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What It Takes To Make A Difference

(95)

Sermon shared by John Slythe

May 2002
Summary: What does it take to make such an impact on our society that God’s Word penetrates even the darkest corners of the region? Maybe one of the smallest book in the Bible has the answer.
Denomination: Christian Church
Audience: Believer adults
Sermon:
What it Takes to Change The World:


The Book of Philemon is very interesting. Its probably a book we hear quoted the least out of all the books of the Bible and probably one that we look at the least. The book is a letter of Paul. But instead of a letter to a church, it’s a letter to a person – Philemon – thus the title of the book.

The book probably doesn’t turn heads because of the subject matter. It’s about a slave. Actually, its about a runaway slave named Onesimus who had stolend something from his master, Philemon and ran away to avoid being caught. Paul, in this short letter, is telling Philemon that Onesimus, the slave, has been saved under his ministry, and now he is sending him back to Philemon to see if Philemon will release forgiveness and freedom to Onesimus despite what wrong he had done.

So with the brevity of the book and the subject matter, we can see that obviously this book has little value to the kingdom right? No. In fact, in this book we find a unique picture of the entire Gospel. As our brother gave us a message on Thursday about the gospel in the book of Ester, we see in Philemon an illustration of the grace and mercy of God in the Good news of the gospel. Further proof that all the Bible points to one event in human history, the life, death, burial and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ. For in Philemon we see the Gospel portrayed in a relevant manner.

MAIN THEME - - - I see in this story a type of Christ in Paul, us in Onesimus, and the reconciliation of Onisemus to Philemon as a type of salvation.

Onesimus is the central figure. He’s the runaway slave.

Onesimus: a runaway thief (like so many of us and so many in the Bible – take for instance: Adam and Eve “I was ashamed and so I hid.” (they had just become slaves to sin). Or how about Elijah – “I am the only one left and so I ran.” (became a slave to fear.) Or how about Jonah. “I knew the people would repent and you would have mercy on them so I ran.” (Became a slave to jealousy). Also, Peter, In the time of Christ’s death he ran away from his identity. “I do not know the man.” Onesimus found himself in good company with many of the Bible’s key figures. The only problem – his story is very short. He stole something from the master/committed a sin against the master and ran away.

WE are the Onesimuses. We all are runaways. We may have a nice home, great children, or a high paying job, but in the final analysis unless we have bowed the knee to Christ, we are only runaway slaves. Slaves to sin.
Onesimus’s name means, “profitable.” But through sin, he became the opposite. Through sin he was worthless, a robbing slave. Who could trust him? Who would take him in? Who would give him a second chance for this “un profitable” thief.


Then there’s Paul: the servant of the Gospel, the bearer of good news and the image of Christ to Onesimus. He leads Onesimus to the knowledge of Christ and uses him for the benefit
Comments and Shared Ideas
Jim Ressegieu
September 6, 2013
Check the text please--there is nothing in the 25 verses that tell us Onesimus stole anything or that he ran away! Do we know WHY he was with Paul?

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