Sermon:
Preparing for War
2 Chronicles 20:1-19

Listening to the news these days can be very confusing. Listening to this newscaster or this editorial, or this broadcast it is hard to see who is right and who is wrong. One time Mother Teresa was asked to join an anti-war rally, being a peace-loving woman they were sure she would jump at that opportunity. She declined, she said she would not be a part of any anti-war rally, but if they held a pro-peace movement she would participate. The idea has to with negative or positive reinforcement. But listening today to the news and we see rallies all over the world protesting war. Seeing some of these reminded me of days of my youth, when my friends, neighbors, and family were in Vietnam. These protestors are out to show that what America is doing is wrong. However with every anti-war protest there is a counter effort in support of war. There is someone who can articulate why action is better than inaction. It is obvious, especially for those of us who serve in armed forces knows, there is more to this than meets the eye. The President, the leaders of the other nations know more than they are telling.

Martin Niemoeller was one of the most respected Protestant leaders in Germany in the early 1930’s. Niemoeller was a decorated U-Boat captain in the First World War and later became a Christian. In 1933, when he became the most high profile of Hitler’s Christian opponents, he was in charge of a prestigious suburban church in Berlin-Dahlem.
Niemoeller was a leader in the mobilization of the Pastors’ Emergency League, in the Synod that denounced the abuses of Adolf Hitler in the famous "Barmen Declaration," and in other visible actions and sermons that finally led to his arrest on July 1, 1937. There were still a few honest judges functioning in Germany, and when the court let him go with a slap on the wrist Hitler personally ordered his incarceration. Niemoeller was in concentration camps, including long periods of solitary confinement, until the end of the war. (Frank H. Littell, First They Came for the Jews)
Martin Niemoeller, reflecting on the atrocities of Adolf Hitler, wrote the following words.
First they came for the communists, and I did not speak out--
because I was not a communist;
Then they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out--
because I was not a socialist;
Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out--
because I was not a trade unionist;
Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out--
because I was not a Jew;
Then they came for me--
and there was no one left to speak out for me.
Is it none of our business when Saddam Hussein “comes” for the weak in his own society? When he threatens and attacks surrounding nations? Is it none of our business that Saddam Hussein is underwriting terrorism’s attacks around the globe? The proponents of President Bush’s efforts say that inaction will reap consequences for America and others far worse