Sermon:
Walking That Extra Mile: A Slightly Different Twist on Matthew 5:38-48

Note: If you are interested in more information about interpreting the Sermon on the Mount, please consider my book, "The Midrash Key" (by Ed Vasicek) available through Amazon.com

Here is a LENGTHY introduction for the Bible student. Sermon outline follows it:

I can honestly say that I have been "working" on the above verses for approximately 25 years in the back of my mind. Even while a student at Moody Bible Institute, I kept my eyes open to comments or insights that could help me understand these verses.

The problem with the above verses (if understood apart from the context I will mention below) is simple: they fly in the face of BOTH Old Testament teaching, the latter teachings of Christ, and the Epistles. I am not going to elaborate about these differences here, but Lewis Sperry Chafer does a thorough job of this in his book titled, Grace, The Glorious Theme. Although I do not agree with Chaferís solution to the conflict between the Sermon on the Mount and the latter teachings of Christ and the Apostles, he at least acknowledges the reality of the conflict.

Of course I believe the conflict disappears when we do what good interpretters are SUPPOSED to do, namely answer these two questions: (1) How did the speaker/writer understand his own words? and (2) How would the original audience have understood these words?

In light of this, I would like to go into the text with these pre-existing convictions:

What Christ taught did NOT contradict the Law nor the Epistles.

The Law is not some evil entity for childish disciples but is truly the Word of God and, though incomplete, is as pure as the One Who gave it.

Christ did not come to destroy, put down, or devastate the Law, but to fulfill it (properly interpret it).

The Law of Moses was not given to mankind, but to Israel; the Covenant of Noah WAS given for all mankind.

When Christ quotes the OT passage upon which He is commenting, fine; but when He doesnít, it might help to infer the passage and go from there. Since we have perhaps 10% of all that Christ said in this sermon, and since the Sermon on the Mount is a commentary and application of the Law, deducing the texts in question can prove invaluable, though risky.
I have pasted below a bulletin insert I wrote which offers additional thoughts to contemplate:

Jewish Insights Upon the Sermon on the Mount

As I mentioned before, our version of the "Sermon on the Mount" consists of sermon highlights; the actual sermon itself probably lasted two hours. We have perhaps only a dozen "highlight" minutes from which to reconstruct its meaning.

Since Christianity eventually abandoned its Jewish roots, and since gentile believers eventually outnumbered (and later suppressed) Jewish believers, the key to interpreting this sermon was lost. It is only when we remember that the speaker and audience were Jews and that Christ was addressing the hot issues