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Winning With People: Do For Others What They Cannot Do For Themselves

based on 73 ratings
Aug 10, 2006
Denomination: Wesleyan
Audience: Adults

Summary: Too often, we don’t do more for others because we just don’t believe it will make much difference. We’re just adding a “drop in the bucket” we say. Joseph may have had no idea how much he was changing history—but I’m glad he chose to risk and offer what

“Do for Others What They Cannot Do for Themselves”

GENESIS 41

Joseph and Pharaoh

Joseph was an inmate, until Pharaoh needed what he had to offer. Joseph moved from

prisoner to prime minister in Egypt because he did for Pharaoh what the leader could not

do for himself. His gift made him indispensable.

What’s interesting to me is that we all have gifts to offer others. God has placed inside of

us strengths we are to use to benefit others. Everyone has something we all need. So, here

is the $50,000 question:

Why Don’t We Do for Others What They Cannot Do for Themselves?

FEAR AND INTIMIDATION: We’re afraid we won’t measure up.

Joseph was not intimidated to use his God-given gifts in the palace.

Frequently we don’t step out because we’re afraid of failure. What if we can’t do it? The

fear that we won’t measure up to perfection has kept many gifted people idle when they

should have acted. Joseph overcame this fear by believing the value he added if he was

right far outweighed the price he’d pay if he was wrong.. His life was on the line—but he

ventured out to offer wisdom to a Pharaoh who desperately needed it.

PRIDE AND EGO: We’re too self-centered with our resources.

Joseph was able to maintain perspective by crediting God with his ability.

Often, we are afraid of giving away “too much.” After all—it’s our intellectual property!

Joseph overcame this obstacle by declaring he didn’t have the ability to interpret the

Pharaoh’s dream—but God did. He was well aware that his “gift” really wasn’t his at all.

He was stewarding a gift from God, and it was to be used to advance His fame.

GREEDY WITH OUR TIME: We keep score on how much we give.

Joseph offered a relevant service without asking for payment or recognition.

Too many of us give to others—but with strings attached. We keep score along the way,

and stop giving the moment we feel we’re being used. We’re busy people. Too busy to be

too generous. This attitude limits our value because our focus is on what we’re giving up

not what they’re gaining. Joseph gave his gift away without a thought of asking for

payment. In return, he was surprised by being named prime minister of Egypt.

SCARCITY MINDSET: We stop at doing the bare minimum for others.

Joseph not only diagnosed the problem but he prescribed a solution as well.

Sometimes when we give what others need—we stop at doing only what they’ve asked.

We dare not be extravagant. Joseph shocked everyone when he not only gave a supernatural

interpretation of the dream, but a solution on how to handle the situation.

LACK OF VISION: We don’t see how our action could make any difference.

Joseph saw God’s hand in Pharaoh’s dream and in the significance of his response.

Too often, we don’t do more for others because we just don’t believe it will make much

difference. We’re just adding a “drop in the bucket” we say. Joseph may have had no idea

how much he was changing history—but I’m glad he chose to risk and offer what he had.

25 Ways to Win With People

How to Make Others Feel Like a Million Bucks

By John C. Maxwell and Les Parrott III

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