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Illustration results for servants heart

Contributed By:
Michael McCartney
 
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BLACKABY: WHAT DOES A CALLING LOOK LIKE?

Henry Blackaby shares from his book "The Power of the Call" pages 10-14 a clear picture of what one looks like who is called by God into pastoral ministry:

1. The pastor is chosen
2. He is chosen by God
3. He is chosen by God to be His servant
4. He is chosen by God to shepherd His people
5. He recognizes that God’s people are His inheritance, that they are God’s “special treasure” (Exodus 19:5-6).
6. He has integrity of heart.
7. He recognizes that his assignment will require “skillfulness of his hands” (hard work, consistent with his heart).
8. God calls his servants to be stewards (Acts 20:28-31)
9. God calls his servants to be spiritual leaders
a. You cannot do Kingdom work with the world’s methods.
10. The people are your ministry not the means you use to fulfill your ministry.

 
Contributed By:
Paul Newell
 
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James Hunter in his book “The Servant” presents a powerful picture of what it really means to be a leader/servant. He shares: leadership is ultimately rooted in our will. Not forcing our will on others, but demonstrating our will to serve.
There is a big difference between leading through power and leading through authority.
Many people can simply force people to do what they want because they have the power to make them. However, few people like to be forced to do anything. Eventually such “power driven leadership” destroys relationships.
On the other hand, some have the ability to lead through authority. Authority is different than power. Power is something you have and force on people. Authority is something you gain – it’s given to you by the people you lead.
How does one gain authority from those they lead? Only through service and sacrifice. When people see that you have their best interests at heart, when they see you are willing to sacrifice and serve them they will be willing to follow. That’s servant leadership, that’s authority.

 
Contributed By:
Terry Laughlin
 
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A Graduates Call
(Lord, teach us to pray)

Once Christian Graduates are continually feeding on the Word of God, the Holy Spirit will move them to be like the disciple who came to Jesus and said, "...Lord teach us to pray..." (Luke 11:1)

A popular term used today is "What would Jesus do." He would pray about everything. Jesus prayed at His baptism, (Luke 3:21) He prayed before the choosing of the twelve, (Luke 6:12) when the crowds began to increase, (Luke 5:16) before He asked the twelve for their confession of faith, (Luke 9:18) and at His Transfiguration. (Luke 9:29) The disciples knew that He often prayed alone (Mark 1:25) and it is only natural that those who know Him would ask Him to teach them to pray. If Jesus Christ, the perfect Son of God depended on prayer during His days on this earth (Hebrews 5:7) then why should it seem out of place for us to be obedient to God's Word that tells us to, "...pray continually..." (1 Thessalonians 5:17)

Prayer finds its heart in the personality of God, His ability and willingness to communicate with us through the power of the Holy Spirit. It involves a sure knowing that He has personal control in everything in our lives, in all things and over all creatures. Christians who believe these truths have no problem connecting with God in prayer. Abraham's servant connected in prayer and the Lord directed him to the person who should be the wife to his master's son. (Genesis 24:10-20)

Christian graduates are to be like Ezra and Nehemiah. Nehemiah prayed and asked the Lord to grant him favor with the Emperor of Persia. (Nehemiah 1:4-11) Ezra knew that it was God who put it in the king's heart to honor the house of the Lord. (Ezra 7:27-28)

Christian graduates who will enjoy Biblical success are those who will approach Jesus in every part of their lives and say, "Jesus, teach us to pray!

 
Contributed By:
Richard Wafford
 
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What God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit endeavored to do in the Garden of Eden has come full circle.
It wasn’t that God made a mistake in the garden and just corrected it.
No, he brought to himself created beings who withstood the evil and temptations of this sinful world to truly love him with all their hearts in spite of the allurements of this present world.
These are the people he fulfilled all the promises of God through
Those that love Christ and freely chose to love and serve him are greater servants of God than Adam and Eve before the fall.
In order to truly love someone we must go through the...

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Contributed By:
Michael McCartney
 
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Tags: David (add tag)
 
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DAVID'S EXTREMES

David’s life story is an amazing story of the extremes one person can face in a lifetime:

• Early years extremes:
o From seclusion to fame
o From being a nobody to a somebody.
o From forgotten to living legend
o From least to greatest
o From the runt of the family to the most powerful
o From seclusion to popularity
o From the pasture to the palace
o From poor to rich

• The middle years extremes:
o From fame to shame
o From somebody to a fugitive
o From hero to fugitive.
o From hero of Israel to outlaw
o From celebrated to despised
o From loved to hated
o From man of honor to liar
o From security to insecurity
o From hero to villain
o From applause to boo’s
o From married to separated
o From royalty to fugitive
o From riches to poverty
o From sanity to insanity
o From respected to disrespected
o From loyal servant to traitor

• The later years extremes;
o From a fugitive to a king
o From running for his life to running a nation.
o From the cave to palace
o From outlaw to the law giver
o From little to much
o From disrespected to respected
o From saint to sinner
o From blessed to cursed
o From giver to thief
o From man of honor to man of dishonor
o From lover to murderer
o From pure in heart to wicked heart
o From rebuked to repentance
o From repentance to forgiveness
o From father to fatherless
o From functional family to dysfunctional family
o From King to fugitive
o From respect to disrespect
o From fugitive to king again
o From Secure in God to security in numbers
o From Life to Death.

 
Contributed By:
Randy Aly
 
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Jim Burns wrote in CHRISTIANITY TODAY, “Compassion is one of the most important character traits we can nurture in our children. Yet our culture encourages selfishness. If we want our children to develop servant hearts, we need to give them opportunities to serve. Fortunately, teenagers are usually eager to put their gifts to good use. They want to impact their world, and Christian service is a wonderful way to help them quench that craving.

 
Contributed By:
Michael McCartney
 
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MACARTHUR’S NEW TESTAMENT COMMENTARY: ROMANS 9-16 by JOHN MACARTHUR, JR STATES THE FOLLOWING ABOUT OUR CHAPTER.
1. Despite the great popularity of the book of Romans, chapter 16 is often neglected by preachers, teachers, and Bible students. It has almost no explicit teaching and includes several lists of people, many of whom we know nothing about except what little, if anything, is said of them here. But they doubtless were a representative cross section of believers in Rome and of Paul’s companions at the time he wrote the letter. This passage is by far the most extensive and intimate expression of love and appreciation to come from the tender heart and inspired mind of the apostle Paul. It is a rich and rewarding section that yields many insights into the life of Paul, into the lives of other early Christians, and into the nature and character of the first-century church. The apostle’s comments about these mostly unknown individuals are all the more poignant because this great apostle takes time to speak so warmly and appreciatively of these “ordinary” Christians, who were as much his brothers and sisters in Christ as Peter, James, John, and other New Testament notables. He here reveals his deep affection for those whom he had served, for those who had served him, and for those who served with him. Paul continues the personal epilogue that began in 15:14 and reveals still more of his inner thoughts and feelings, not so much as an apostle as a fellow servant of Jesus Christ. In 15:14-33 he focuses on his relationship to the Lord in his ministry. In chapter 16 he focused on his relationship to other Christians with whom he has been associated in one way or another in his ministry. He specifically identifies, and sometimes briefly comments about, those to whom he felt the closest. He reveals his love for the community of the redeemed, his mutual accountability with them before God, and his dependence on them for his own ministry and for his own well-being. In many ways, this chapter reflects the personal and practical agapē love he has beautifully described in 13:8-10 and which, a few years earlier, he had portrayed in chapter 13 of his first letter to the church at Corinth.

 
Contributed By:
Bobby Scobey
 
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Watchman Nee:

"An obedient will and a harmonious will are very different. Obedience is related to actions, whereas harmony is related to character. The obedient will of a servant is seen in carrying out every order of his master.

"But the harmonious will is shown in the son who knows the father’s heart and whose will is one with the father’s. The harmonious will not only fulfills his duty but also fulfills it wi...

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Contributed By:
Michael McCartney
 
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The story of Rick Warren and his best-selling book the "The Purpose Driven Life."

What is he doing with all the money?

USA Today article: June 4th 2006 edition:
A uniter, not a divider
Warren is no liberal. He backed President Bush in the 2004 election and opposes abortion and stem cell research.
But in a refreshing change from today's unhealthy norm, Warren is spending his time and clout not on the divisive issues that have come to define the Christian right -- abortion, stem cell research, a supposedly anti-God judiciary and so on -- but on a campaign that can bring people together and save many lives in the process.
Warren is taking on poverty and AIDS and on a continent -- Africa -- that tends to command the least of the world's attention and resources.

PEACE is the moniker Warren has devised for his program in Rwanda. It stands for "Plant churches, Equip servant leaders, Assist the poor, Care for the sick and Educate the next generation."
In the tradition of evangelical Christianity, he believes the path to a better world runs through human hearts, and he is counting on churches and their members to lead the way against the seemingly intractable problems pressing down on Africa. "I'm coming from the fact that Jesus said, 'Love your neighbor as yourself,' " Warren said at a news conference in November at a global health summit. "So what motivates me is not politics."
As Warren told The Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper recently, "The New Testament says the church is the body of Christ, but for the last 100 years, the hands and feet have been amputated, and the church has just been a mouth. And mostly, it's been known for what it's against. ... I'm so tired of Christians being known for what they're against."

Some might be repelled by the explicitly Christian underpinnings of Warren's PEACE effort, but he has a talent for giving religion a friendly, welcoming face. Despite his conviction that homosexuality is wrong, Warren doesn't condemn gays or accept AIDS as God's retribution for unholy living, as have some of his conservative Christian fellows.
While he holds the belief that Jesus is the one true path to salvation, he does not make a point of predicting hell for non-believers, and he makes alliances with left-leaning, maverick Christians (such as U2 singer and global activist Bono) and some who are not Christian at all.

Certainly, Warren is not the only evangelical leader transcending the narrow spectrum of social issues that have come to define the public face of evangelicals in the minds of many Americans.
Bruce Wilkinson, whose Prayer of Jabez made him wealthy and famous, forsook the opportunity to parlay his book into greater profits and stardom in the USA. He went to South Africa, where he fought AIDS and worked for racial reconciliation until his recent retirement.
On the political side, a group of prominent evangelical leaders petitioned the Bush administration last year to pay more attention to poverty issues. More recently, another group of evangelical leaders -- Warren included -- announced a broad initiative to fight global climate change.

What makes Warren and his message attractive to some also makes him anathema to others. One posting at the Slice of Laodicea website, commenting on Warren's message at a United Nations prayer event, is representative of the sort of criticism he often generates: "A Benedict Arnold to the Gospel.
We can now see the TRUE COLORS of Rick Warren -- UN blue and Christian 'yellow.' " Some fundamentalists condemn his Purpose-Driven theology as unscriptural. Meanwhile, from his political left have come charges that he's a conservative wolf in ecumenical clothing and that his recent undertaking in Africa is a naive exercise in futility.

ii. Fortune Magazine Oct. 2005: Will success spoil Rick Warren?
The first time I saw Warren, he was striding down the aisle of a United Air Lines flight--the ...

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