upon Jesus as her "Lord". Even then she will suffer, but this suffering will be of a different nature. She will then know that however terrible his agony is, it is glorious because of its purpose. She will then begin to concentrate on its redemptive meaning. Maryís merely emotional suffering must be replaced by something higher, that is, by adoration. This was the way that Jesus ministered love unto the broken hearted. It shows that in the Cross all barriers have been broken. Mary represents the women of the world, all too often treated as inferior. She represents those getting on in years. But at the Cross thereís no age barrier, no sex barrier, for all who come to Jesus are part of his household.

This Third Word from the Cross also reveals the relationship of Jesus with his disciple John, the one who had been closest to him. It didnít require a long explanation for John to know what was meant. We read that from that hour John took Mary into his own home. The question might be raised, "But why was not Mary committed into the care of one of her other children?" The answer is probably because they as yet hadnít received him by a living faith. John was ready and acted without hesitation. It has been said that this Word from the Cross is the least theological, but practical application of the gospel must never be separated from its message. It is only as theory is translated into practice that relationship with Christ becomes a living reality. This Word tells us that thereís love for you in the cross, and itís a love which having been received, is to be shared with others.

"My God, my God, why have you forsaken me" (Matt. 27:46).
There is a depth of feeling in this cry from the heart, made with an intensity matched only by the darkness which had draped itself over the terrible spectacle. Itís surely symbolic that the sun couldnít shine upon such a scene as the crucifixion of its Creator. The darkness lasted three hours and was an outward sign of the darkness that now wrapped itself around the soul of Jesus. Wave after wave of evil swept over his consciousness. All the sin of the world, the awful legacy of the fall of mankind was laid upon Jesus. "He who knew no sin was made to be sin for us that we might be made the righteousness of God in Him" (2 Cor 5:21).

Only the night before, Jesus had told his disciples that in his hour of trial they would all desert him but he said, "Yet I am not alone, for my Father is with me" (John 16:33). But now at the climax of his passion, at the moment of making atonement for our sin it was necessary that even his Father should stand aside. Just as a scapegoat of the Old Testament had to be banished into the wilderness, so Jesus had to bear the sin of the world alone - literally. God forsaken. He who was made sin for us was feeling the punishment of the sinner, being separated from God. His humiliation was complete. It has been said that "Christís self-emptying was
== I think we all forget in the rush of preparing our sermons to identify all our sources. Later we decide to submit them and the ideal is not fulfilled. When I have quoted Barclay I have not quoted him because although he is brilliant sometimes at others I don't agree with his thinking about miracles so choose to use but not confuse. But I am indebted to his work. blessings John
Manuel Parcon
February 19, 2015
Great sermon...except you did not quote William Barclay when you discussed about Paradise. It was verbatim...I just hope you mentioned your resources if you're going to quote them word for word. God bless.
Robert Mcmurdock
April 2, 2015
Are you sure it was an incomplete quote from William Barclay. We do have to remember that nothing is really original and perhaps the statement you say comes from William Barclay was for the moment mistakenly written without tribute to the author. Maybe it would have been better to have just dropped the matter and kept the tribute to a fine sermon. Blessings