 
Contributed By:
Sermon Central Staff
 
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$3.00 WORTH OF GOD, PLEASE

Tim Hansel in his book "When I Relax I feel Guilty," writes some insights of what most people want from God.

"I would like to buy $3.00 worth of God, please. Not enough to explode my soul or disturb my sleep, but just enough to equal a cup of warm milk or a snooze in the sunshine. I don't want enough of Him to make me love a black man or pick beets with a migrant. I want ecstasy, not transformation; I want the warmth of the womb, not a new birth. I want a pound of the Eternal in a paper sack. I would like to buy $3.00 worth of God, please."

If we would be totally honest, the idea of transformation really scares us. That is because we know that such a radical change would be quite uncomfortable. We realize that with transformation comes a major overhaul of our lives and priorities.

(From a sermon by Scott Chambers, The Mission if You Accept it: Transformation, 2/15/2011)

 
Contributed By:
Kevin Karhoff
 
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NO SALVATION WITHOUT SURRENDER

So in case some left it out or forgot to mention it when they explained what it meant to be a Christian, let me be clear: There is no forgiveness without repentance. There is no salvation without surrender. There is no life without death. There is no believing without committing.

Kyle Idleman, "Not a Fan" (p. 35)

 
Contributed By:
Dennis Lawrence
 
Scripture:
none
 

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. “The 1989 Armenian earthquake needed only four minutes to flatten the nation and kill thirty thousand people. Moments after that deadly tremor ceased, a father raced to an elementary school to save his son. When he arrived, he saw that the building had been leveled. Looking at the mass of stones and rubble, he remembered a promise he had made to his child: “No matter what happens, I’ll always be there for you.” Driven by his own promise, he found the area closest to his son’s room and began to pull back the rocks. Other parents arrived and began sobbing for their children. “It’s too late,” they told the man. “You know they are dead. You can’t help.” Even a police officer encouraged him to give up.

But the father refused. For eight hours, then sixteen, then thirty-two, thirty-six hours he dug. His hands were raw and his energy gone, but he refused to quit. Finally, after thirty-eight wrenching hours, he pulled back a boulder and heard his son’s voice. He c...

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Tags: Endurance (add tag)
 
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"The quality of a persons life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor."

 
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Simplicity is the answer for people tired and weary. Simplicity is marked by a contented lifestyle that rests in God’s grace. It is the commitment to clear out, scale down, and realize the essentials of what we truly need to live well. The intimate search for wholeness is not found by accumulating more things, but by entering into God’s presence every single day.

Michael G. Moriarty, The Perfect 10: The Blessings of Following God’s Commandments in a Post Modern World (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Pub. House, 1999), 204

 
Contributed By:
Warren Lamb
 
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Remarks by President Bush
At Arlington National Cemetery Memorial Day Commemoration
Arlington National Cemetery
May 31, 2004

This morning I had the honor of placing a wreath before the Tomb of the Unknowns. This custom is observed every Memorial Day on behalf of the American people as a mark of gratitude and respect.

And when this ceremony is concluded, and all of us have gone on our way, the Honor Guard will keep watch over the Tomb. Every hour of every day, on the coldest nights, in the hardest rain, there is a sentinel of the 3rd U.S. Infantry standing guard. The soldiers entrusted with that duty count it a privilege. And, today, as we reflect on the men and women who have died in the defense of America, all of us count it a privilege to be citizens of the country they served.

In the military tradition, no one is left behind on the field of battle. And our nation is determined to account for all of the missing. The same spirit can be seen in the respect we show to each life laid down for this nation. We receive them in sorrow, and we take them to an honored place to rest. At this and other cemeteries across our country, and in cemeteries abroad where heroes fell, America acknowledges a debt that is beyond our power to repay.

This weekend, we dedicated the World War II Memorial, which will stand forever as a tribute to the generation that fought that war and the more than 400,000 Americans who fell. Some here today can turn their minds back across 60 years and see the face of a buddy who never made it home. You are veterans who have not forgotten your comrades. And America will always honor the achievements and the character of your brave generation.

Through our history, America has gone to war reluctantly, because we have known the costs of war. And the war on terror we’re fighting today has brought great costs of its own. Since the hour this nation was attacked, we have seen the character of the men and women who wear our country’s uniform. In places like Kabul and Kandahar, in Mosul and Baghdad, we have seen their decency and their brave spirit. Because of their fierce courage, America is safer, two terror regimes are gone forever, and more than 50 million souls now live in freedom.

Those who have fought these battles and served this cause can be proud of all they have achieved. And these veterans of battle will carry with them for all their days the memory of the ones who did not live to be called veterans. They will remember young soldiers like Captain Joshua Byers, a West Point man born in South Carolina who died in Iraq. When this son of missionaries was given command of a 120-man combat unit, he wrote this to his parents: "I will give the men everything I have to give. I love them already, just because they’re mine. I
pray, with all my heart, that I will be able to take every single one of them home safe when we finish our mission here."

Sergeant Major Michael Stack, who was laid to rest at Arlington, wore the uniform for 28 years and is remembered as a soldier’s soldier. The sergeant major must have been quite a guy. When he was a young platoon sergeant, the recruits gave him a nickname: No Slack Billy Jack Stack. By all accounts, he was the kind of man you want in charge of a tough situation. And by the account of his mother, he finished his goodbyes with these words:
"Mom, I’m going because I believe in what I am doing. And if I don’t come back, we will meet in a better place."

Those who risked their lives on our behalf are often very clear about what matters most in their own lives, and they tell it to those they love. Master Sergeant Kelly Hornbeck, of the Special Forces, was killed in action last January, south of Samarra. To his parents back in Fort Worth, Texas, he wrote this: "I am not afraid, and neither should either of you be -- For I trust in my God and my training, two powerful forces that cannot be fully measured."

After Private First Class Jesse Givens, of Springfield, Missouri was lost last May, his family received a letter he had written to them in the event of his death. He wrote this to his son, Dakota: "You’ve taught me that life isn’t so serious, and sometimes you just have to play. You have a big, beautiful heart. Through your life, you need to keep it open and follow it. I will always be there in our park when you dream, so we can play." To his wife, Melissa, Private Givens wrote, "Do me a favor after you tuck the children in -- give them hugs and kisses from me. Go outside and look at the stars and count them. Don’t forget to smile." This is the quality of the people in our uniform.

And this is the loss to our nation. Markers on these hills record the names of more than 280,000 men and women. Each was once or still is the most important person in someone’s life. With each loss in war, the world changed forever for the family and friends left behind. Each loss left others to go on, counting the years of separation, and living in the hope of reunion.

Although the burden of grief can become easier to bear, always there is the memory of another time, and the feeling of sadness over an unfinished life. Yet, the completeness of a life is not measured in length only. It is measured in the deeds and commitments that give a life its purpose. And the commitment of these lives was clear to all: They defended our nation, they liberated the oppressed, they served the cause of peace. And all Americans who have known the loss and sadness of war, whether recently or long ago, can know this: The person they love and missed is honored and remembered by the United States of America.

May God bless our country.

 
Contributed By:
Doug Lyon
 
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Garibaldi had an incredibly committed volunteer army. He would appeal for recruits in these terms: “I offer neither pay, nor quarters, nor provisions; I offer hunger, thirst, forced marches, battles and death. Let him who loves his country with his heart and not with his lips only, follow me!”

Jesus invites you to discipleship. But He lets you know up front that it is a commitment that will cost you something. It’s...

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Contributed By:
Michael McCartney
 
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a. Holman defines FAITH: Trusting commitment of one person to another, particularly of a person to God. Faith is the central concept of Christianity. One may be called a Christian only if one has faith.
i. Holman adds: Our English word “faith” comes from the Latin fides, as developed through the Old French words fei and feid. In Middle English (1150-1475) “faith” replaced a word that eventually evolved into “belief.” “Faith” came to mean “loyalty to a person to whom one is bound by promise or duty.” Faith was fidelity. “Belief” came to be distinguished from faith as an intellectual process having to do with the acceptance of a proposition. The verb form of “faith” dropped out of English usage toward the end of the sixteenth century.

 
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A child at birth has the capacity to become original. Or you can put him in a mold so that he will come out like everybody else.

 
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