8221; They came and saw where He was staying and remained with Him that day – now it was about the tenth hour (according to the Roman method of the day beginning at midnight, it would have been ten in the morning.)

One of the two who heard John speak and followed Him was Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother. He found his own brother Simon and said to him, “We have found the Messiah (Jesus Christ), and he brought him to Jesus. When Jesus looked at him He said, you are Simon, the son of Jonah. You shall be called Cephas which is translated a stone. The term Cephas means a small rock in Aramaic which is translated “Peter” in Greek, or Petros. Jesus’ assignment of the name Cephas, or Peter to Simon occurred at the outset of His ministry. The statement not only is predictive of what Peter would be called but also declarative of how Jesus would transform his character and use him in relationship to the foundation of the church.

We read in the Gospel of Matthew that Jesus refers to Peter as the rock and “On this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.” And when Jesus referred to Peter as the rock in Matthew, the Greek was “Petra” which means a foundation builder. So a man originally referred to as a small rock, became known as a man with boulder-like strength and faith to carry out Christ’s commission for the church. How important is a name?

I would like you to think about your name, and how God can use you as He used Peter. When Jesus first called Peter, He left everything He had and followed Him. God has called each of you by name. Do we do the same? Do we trust without doubt? Do we have faith that could move mountains?

People are significant and we can make a difference. A week ago yesterday, June 6th was the 65th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, “D-Day” during World War II. Where were you that day? If you go to Normandy today, spread across the wind swept hills, you’ll find rows and rows of white crosses. We’re free today because during the three month battle of Normandy, nearly fifty-three thousand people paid the ultimate price to defeat Nazi tyranny. No fewer than 9,400 grave markers overlook Omaha Beach, many of them bearing the names of men who died during the first hours of this invasion in France. Beneath every white marker lies a person of significance because each one had an impact on the rest of history, each one made a difference. It is a very moving place to be. Visitors frequently weep quietly because there the real heroes of the war are silently honored. If you’ve made a trip to Washington DC and stood before the Viet Nam memorial you’ll experience the same. Name after name listed on the wall, men and women of significance who made a difference. What about you.

Chuck Swindoll, Pastor, prolific writer and teacher asks two questions in his book entitled