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“Give Me A Man” 1 Samuel 17:10: Sermon on Biblical Manhood

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Sermon shared by Tim White

May 2011
Summary: David and Saul faced the same giant obstacle to leadership, but only David revealed Biblical manhood.
Denomination: Baptist
Audience: General adults
Sermon:
Goliath’s had no idea what he was asking for when he bellowed like an out of tune tuba: “GIVE ME A MAN!”

Wayne Grudem and John Piper identified and addressed a problem in leadership back in 1991 which is still relevant:

“A controversy of major proportions has spread through the church. It began over 20 years ago in society at large. Sense then an avalanche of feminist literature has argued that there need be no difference between men’s and women’s, indeed, that to support gender-based role differences is unjust discrimination. Within evangelical Christianity, the counterpart to this movement has been the increasing tendency to oppose any unique leadership role for men in the home and the church” (John Piper and Wayne Grudem. Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood).

With this controversy over male leadership, some questions need to be answered:

What is Biblical manhood? What is masculinity? Who is a man? What is a man? When does a boy become a man? This last question is pertinent to our story in 1 Samuel 17 because it could be described as shepherd boy challenging a veteran soldier in combat.

1. A boy does not become a man necessarily at age 18 or 21. David in the story before us is a young teen acting manly.

2. A boy does not become a man when he reaches a certain physique. David was an underdeveloped youth. Saul was head and shoulders taller than everyone and he was no man in the biblical sense.

3. A boy does not become a man when he gets a title. Saul had the title “King” but he was not kingly.

4. A boy becomes a man when he begins to assert spiritual influence according to our model in David.

Whether Goliath knew it or not, he communicated through his speech, “Give me a man,” the theme of 1 and 2 Samuel. This is a characteristic of narratives. In 1 Samuel 1:8, Elkanah spoke the theme of barrenness in chapter 1 in his dialogue to Hannah in 1: 8. In the Ark of the Covenant Narrative (1 Samuel 4-7), the theme is announced in the first words in 4:3. Sometimes the author will use the narrative to prepare us to hear the theme through the dialogue of a Bible character.

God sovereignly raises up leaders. In 1 and 2 Samuel, God raised up three men:

1. Samuel in chapters 1-7. The Transition to Leadership
2. Saul in chapters 8-15. The Tragedy of Leadership
3. David in chapters 16-2 Samuel. The Triumph and Trouble of Leadership

In chapter 17, two men, Saul and David, confront the same test of leadership, Goliath, but only one shows true manhood.

1. Saul shows us What Leadership and Manhood are NOT in 17:1-11.

Israel and the Philistines have arrayed their armies for battle. The Philistine giant warrior swaggers out. Chuck Swindol said that Goliath was like the cross-eyed discus thrower. He did not set any records but he sure kept the fans awake.

Physical descriptions in Biblical narratives are rare. The reason for this lack of interest in a person’s image was clearly stated by the Lord to Samuel when he was
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