|  Forgot password?

Building A House!

(2)

Sermon shared by George Dillahunty

April 2009
Summary: Motherís Day (2009) What better theme for a Motherís Day sermon than building a house of life in the context of the family!
Denomination: Church of God
Audience: General adults
Sermon:
Rev. George R. Dillahunty
Freedom Fellowship (COG)
685 Grant Avenue
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452-3047

April 17, 2009

Text: Luke 6:46-49 (King James Version)

"And why call ye Me, íLord, Lord, and do not the things which I say? (v. 47) Whosoever cometh to Me, and heareth My sayings, and doeth them, I will shew you to whom he is like. (v. 48) He is like a man which built an house, and digged deep, and laid the foundation on a rock: and when the flood arose, the stream beat vehemently upon that house, and could not shake it: for it was founded upon a rock. (v. 49) But he that heareth, and doeth not, is like a man that without a foundation built an house upon the earth; against which the stream did beat vehemently, and immediately it fell; and the ruin of that house was great."

Topic: Building A House!

Motherís Day (2009) What better theme for Motherís Day than building a house of life in the context of the family! Jesus, the Christ, tells us that there is only one way to build a house that will be secure against the storms that will always threaten. We have to dig down deep and lay a foundation on solid rock! Without a firm foundation, the house will be shattered by the storms that come!

To be sure, Jesus, the Christ, is talking about building the foundation of our lives on Him and the rock of His Word! The author, Robert Fulghum, in his book entitled, "All I Really Need to Know, I Learned in Kindergarten," writes:

"All I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be, I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate-school mountain, but there in the sandpile at Sunday School. These are the things I learned:

Share everything. Play fair. Donít hit people. Put things back where you found them. Clean up your own mess. Donít take things that arenít yours. Say youíre sorry when you hurt somebody. Wash your hands before you eat. Flush. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you. Take a nap every afternoon. Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the styrofoam cup. The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we all are like that. Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and even the little seed in the styrofoam cup - they all die. So do we.

Think what a better world it would be if we all - the whole world - had cookies and milk about 3 oíclock every afternoon and then lay down with our blankies for a nap.

Or, if all governments had as a basic policy to always put things back where they found them and to clean up their own mess. And it is still true, no matter how old [we] are - when [we] go out into the world, it is best to hold hands and stick together." Isnít that something? It is a touching, beautiful, and poignant piece because it is so profoundly true!

We all know that the early years of a child are so very important! Our attitudes - our personalities - our values - our habits - our principles - our self-esteem - and, to some degree, our IQís are shaped powerfully by what happens to us in the first years of early childhood! And, to be sure, mothers have the most to do with how we turn out as adults - because they are the home builders - the teachers - and the ones who influence us the most during the early years!

So, tell me, preacher, "What foundations are we to lay for the house that we are building in our families? Perhaps,
Comments and Shared Ideas

Join the discussion

  |  Forgot password?
Sign in to join the discussion New to SermonCentral? Create an account
New Better Preaching Articles
Featured Resource
Today's Most Popular
Sponsored Links