Sermon:
Three different attitudes from the Parable of The Good Samaritan
Introduction
Not only our truthful speech, our attitude also matters for a sound Christian life. As we know, people have different attitudes.
Some want to receive from others, others want to live for themselves, while some live for others, the list may keep going.
However, let us meditate on only three attitudes from the scriptures to examine our attitude.
Please turn with me to the gospel according to Luke, chapter 10, and verses beginning from 31 to 37. Here we read about the parable of the Good Samaritan. Most of us might have read and preached from this passage.
In addition, we might have also heard of many interesting interpretations of this passage. I have even heard a preacher preaching, “Jerusalem is the Holy place, if you travel towards Jericho, the sinful city, you will fall into the hands of robbers.” I think some of us may believe in this interpretation.
Today, I want you look at the same passage in a different way. Probably we can name the first category as “Yours is Mine”.
A. Yours is mine
The first category people go with the robber’s attitude. Here, I don’t literally mean of stealing something from others but I want us to look at a broader meaning.
Judas had this attitude, his theory was, “I need to have a balance in my purse, for that I don’t mind betraying Jesus.”
Others’ attitude can be, “I need to excel, so I don’t mind taking other people’s resources for my benefit.”
In addition, some people use others’ weaknesses for their own glory. People today want a lot for themselves.
The Husband wants to exploit his father-in-law as much as possible. Children want to exploit their parents.
What the bible says about our attitude is that it is better to give than receive. Let God help us not to take the things which belong to others.
B. Mine is mine
Probably, we can say, the Priest and the Levite belong to this category.
Here, the principle is, “I must make use of all the opportunities in front of me without bothering about others.” I will not share anything, at the same time, I do not like to receive from others.” This is a lonely selfish group.
When someone is sick, this “Mine is mine” category is tempted not to visit, saying that it may not be good to disturb the sick person.
When someone is in financial need, they may say that God has allowed this situation, let us pray for him.
When someone is in need of academic help, they may say, let him suffer, so that he will learn through his mistakes.
When someone does a mistake, they may say it is not my job to correct him and they remain silent to maintain the relationship.
I believe that most of us fall under this category. We have come from different backgrounds, so sometimes in the name of “gentleness,” we miss out on serving others and commit the sin of omission.
C. Mine is yours
The Good Samaritan had this attitude.
When we say, Mine is yours, it does not mean that we have to give