Sermon:
Gene A. Smith, an American historian, authored a book entitled, “When The Cheering Stopped.” The book told of Woodrow Wilson, and the events surrounding WW1. Upon the end of the war, people were optimistic. They believed that the last war had been fought. The dream was that the world had at last been made safe, and the way had been paved for democracy and freedom everywhere.

When Woodrow Wilson paid his first visit to Europe, he was greeted by large crowds, and he was cheered every place he went. In many people’s eyes he was more popular than the greatest war heroes throughout the land. He was viewed as an icon of hope.

In all, the cheering lasted for about a year. Then it began to stop. The political leaders throughout Europe were interested more in their own agendas than a lasting peace, and the people slowly lost hope. On the home front, Wilson met opposition in the Senate, and his league of nations was never ratified. Under tremendous stress, his health began to fail. In the next election, his party lost. Woodrow Wilson, who almost two years earlier was heralded as a hero, came to his last days as a broken and defeated man.

History is filled with examples of people who started out humbly, rose to great popularity, and came to the end of their life in utter humiliation.

In our text today, we see such an example. Jesus, the son of a carpenter, educated in Nazareth, one who gained favor with men, one who was cheered and praised, would soon be mocked, scorned, and cast aside by the same ones who did the cheering.

On that Palm Sunday as Jesus approached Jerusalem, there were several things that He was aware of. He knew the conditions surrounding the people, and He knew the condition of the people’s heart.

The Jews found themselves under heavy Roman oppression. There were heavy taxes, restrictions, numerous executions by means of crucifixion, and Jesus knew all about those things. But He knew their heart.

The Jews were in search of someone. They desired a king, a conqueror, someone to set them free. They had seen the mighty works of this man Jesus. They were witness to Him restoring sight to the blind. They saw the evidence of Him healing the lame. They saw Him feed the multitude with a little boy’s lunch, and had leftovers to spare. They heard about Him raising Lazarus from the dead. They listened to Him teach with authority. Surely, with power and authority like that, Jesus was without a doubt the one who would set them free. So, Jesus came to Jerusalem, and the crowds began to cheer.

The timing was right. It was approaching the Passover feast. That was symbolic of the event where the death angel passed over Egypt, and Pharaoh let God’s children go. And now, just maybe now, Jesus would somehow lead them from the restraints and cruel treatment they received from the Roman government.

Jesus knew their heart. He knew their desires.

The Roman soldiers knew something as well. These soldiers knew
Wonderful word and valid points that takes us into the mind of Christ as His earthly ministry was coming to a close. Thanks for the inspiration it brought me on these verses!
Wonderful word and valid points that takes us into the mind of Christ as His earthly ministry was coming to a close. Thanks for the inspiration it brought me on these verses!
Awesome message with valuable points. thank you Pastor.
Dale Arnett
March 19, 2013
Loved this message, it stirred my spirit. I hope that I have permission to excerpt from this in this coming Sundays message.
Dante Pollescas
April 2, 2012
Thank you!! It stirred my innermost being...very timely in this chaotic world we lived in..Praise God for your insights Pastor! The Lord will bless you more and use you mightily in His service..
John Kiddy
April 1, 2012
An incredible word! I used this text today and this was possibly the most powerful messages I have ever preached! God bless.
Carol Patterson of Rev
April 2, 2009
How timely and well stated!! Thank you
Dan Chromy
March 18, 2008
I used this sermon in a pinch as a result of an anticipated pulpit supply opportunity. I just love the statement: "...they missed the fact that they walked in the presence of the Prince of Peace" - priceless! Also, a great historical perspective in the introduction.