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Jesus—The One and Only

(12)

Sermon shared by Adrian Rogers

June 2011
Summary: A classic sermon by Adrian Rogers about what only Jesus can do for us and for the world.
Denomination: Baptist
Audience: General adults
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law—none. The laws of nature don’t exist. They’re God’s laws; nature obeys them. By Jesus, all things consist. He’s the One who fuels the sun with power. He’s the One who veils the moon with beauty. He’s the One who keeps the stars in their courses.

I wish I had studied astronomy when I was young, because I’m so enthralled by it. I think of the speed of light—186,282 miles per second. That, friend, means that a light beam goes around the earth seven times in one second. If you could turn on a flashlight and shine it around the earth, it would go around the world seven times before you could turn it back off, traveling at 186,000 miles per second. Traveling at that speed, light—it would take it 8 minutes to reach the sun, which is 93 million miles away. It would take it 4 years to reach the nearest star, traveling at the speed of light—4 years to reach the nearest star. Oh, if you were to look out at Proxima Centauri and see that star, know that the light you’re seeing has been 4 years getting here, traveling at the incredible speed of light. And, you just think, friend, that’s just in the Milky Way. The Milky Way, our galaxy—there are 100 billion stars in our galaxy. And, our galaxy, they tell us, is just one of billions of galaxies. Who did all of that? What’s His name? Jesus. Who is it that keeps it all running together?

You probably heard the story of a nuclear physicist who was traveling, going from one grand university to another, lecturing on the complexities of the universe, and nuclear physics, and all of the dynamism in nuclear matter. He had a chauffeur that drove him from school to school. Finally, the chauffeur said, “Listen. You have given that speech so many times—I have listened to it so many times—I’ve memorized it; I could give it.” And, the learned doctor said, “Well, to tell you the truth, I’m getting a little bored. I’ll tell you what, let me put on a chauffeur’s uniform. The next university we go to, you stand up there and give the speech, and I’ll sit out there in the audience and act like the chauffeur.”

They thought it would be jolly good fun. So, the chauffeur got up there in this great university and gave this lecture on nuclear physics, and he was brilliant. He had it down to an ant’s eyelash, but he spoke a little faster than the learned professor. And so, the chancellor of the university said, “Well, I see we’ve finished 20 minutes early. We have time for some questions and answers.” So, one student stood up, and he said, “Sir,” he said, “you know, in the center of the atom there are these protons, and both of them have a positive charge. And, we know that positive charges normally deflect and resist one another, but these seem to cohere. These seem to hang together. Sir, can you tell me why the nucleus of
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