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preaching article Should You Preach On A Topic That Doesn't Stir Your Passions?

Should You Preach On A Topic That Doesn't Stir Your Passions?

based on 3 ratings
Oct 8, 2015


If you listen to enough of a pastor’s sermons you will hear a few things:

1. What he is passionate about.

2. What he struggles with.

3. What he wants to become.

Pastor’s tend to stick with what they know or like. If I had my way, I’d preach on a New Testament letter every time. Other guys would preach from a gospel whenever given the chance. A few will throw in some Old Testament wrath of God.

Sunday, as we are going through Galatians, we got to a topic that I haven’t preached a lot on. It isn’t because I don’t care about it or don’t think it is important. Truthfully, it hasn’t come up in any of the series we’ve done. It’s the topic of approval.

Now, we all struggle with approval to some degree. We all care what people think, to some degree. It is just different for everyone.

For me, my struggles center around control and power. I don’t care too much if you like me, but I do care a lot if I lose.

If a pastor isn’t careful, they will only preach on the things they find important. This can be good and bad.

It’s good because it should mean a pastor is passionate about what he is communicating. It’s good because his sermons will tend to be more thorough because it’s on a topic he likes or has read a lot about (because he struggles with it).

If you aren’t careful though, you will end up missing an enormous part of your church. Your church doesn’t have the same struggles you have. They don’t have the same temptations or history or baggage that you do.

Because of that, they need to hear sermons about things you aren’t as passionate about.

This is one of the benefits to preaching through books of the Bible. You can’t skip anything. Now, choosing to preach through Galatians, I knew I was going to hit the topics of legalism, approval and moralism. It is the theme of the book. It is one of the reasons we chose it, because we haven’t had a lot of sermons on those topics.

Pastors will also stay away from topics they don’t want to talk about. Maybe a pastor is more of a shepherd than a vision caster, so he won’t preach a lot about vision. This will lead the church to be aimless. Or, he’s a vision caster who can’t stop talking and no one gets cared for because he never preaches on it. A pastor isn’t an evangelist, so there is no talk on evangelism, just discipleship and growing. Or the other way around.

If you simply talk about what you like, care about, are passionate about or things you know about, you will keep your church from hearing all that God wants to teach them.

Josh Reich is the lead pastor of Revolution Church in Tucson, AZ, which is trying to live out the rhythms of Jesus. The church's dream is to "help people find their way back to God."

Talk about it...

Larry Easton avatar
Larry Easton
0 days ago
There is a difference between a "calling" and a "job." I have been called to preach whatever the Holy Spirit directs me to preach, whether I like it or not. He ALWAYS manages to make me be excited about what He gives me. God is great, and He always provides.
Larry Easton avatar
Larry Easton
0 days ago
There is a difference between a "calling" and a "job." I have been called to preach whatever the Holy Spirit directs me to preach, whether I like it or not. He ALWAYS manages to make me be excited about what He gives me. God is great, and He always provides.
William Howard avatar
William Howard
0 days ago
Amen. Amen. Amen
William Howard avatar
William Howard
0 days ago
"You can?t skip anything." This is a quote from your post. If we have indeed been called, our "job" is to operate in our calling. As instructed in the Word - 2 Timothy 4:2 ?Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all longsuffering and doctrine. This we do as directed by the Holy Ghost.
Steve Miller avatar
Steve Miller
0 days ago
Beauty of expositional preaching is the fact that a pastor covers it all! There are going to be topics that will be in his comfort zone of familiarity and passion as well as topics that will challenge his theology, personal interests and stylistic preferences. Not only does expostional preaching benefit the preacher, but the congregation will appreciate hearing the "full counsel" of God's word.
Lawrence Webb avatar
Lawrence Webb
0 days ago
To the degree that we get into a text and let the text "get into us," we should build a measure of passion for the message of the hour, whether it's one of our "sugar sticks" or one that isn't high on our list of preferences. In my later years, I have become acquainted with and appreciative of the Revised Common Lectionary. I don't always follow one of the readings, but I do consider them as an option in my sermon preparation. This can be a discipline for turning to texts we tend to neglect. Each week, the lectionary offers a Psalm, another Old Testament reading, a Gospel, and an Epistle. This can encourage a wider choice for our texts and sermons. You can google these listings. Approximately half the year, they follow events in the life and ministry of Jesus.

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