Sermon:
THE DOíS & DONíTS OF RESTORING RELATIONSHIPS
Genesis 45:1-15
August 4, 2002

INTRODUCTION:

If you think your family has problems, consider the marriage mayhem created when 76-year-old Bill Baker of London recently wed Edna Harvey. She happened to be his granddaughterís husbandís mother. Thatís where the confusion began, according to Bakerís granddaughter, Lynn. She said, ďMy mother-in-law is now my step-grandmother. My grandfather is now my step-father-in-law. My mom is my sister-in-law and by brother is my nephew. But even crazier is that Iím now married to my uncle and my own children are my cousins.Ē From this experience, Lynn should gain profound insight into the theory of relativity. (Campus Life, March, 1981, p. 31)
Unfortunately most stories of messed up relationships arenít so funny. It is no laughing matter that half of all marriages in the church are ending in divorce. However, this message is not just about marriage relationships, but all relationships. We are going to take a look into an episode in the life of Joseph in order to learn the doís and doníts of restoring relationships. Learning and applying relational skills is vitally important because God made us to live in relationship with others. When Adam was alone in the garden God saw that it was not good for him to be alone. We can only live in relationships. We need each other.
A rather crude and cruel experiment was carried out by Emperor Frederick, who ruled the Roman Empire in the thirteenth century. He wanted to know what manís original language was: Hebrew, Greek, or Latin? He decided to isolate a few infants from the sound of the human voice. He reasoned that they would eventually speak the natural tongue of man. Wet nurses who were sworn to absolute silence were obtained, and though it was difficult for them, they abided by the rule. The infants never heard a word -- not a sound from a human voice. Within several months they were all dead. (Joe E. Trull)
Studies have also shown that single men are jailed more often, earn less, have more illnesses and die at a younger age than married men. Married men with cancer live 20% longer than single men with the same cancer. Women, who often have more close friendships than men, survive longer with the same cancers. Married or not, relationships keep us alive. (Dr. Bernie Siegel, Homemade, May, 1989)
Clearly healthy relationships are vital to our very lives. So letís look together at an encounter between Joseph and his brothers so we can learn the biblical principals for restoring relationships. Please follow along in your Bibles as I read Genesis 45:1-15 . . .

1. DONíT MAKE A PUBLIC SPECTACLE OF THE OTHER PERSON. (v. 1)

Years before Josephís jealous brothers sold him into slavery in order to get rid of him. He lived as a slave in Egypt for years and was then thrown in prison on trumped up charges. After years of life in prison he was set free because he was able, with Godís
Thanks mate - pulled a couple of pointers from this one