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preaching article Are We More Invested In Bringing People to Church or Jesus?

Are We More Invested In Bringing People to Church or Jesus?

based on 1 rating
Feb 8, 2016


Church attendance should be a tool to help people draw closer to Jesus. Not the other way around.

I have a confession to make.

As a pastor, I have too much invested in getting people to attend church.

My salary depends on it.

My reputation depends on it.

My sense of self-worth depends on it.

All to a much larger degree than I'm comfortable with.

And I'm not alone.

Come to Church? Or Come to Jesus?

The way most church systems are structured, many pastors have a greater stake in getting people to come to church than getting them to come to Jesus.

In fact, sometimes it’s detrimental to our bottom-line to have people draw too close to Jesus.

When people are more committed to the church than to Jesus, they will

  • Attend regularly and quietly
  • Spend all their volunteer hours at the church
  • Give all their charitable donations to the church
  • Be happy with the status quo

When people are more committed to Jesus than our churches, they might

  • Volunteer for some of their ministry outside the church walls
  • Find other places that are worthy of some of their charitable donations
  • Leave when God calls them into full-time ministry
  • Challenge the status quo
  • Make us feel threatened by reducing the clergy/laity dividing line

But we have to do it anyway.

We have to point people to Jesus more than to the church.

Church Is a Tool, Not a Goal

Overcoming our tendency to emphasize church more than we emphasize Jesus won’t be easy. And I’m not in a position to point any fingers. I’m as much a part of the problem as anyone.

But I have a longing. For more. For better. For deeper.

I want to live, preach and disciple people in such a way that they're committed to Jesus, not just their church.

Of course, church is valuable. It matters that we participate in a local body of believers through worship, fellowship, discipleship and ministry. If it didn’t matter, I’d leave the pastorate today.

We're not commanded to bring people to church. We're commanded to disciple them into a deeper relationship with Jesus.

But we're not commanded to bring people to church. We're commanded to disciple them into a deeper relationship with Jesus.

Church attendance is not the goal. It's a tool to help us reach the goal.

As a pastor, I have to remind myself of that on a regular basis.

A Matter of Pastoral Integrity

I don’t want to pastor a group of nice, polite church attenders, or waste my time entertaining bored believers.

I want to participate in the gathering, training, and releasing of an army of Jesus-worshiping, people-loving, barrier-breaking world-changers.

Sometimes it feels like my salary depends on the former. My integrity depends on the latter.

I also want my bills paid. But making pastoral decisions that have more to do with holding on to our salary packages than making disciples has made much of the western church anemic.

The church I pastor is no exception to that. At least not as much of an exception as it should be. That’s not their fault as much as it is mine.

Jesus promised that if we serve his kingdom first, “all these things” will be taken care of.

Let’s trust him to do that and turn the church loose.

 

Enjoyed this post by Karl Vaters? Read 7 Bad Reasons to Leave Your Church.

Karl Vaters is the author of The Grasshopper Myth: Big Churches, Small Churches and the Small Thinking That Divides Us. He’s been in pastoral ministry for over 30 years and has been the lead pastor of Cornerstone Christian Fellowship in Fountain Valley, California for over 20 years. He’s also the founder of NewSmallChurch.com, a blog that encourages, connects and equips innovative Small Church pastors.

Talk about it...

Dorothy Hall avatar
Dorothy Hall
0 days ago
Phil Sheffield avatar
Phil Sheffield
0 days ago
Yes we need to eradicate the idea that we are going to church and replace it with the reality that we are the church and refocus on becoming a functioning member of the body of Christ that living sacrifice, holy and acceptable unto Him.
David Nwogu avatar
David Nwogu
0 days ago
Great Karl! This calls for some sort of flexibility and being spiritually generous in the way some of our leaders/founders hold their members. Thanks for this godly view of church membership and the believer's commitment to Christ.
David Barnes avatar
David Barnes
0 days ago
While I agree to a point with the idea of commitment to Christ rather than to a church, THE CHURCH is the body of Christ, so bringing people to the church IS bringing them to Christ. And the idea of doing ministry apart from a connection to a local church is unbiblical and unfruitful.

So, what did you think?


Thank you.