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Illustration results for honesty

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A November Gallup Poll asked Americans to rate the honesty and ethical standards of professions. The top six rated professions are: nurses (82%), pharmacists (67%), medical doctors (65%), high school teachers (64%), policemen (61%), and clergy (54%). The two lowest rated are Telemarketers (7%) and Car Salesmen (8%).(Gallup Alert 12/5/05)

 
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Honesty Poll Revealing: Gallup has discovered that Clergy rank only 6th among most honest professionals. The question: “Which professions are the most honest?”
Nurses 73%
Pharmacists 69%
Veterinarians 63%
Medical Dr.’s 58%
K-12 Teachers 57%
Clergy 56%
Judges 53% (Gallup 3/00)


 
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Honesty Ranking: Firefighters top the annual CNN/USA Today Gallup Poll ranking the honesty, integrity and ethical standards of various professions. 90% of Americans rated them “high” or “very high.” Close behind firefighters in the ratings were nurses (84%), members of the military (81%), policemen (68%), pharmacists (68%), and medical doctors (66%). The clergy came in seventh, scoring 64%. (PWB 12/6/01)

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The Wall Separating Church And Economics is being breached. “More and more scholars have been using conventional economic methods to understand the way in which religion relates to the rest of society, and to the economy in particular,” says George Mason University professor Laurence R. Iannaccone. In a paper published in the American Sociological Review, Robert J. Barro and Rachel M. McCleary, a Harvard based husband-and-wife team, set out to investigate the correlation between variables like church attendance and belief in heaven and hell and comparative economic growth rates from ‘65 to ‘95. The study seems to confirm the assumption that greater economic development is associated with less religiosity. Why? Religion can affect economics by fostering beliefs that influence productivity-enhancing traits like thrift, hard work and honesty. A wide-spread feeling that such behavior may ultimately be rewarded (a belief in heaven), or that a lack of such behavior may be punished (a belief in hell) may spur economic growth. If more people and resources are devoted to holding religious services without producing the desired output (a higher level of belief), that tends to lessen productivity in an economy. In other words, countries’ economies may perform best when people have relatively higher levels of religious belief than participation. Amo...

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Honesty Pays: A survey by Right Management Consultants found that employees valued honesty as the most important management trait. (CFO 2/03)


 
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Matthew Kratz
 
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Illustration: Needs Are Different
Perhaps our understanding for marriage is to give our spouse what we feel is best.
Dr. Willard Harley, a Massachusetts psychologist, surveyed the perceived basic needs of men and women in marriage and found that the perceived needs are completely different. According to Dr. Harley’s survey,
The top five basic needs of the female in marriage are:
1. Affection
2. Communication
3. Openness/Honesty
4. Financial Support
5. Family Commitment

The male’s top five basic needs are:
1. Sexual Fulfillment
2. Recreational Companionship
3. An Attractive Wife
4. Domestic Support
5. Admiration

Looking at both lists, it becomes obvious that if we give our spouses in relation to our perceived needs, hoping to receive the same in return, we will miss the mark every time. Therefore, instead of giving in relation to what we need, we must strive to give what our spouses need.
From Bad Beginnings to Happy Endings, by Ed Young (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publ., 1994), pp. 120-121.

 
Contributed By:
Tom Feola
 
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MICKEY MANTLE'S SALVATION STORY

The #7 is for the Mick, or Mickey Mantle, who played for the New York Yankees. 
 
Why do I bring this out about Mickey Mantle.  Well 1st of all without a team playing with Him Mick would have won zero World Series.  But because of a team effort Mickey played in 12 World Series, and won 7 World Championships.
And because of a team effort they won 113 and only lost 54 in 1961.

2nd. Because of a certain player on his team, who let his light shine, Mick might not be in heaven today.  Here’s the story.

Remember, it wasn’t how Mick started his life but how he finished it. 
 
You might have read the stories how Mick would come to games drunk, He had a problem with alcohol and it cost him his life.
 
Mickey Charles Mantle (The Mick)
Born: October 20, 1931
Died: August 13, 1995 (Aged 63)
Some of his awards
1956  Major League Player of the Year
1956 AL MVP
1956 AL Triple Crown
1957 AL MVP
1962 AL MVP
1965 ML Hutch Award

He was one of the most compelling athletic heroes in American history. Long after he'd hung up his fabled pin striped uniform, grown men would stammer and stutter in his presence and faithful fans would pay outlandish prices for his memorabilia. His achievements were many, but they cannot explain his enduring popularity. His legion of admirers felt a deep emotional attachment to this man who moved with such fluid grace and raw power. They loved Mickey Mantle.

His statistics are staggering--536 home runs, 1,509 RBIs, .298 career batting average, seven world championships, and three MVP awards--and they are all the more impressive when we consider how the Hall of Famer courageously battled chronic, painful injuries during his 18 years with the New York Yankees. In addition, he won the Triple Crown in 1956--a .353 batting average, 52 HRs, and 130 RBIs. In 1961, he hammered 54 homers, just six shy of Babe Ruth's record.

But these numbers pale when compared to what happened in the harsh summer of '95 when his heart took over in that desperate final inning. Faced with an aggressive cancer, he displayed incredible courage, humility, even humor as he battled for his life. And when he chose to drag his frail body in front of a mass of microphones and address the public, there was not a trace of self-pity in his words--only heartfelt pleas to avoid the mistakes he had made. "Don't be like me," he humbly declared, "I'm no role model!" But despite his flaws, Mantle remained a hero to his multitude of fans, and due to his honesty gained many new ones.

At age 19, Mickey Mantle left the lead mines of Oklahoma for the bright lights of New York City. Unfortunately, those lights cast an eerie shadow over his life. After Mickey's first season, his father, Mutt Mantle, died of Hodgkins disease at 40. His grandfather and two of his uncles also died to the same disease before their 40th birthdays. As a result, a growing fear of dying young haunted the budding superstar. He would talk long into the night with close teammates, confiding to them this nagging fear.

Convinced an early funeral was his fate, though often joking about it, he played hard and partied even harder. For him there was no tomorrow. Tragically, this attitude led to a 40-year bout with alcohol that caused his body to grow older before its time and clouded his mind. Many criticized his self-destructive lifestyle, saying it sabotaged the greatest combination of power and speed the game had ever seen. In autumn of his life, Mantle came to agree with those critics, admitting that his drug of choice, alcohol, kept him from reaching his full potential--as a player and a person. Mickey Mantle had learned the hard lesson that a man reap what he sows.

Finally in 1994, at the urging of his family and friends, Mickey Mantle sought help for his addiction. After checking himself into the Betty Ford Center, he was able to win his long battle with the bottle. But he knew something was still missing in his life. He just wasn't sure what it was.

In June of '95, doctors discovered that cancer had destroyed Mantle's liver. He was fortunate to receive a transplant, and for a while it seemed as if the greatest switch hitter of all time would live to fight another day. Then doctors found that cancer remained in his body, and he began chemotherapy. Mickey knew he was facing death. During the All-Star break in Dallas, he picked up the phone and called his old friend and teammate, former Yankee second baseman Bobby Richardson--a committed Christian. Mickey asked him to pray for him over the telephone. A few weeks later when the doctors had discovered that the cancer aggresively spread, Mickey's family asked Bobby if he would come visit him.

His death was imminent. After entering the hospital room, Richardson went over to Mantle's bed and took his hand. Locking his eyes on him, Bobby said, "Mickey, I love you, and I want you to spend eternity in heaven with me." Mantle smiled said, "Bobby, I've been wanting to tell you that I have trusted Jesus Christ as my Savior." Faced with the crushing weight of his sin against a holy God and its dire consequence-- eternal seperation from God--Mickey had asked for and received the forgiveness he so desperately needed. For Richardson, news of his conversion felt like cool rain after a summer drought, and brought tears to his eyes. For years, he had talked to Mickey about the Lord Jesus, but to no avail. Now, in the final inning of his life, the Mick had won his greatest victory--more glorious than any of his tape measured home runs.

When asked later how he knew he would spend eternity with God in heaven, Mickey, after some reflection, quoted John 3:16 from the Bible: "For God so loved the world that He gave His one and only Son, that whosoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life."

At Mickey's funeral, Bobby Richardson told 2,000 mourners and a national TV audience that there are only two groups of people: those who say "yes" to Christ and those who say "no". He added that, since none of us knows when he will face his own final inning, saying "maybe" is really saying "no". The Bible confirms this when it says, "Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life, but whoever rejects the Son will not see life, for God's wrath remains on him" (John 3:36).

 
Contributed By:
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LYING

Penn State researcher Dr. Nancy Darling reports 98% of teens reported lying to their parents in a recent study. They lied about what they spent their allowances on, whether they’d started dating, what clothes they put on away from the house, what movie they went to, and whom they went with. They lied about alcohol and drug use, about whether they were hanging out with friends their parents disapproved of, about how they spent their afternoons while their parents were at work, about whether chaperones were in attendance at a party or whether they rode in cars driven by drunken teens. Yet 98% of teens say trust and honesty are essential in a personal relationship. Depending on their ages, 96 to 98% say lying is morally wrong.

What’s happening? A child who is going to lie must recognize the truth, intellectually conceive of an alternate reality, and be able to convincingly sell that new reality to someone else. So, if your four-year-old is a good liar, it’s a strong sign she’s got brains. And it’s the smart, savvy kid who’s most at risk of becoming a habitual liar.

The most disturbing reas...

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Moral Values? Religion & Ethics Newsweekly’s recent survey found most U.S. families place a higher priority on personal values than on divisive social issues. 18% named moral values as the concern that worries them most. But when asked what “moral values” means to them, 36% said personal values such as honesty and responsibility. Only 10% said “moral values” means opinions on a social issue, such as abortion or gay marriage while 25% said “family values,” such as protecting children. (Religion Ethics Newsletter 10/21/05)



 
Contributed By:
Troy Borst
 
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A USA Today poll found that only 56% of American teach honesty to their children. And a Louis Harris poll turned up the distressing fact that 65% of high school students would cheat on an important exam. Recently a noted physician appeared on a network news-and-talk show and proclaimed, "Lying is an important part of social life, and children ...

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