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Doctrine and the Christian Life

(64)

Sermon shared by James Boyd

February 2003
Summary: In this article, I want to look at what the Bible itself says about doctrine, and present a balanced look at the vital role that Bible doctrine plays in the Christian life.
Denomination: Charismatic
Audience: Believer adults
Sermon:
Jesus answered them and said "My doctrine is not mine, but His that sent me." (John 7:16)
But speak thou the things which become sound doctrine. (Titus 2:1)


Mention the word "doctrine" among church circles, and you will get a variety of different responses. On one hand, there are those who treat doctrine as if it were a dirty word. To them, doctrine is not "politically correct." The basic idea they uphold is that "It really doesnít matter what you believe, as long as you are sincere." This notion is very dangerous, as it undermines the absolute Truth and authority of Godís Word.
On the other hand there is also a tendency among some others to almost deify doctrine. This view is equally dangerous, as it subtly makes doctrine, rather than Jesus, the object of faith, and reduces Christianity to simply being mental assent to creedal formulas, rather than a living relationship with a Living God.

In this article, I want to look at what the Bible itself says about doctrine, and present a balanced look at the vital role that Bible doctrine plays in the Christian life.

Donít buy the misconception that studying Bible doctrine is some dry, shallow, laborious pursuit. Many of these misconceptions come from the tendency to separate "doctrinal" study from "practical" study. I believe this is largely a false distinction. When approached properly, Bible doctrine is the most practical thing there is. You can always count on fresh bread from Godís table!

Take, for example, simple statements such as "God loves you" or "God is Love." You may not have thought about these as being doctrinal statements, but they are, very much so. Think for a moment about how much Truth is wrapped up in even the most basic expression of Godís Love. You can chew on John 3:16 for a very long time!

Beginning a relationship with God doesnít require much doctrinal knowledge. The plan of salvation is very simple. However, once a person has committed his or her life to Jesus, the next step is to "Grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ." (2 Peter 3:18) Thatís where doctrine comes in.

Studying Bible doctrine will help settle and establish us in the faith (Ephesians 4: 14-15,) it helps to keep us on track spiritually (1 Timothy 4: 13-16,) helps us to accurately reflect Godís Truth (2 Timothy 2:15,) and equips us for service to Him (2 Timothy 3: 13-17; Ephesians 6: 10-17.)

Except for the Book of Philemon, every Book in the New Testament contains some sort of exhortation to pursue sound doctrine. Scripture also tells us that a person who does not have the doctrine of Christ does not have God (2 John 9,) and that a person who teaches doctrine contrary to that of the apostles is to be accursed (Galatians 1:9!) That is pretty strong language! To say that doctrine is not important is to say that Truth is not important. God is Truth, and He relates to His people based on Truth. What we believe ABOUT God has everything to do with how we relate TO God.

On the other hand, Christianity is much, much more than simply giving mental affirmation to a set of doctrinal creeds. You can know and believe all of the right doctrines, and still be totally lost. It has been said that many people will miss Heaven by 18 inches: Having the Truth in their heads, but not in their hearts.

Knowledge of the Bible is vitally important, to be sure. The Bible teaches us
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