speak to you today, she would tell you that there is nothing more important than having a personal relationship with the Savior.
Do you know that? Is that your firm conviction today? Can you say with confidence, I KNOW that my Redeemer lives*? In historical fulfillment of Job*s words, centuries later Peter said, (1 Peter 1:18-19), knowing that you were not redeemed with corruptible things, like silver or gold, from your aimless conduct received by tradition from your fathers, (19) but with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot. Jesus is the redeemer that Job spoke of. Christ is our Redeemer, who has repurchased us. He has delivered us from bondage of sin by paying the ransom with His own sinless blood. The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Job went on to say, I know that my redeemer lives.
Jesus was living in the days of Job and he is still living today.
The heart of the Christian faith is our believe in not only do we accept God, we confess and believe in our hearts that God sent his only begotten son, we also rejoice on the fact, that Jesus promised that he would one day return. For the believer it gives us a glimps of hope, that there is something to expect when the enevitable come. The inevitable is when time is no more, comes to some as a surprise, to others its not a surprise, but it comes. Death is a reminder of the realities of God. Death is not a period but a comma in the story of life.

One thing certain about life is that we must leave it. The valley of the shadow of death is the longest valley in the world. It began with Adam and has continued through six thousand years of human history. Men like to postpone that dreadful moment when they must pass through the dark valley, but death underscores each life and refuses to accept the person of any man. Death does not take into account whether we have been profitable or detrimental to society. Every step that we take brings us nearer to the grave, and it is but a matter of time until we must bid farewell to every earthly tie. With all of the wisdom of the medical profession and the use of scientific discoveries, we must agree with the wise preacher of old who said; For the living know that they shall die (Ecclesiastes 9:5).

While our faith is not to be based upon our feelings, neither should it be divorced from our emotions.
It is said that when Socrates, the renowned Greek Philosopher, drank the poison hemlock and lay down to die, he was asked by his friends, Shall we live again? The reply of the dying philosopher was, I hope so, but no man can know.

In Job 14:14, Job asked the same question, Shall we live again; and the answer he gave, was much different than the answer Socrates gave. Socrates hoped that he would live again. Job said that he knew he would live again. Socrates faced death with anxiety. Job faced death with assurance. Socrates was uncertain that he would