|  Forgot password?
Easter and Good Friday - Free Sermons & Media Collection »
Home » All Resources » Illustrations » Illustration search: 65 results  Refine your search 

Illustration results for luke 2

Contributed By:
Jeff Simms
 
Scripture:
Deuteronomy 8:13-8:14
Proverbs 30:8-30:9
Matthew 13:22-13:22
Luke 15:11-15:32
Titus 2:11-2:15
Isaiah 26:3-26:3
Luke 9:52-9:62
Psalms 139:7-139:8
2 Corinthians 3:13-3:18
Colossians 3:10-3:10
Luke 19:32-19:32
Luke 4:14-4:27
1 Peter 1:1-1:9
Ephesians 2:8-2:10
Ephesians 4:11-4:16
John 20:24-20:31
John 15:13-15:15
Matthew 24:17-24:21
2 Chronicles 7:1-7:4
Zechariah 9:9-9:12
John 1:1-1:18
Proverbs 4:1-4:30
Romans 8:35-8:39
1 Peter 1:4-1:4
2 Peter 1:4-1:4
Galatians 1:1-1:22
1 Peter 1:22-1:22
Matthew 28:19-28:20
Luke 5:1-5:11
James 4:1-4:10
Isaiah 57:15-57:15
1 John 2:2-2:2
Genesis 17:15-17:19
Jeremiah 31:27-31:34
Revelation 2:4-2:5
Joshua 18:1-18:25
Luke 18:9-18:14
2 Peter 1:3-1:11
Luke 19:1-19:10
Matthew 25:31-25:46
Proverbs 31:17-32:1
John 16:33-33:33
Nehemiah 2:18-2:20
John 13:23-13:24
2 Thessalonians 2:1-2:4
Matthew 25:21-25:21
John 4:21-4:24
John 3:16-4:1
John 10:7-10:15
John 12:1-12:8
Mark 3:1-3:9
Ecclesiastes 3:1-3:9
Mark 10:35-10:45
Psalms 100:1-100:5
Matthew 24:36-24:44
Luke 6:27-6:30
Matthew 2:1-2:18
Isaiah 7:1-7:16
Matthew 1:23-1:23
2 Corinthians 3:1-3:11
Matthew 3:1-3:12
Luke 2:1-2:7
Matthew 2:13-2:23
1 Kings 17:1-17:7
Matthew 5:21-5:37
Revelation 2:1-2:29
Hebrews 1:6-1:14
2 Timothy 1:3-1:5
John 17:1-17:24
Colossians 2:1-2:10
John 1:29-1:42
1 John 4:7-4:12
Proverbs 1:20-1:30
Joshua 1:1-1:9
1 John 5:1-6:12
1 John 5:1-5:12
1 John 5:10-5:12
Joshua 1:1-1:11
James 1:19-1:27
Matthew 22:37-22:40
John 2:1-2:11
Genesis 6:5-6:13
1 Corinthians 13:1-13:7
Matthew 26:26-26:30
2 Samuel 7:12-7:16
1 Corinthians 9:19-9:34
1 Corinthians 9:19-9:23
2 Timothy 3:10-3:17
Exodus 14:10-14:15
1 Timothy 6:19-6:19
Romans 12:1-12:2
Mark 3:7-4:34
Matthew 4:1-4:11
1 John 1:1-1:10
Philemon 1:17-1:19
Hebrews 11:8-11:10
Genesis 40:1-40:23
John 8:1-8:11
Colossians 4:2-4:6
John 14:15-14:21
Isaiah 48:17-48:18
2 Chronicles 1:6-1:12
Titus 3:1-3:5
Deuteronomy 1:1-28:28
Acts 8:9-8:24
Romans 12:12-12:14
Zechariah 12:1-13:9
1 Peter 1:18-1:23
Exodus 1:1-1:8
Colossians 3:22-4:1
2 Samuel 9:6-9:13
1 John 5:14-5:15
Mark 10:17-10:31
Luke 13:1-13:17
Matthew 21:1-21:11
Luke 19:28-40:19
Ecclesiastes 9:10-9:10

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

In a speech made in 1863, Abraham Lincoln said, "We have been the receipients of the choicest bounties of heaven; we have been preserved these many years in peace and prospertiy; we have grown in numbers, wealth, and power as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us, and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own. Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us."

 
Contributed By:
Bruce Willis
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: Hypocrisy (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

Sometime ago a man who was Pastor in a large church, very successful in everything he did except one thing – the most important thing. He was failing in his marriage. The reason was, because his wife could see through him. She knew what he was really like. Not what he was like up in the pulpit, but at home. That’s where it counts. This man had written many books, served on one of the presidents staff, and from start to finish was successful except, in his own home. He knew a lot of the truth of the Word as shared here and his pastoral counselor was becoming very frustrat-ed because they weren’t making any progress. So in praying, the counselor asked the Lord, “What’s standing in the way of this man’s being broken?” The next day as they discussed that very subject, he said, “Jesus was made of no reputation, how would you like to be made of no reputation? “NO!” he said! “Why not?” He responded, “I’ve spent my whole life trying to make something out of myself.” Then he remembered he was born in a little town in the South where his Dad was the town drunk. And he was embarrassed as a child for time and time again he and his mother would go to the bars and get Dad and bring him home. He vowed as a little boy that he would restore the family name and he did. But he was failing in his marriage. And when he began to realize that he had to be made of no reputation, just as Jesus was, he got on his knees, humbled himself, and agreed -- surrendering his right.

 
Contributed By:
Steve Malone
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

YOU KNOW CHRISTMAS IS ALMOST HERE WHEN:

10) There are more pine needles on your carpet than on your tree
9) The credit card is smoked along with the turkey and ham.
8) It’s A Wonderful Life has been shown for the 13th time
7) A trip to the mall and back is more challenging then the Indy 500
6) The Salvation Army bell ringers start accepting credit cards
5) You are pulling an all-nighter because of the words
"Some Assembly Required"
4) Your Christmas list is written in black while your check book balance is written in red.
3) Santa’s belly is not the only thing shaking like a bowl full of jelly.
2) The NFL referees are not the only ones giving away games
1) The infamous fruitcake returns from it’s 12 months of hiding.

 
Contributed By:
Richard  McNair
 
Scripture:
 

View linked Sermon

Love is the key. Joy is love singing. Peace is love resting. Long-suffering is love enduring. Kindness is love’s touch. Goodness is love’s character. Faithfulness is love’s habit. Gentleness is love’s self-forgetfulne...

Continue reading with a Free PRO Subscription...

 
Contributed By:
Rob Short
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

In 1994, two Christian missionaries answered an invitation from the Russian Department of Education to teach morals and ethics in a large orphanage. About 100 boys and girls who had been abandoned, abused, and left in the care of a government-run program were in the orphanage.

It was nearing Christmas and they decided to tell them the story of Christmas. It would be the first time these children had heard the story of the birth of Christ. They told them about Mary and Joseph arriving in Bethlehem. Finding no room in the inn, the couple went to a stable, where the baby Jesus was born and placed in a manger. Throughout the story, the children and orphanage staff sat in amazement as they listened. Some sat on the edges of their stools, trying to grasp every word.

When the story was finished, they gave the children three small pieces of cardboard to make a crude manger. Each child was given a small paper square, cut from yellow napkins that they had brought with them since no coloured paper was available in the city.

Following instructions, the children tore the paper and carefully laid strips in the manger for straw. Small squares of flannel, cut from a worn-out nightgown an American lady was throwing away as she left Russia, were used for the baby’s blanket. A doll-like baby was cut from tan felt which the missionaries had also brought with them.

It was all going smoothly until one of the missionaries sat down at a table to help a 6 year old boy named Misha. He had finished his manger. When the missionary looked at the little boy’s manger, she was startled to see not one, but two babies in the manger. Quickly, she called for the translator to ask Misha why there were two babies in the manger.

Crossing his arms in front of him and looking at this completed manger scene, Misha began to repeat the story very seriously. For such a young boy, who had only heard the Christmas story once, he related the happenings accurately until he came to the part where Mary put the baby
Jesus in the manger.

Then Misha started to ad-lib. He made up his own ending. He said, "And when Maria laid the baby in the manger, Jesus looked at me and asked me if I had a place to stay. I told him I have no mamma and I have no papa, so I don’t have any place to stay. Then Jesus told me I could stay with him. But I told him I couldn’t, because I didn’t have a gift to give him like everybody else did.

"But I wanted to stay with Jesus so much, so I thought about what I had that maybe I could use for a gift. I thought maybe if I kept him warm, that would be a good gift. So I asked Jesus, 'If I keep you warm, will that be a good enough gift' And Jesus told me, 'If you keep me warm, that will be the best gift anybody ever gave me.'

"So I got into the manger, and then Jesus looked at me and he told me I could stay with him--for always."

As little Misha finished his story, his eyes brimmed full of tears that splashed down his little cheeks. Putting his hand over his face, his head dropped to the table and his shoulders shook as he sobbed and sobbed.

The little orphan had found someone who would never abandon nor abuse him, someone who would stay with him--FOR ALWAYS.

 
Contributed By:
Andrew Chan
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

There was a certain old recluse who lived deep in the mountains of Colorado. When he died, distant relatives came from the city to collect his valuables. Upon arriving, all they saw was an old shack with an outhouse beside it. Inside the shack, next to the rock fireplace, was an old cooking pot and his mining equipment. A cracked table with a three-legged chair stood guard by a tiny window, and a kerosene lamp served as the centerpiece for the table. In a dark corner of the little room was a dilapidated cot with a threadbare bedroll on it.

They picked up some of the old relics and started to leave. As they were driving away, an old friend of the recluse, on his mule, flagged them down. “Do you mind if I help myself to what’s left in my friend’s cabin?” he asked. “Go right ahead,” they replied. After all, they thought, what inside that shack could be worth anything?

The old friend entered the shack and walked directly over the table. He reached under it and lifted one of the floor boards. He then proceeded to take out all the gold his friend had discovered over the past 53 years – enough to have built a palace. The recluse died with only his friend knowing his true worth. As the friend looked out of the little window and watched the cloud of dust behind the relative’s car disappear, he said, “They should have got to know him better.

I wonder, as we reflect on this Good Friday, as we watch the Lamb, Jesus Christ, who suffered and died a criminal’s death 2000 years ago that we too have missed out on the gold. Do we know our Friend’s (Jesus) true worth? Do we treat Him as if he’s some old relic of history that lived somewhere in strife-torn Middle East long, long time ago in a galaxy far, far way? What’s that gotta do with me? Yeah, sure He died, and maybe he’s some tragic hero and we drive away, walk away empty from this assembly this day or do we wanna walk out here with the gold? Have we missed the gold? Will someone one day say of us that we should have got to know Jesus better?

 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

Tags: Shepherd (add tag)
 
Rate this Resource

Some years ago at a drawing-room function, one of England’s leading actors was asked to recite for the pleasure of his fellow guests. He consented and asked if there was anything special that his audience would like to hear. After a moment’s pause, an old clergyman present said: "Could you, sir, recite to us the Twenty-third Psalm?" A strange look passed over the actor’s face; he paused for a moment, and then said: "I can, and I will, upon one condition; and that is that after I have recited it, you, my friend, will do the same." "I," said the clergyman, in surprise. "But I am not an elocutionist. However, you wish it, I will do so." Impressively, the great actor began the psalm. His voice and his intonation were perfect. He held his audience spellbound; and as he finished, a great burst of applause broke from the guests. Then, as it died away, the old clergyman arose and began the psalm. His voice was not remarkable; his intonation was not faultless. When he had finished, no sound of applause broke the silence, but there was not a dry eye in the room, and many heads were bowed. Then the actor rose to his feet again. His voice shook as he laid his hand upon the shoulder of the old clergyman and said: "I reached your eyes and ears, my friends; he reached your hearts. The difference is just this: I know the Twenty-third Psalm, but he knows the Shepherd."

(from "The War Cry")

 
Contributed By:
Kevin Higgins
 
Scripture:
 

View linked Sermon

There is a legend which recounts the return of Jesus to glory after His time on earth. Even in heaven He bore the marks of His earthly pilgrimage with its cruel cross and shameful death. The angel Gabriel approached Him and said, "Master, you must have suffered terribly for men down there."
"I did," He said.
"And," continued Gabriel, "do they know all about how you loved them and what you did for them?"
"Oh, no," said Jesus, "not yet. Right now only a handful of people in Palestine know."
Gabriel was perplexed. "Then what have you done," he asked, "to let everyone know about your love for them?"
Jesus said, "I’ve asked Peter, James, John, and a few more friends to tell other people about me. Those who are told will in turn tell other people about me, and my story will be spread to the farthest reaches of the globe. Ultimately, all of mankind will have heard about my life and what I have done."
Gabriel frowned and looked rather skeptical. He knew well what poor stuff men were made of. "Yes," he said, "but what if Peter and James and John grow weary? What if the people who come after them forget? What if way down through the centuri...

Continue reading with a Free PRO Subscription...

 
Contributed By:
Russell Brownworth
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

A little girl was pushing the limits of her mother’s very last nerve. Mom was nearing the end of a hectic season of cooking, cleaning, shopping, wrapping and church stuff. She was also nearing the breaking point with her little pre-schooler.
Finally the little girl was bathed and ready for bed. As she knelt to say her prayers, Mom listened as her sweet three year old theologian "customized" her evening prayer, ...And forgive us our Christmases, as we forgive those who Christmas against us!

 
Contributed By:
Troy Borst
 
Scripture:

Suggest a Scripture Reference

 
Rate this Resource

View linked Sermon

OPENING ILLUSTRATION… Mother’s Day Background, Pulpit Helps 1991

It was a woman named Anna M. Jarvis who first suggested the national observance of an annual day honoring all mothers because she had loved her own mother so dearly. At a memorial service for her mother on May 10, 1908, Miss Jarvis gave a carnation (her mother’s favorite flower) to each person who attended.
Within the next few years, the idea of a day to honor mothers gained popularity, and Mother’s Day was observed in a number of large cities in the U.S. On May 9, 1914, by an act of Congress, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day. He established the day as a time for "public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country."

 
<< Previous
1
...
New Better Preaching Articles
Featured Resource
Today's Most Popular
Sponsored Links