Sermon:
Breakthrough to Blessing (Part 6)
It Is Well: The Blessed Family


Children are a gift from the Lord; they are a real blessing.
—Psalm 127:3 Good News Translation

Your wife shall be like a fruitful vine in the very heart of your house, your children like olive plants all around your table.
—Psalm 128:3 NKJV

Your family is your greatest blessing. God wants you to be happy in your marriage and with your children.

Satan’s attack is centered on the family. You must guard your family with faith so that the enemy cannot steal your joy.

Your family is meant to be a place of hospitality, healing, and security. In 2 Kings 4, the woman of Shunem and her family provide a perfect example of a blessed family.

1. The blessed family honors the presence of God (2 Kings 4:8–10).

This unnamed woman was a notable woman. She respected the anointing in Elisha and reached out to bring it into her home.

She and her husband were also willing to spend the time and money ($20,000 in today’s costs) to build a room for Elisha.

The woman was focused on Elisha’s needs, not her own. Our homes should be open to receive those who give and need ministry. We must be delivered from “entertaining” (impressing others) and become interested in “hosting” (ministering to others).

2. The blessed family receives the favor of God (2 Kings 4:11–17).

Elisha asked the woman what she wanted, and she graciously declined his offer of favors from high officials. She was content with what she had, not greedy for what she could get.

Elisha perceived her deepest desire was for a baby and promised her she would have one in a year. The house of Obed-Edom was blessed for housing the ark of the covenant (2 Sam. 6:11), and the Shunammite woman was blessing for housing Elisha.

Your children are your heritage. In biblical times, a son defended and cared for his widowed mother once her husband was dead. The Shunammite was blessed with something that money could not buy.


3. The blessed family experiences the peace of God (2 Kings 4:18–37).

Time passed, and the child grew up. One day he suffered something like a heat stroke and died. The woman laid him upstairs on Elisha’s bed. She left for Mount Carmel and told her husband, “It will be well” (NASB). In Hebrew, it is shalom, which means peace, quiet, tranquility, and contentment.

Good families pass through storms, trials, and difficulties with their finances, children, jobs, and illnesses. The wonderful thing to know when you are going through a trial is “It will be well!” When she reached Mount Carmel, she said, “It is well.”

Is it well with your marriage?

Is the tone of your communication tender or harsh?
Are you fascinated with your spouse like you were when you were engaged?
Do you respect and honor each other in your roles?
Would you rather spend hours together than away from each other?
Do you agree on parenting and financial decisions?

Is it well with your children?

Have they become