Sermon:
"Wrestling With God"
Genesis 32.27

Of all the mysteries I would like solved before I die, it is the one that says you must struggle if you are going to grow. Growth always means struggle in one form or another. I struggled when I was a youth, trying to grow physically. We all struggled as children attempting to grow emotionally, psychologically and intellectually. We struggle when we grow.

In Genesis 32 we find a man named Jacob who faced a lot of struggles as he grew to be the man God wanted him to be. Jacob left town in great disgrace -- Iím certain it had to be that he slinked out of town at night. It is also certain that aside from his mother, no one knew where he was headed. Jacobís brother Esau was so mad at him that Jacob had to leave town in a hurry -- just to survive.

Jacob struggled all through his life. God wanted him to be Godís man; Jacob fought it with that old nature that says, "Forget what God wants...be your own man! Do what you want to do; Hey, itís your life isnít it?" Each of us faces that tension today. There are struggles with relationships, morality, the physical realm.

We struggle in every area of life. We struggle with why some things must be. Why does a plane crash, or a bridge collapse in Korea? Why do children die?

Even though we accept struggle as a part of life, we still question its value, its purpose. Along with our questioning, there is one immutable fact that, if accepted, will give your suffering -- your struggling some meaning...

In lifeís crucible, God is there!
And He will help you through it all!

Note three PRINCIPLES about wrestling with God in the struggles of life. These principles are seen in the life of Jacob. He is camped at the river Jabok on the night before he is to confront his brother Esau. Jacob is coming home. He doesnít know what to expect. Itís been twenty years. This is a time when Jacob could really use a friend to help him.
Principle #1 --
Get alone with God

"And Jacob said, O God..." Ge 32.9a

Note that Jacob prayed, but he didnít get an answer right away. Jacob had grown accustomed to following God by this time. He was committed to going back -- to doing the right thing. This prayer was public. But Jacob got no answer until he got alone with the Lord.

Many of us depend too much on the prayers of others, such as the preacher, friend or spouse. God often wants to do something personal in us, and we, like Shakespeareís weak-kneed would-be lover, want someone else to plead our case. When youíre going to wrestle with the problems of your life it is important to get alone with God. Note verse 24: "And Jacob was left alone; and there wrestled a man with him until the breaking of the day."

When we get alone God is able to speak in that still small voice, asking us the hard questions: "What is thy name?" (Ge 32.27b). To Jacob that question meant more than simply what people called him. It meant he had to answer