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Mother Teresa was a 18-year-old Yugoslavian girl named Agnes Bojaxhiu (boy-AX-ee-oo) when she left home to become a nun. Over the next 20 years, she taught middle-class high school students, and was often described by her colleagues as “average.”


She felt God calling her in 1946 to serve India’s poor. She started with nothing — no shelter or finances. She picked up a woman dying in the gutter who been partially eaten by rats and ants and brought her to the hospital, badgering the reluctant doctors until they finally treated the woman.


Since then, hundreds of thousands have been rescued, and facilities for orphans, lepers, and AIDS patients have been created worldwide. She received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979, and since then had become a household name and the living image of Christian servanthood.


Mother Teresa was not a rising star in the church hierarchy; she had no inclination toward a power position in the Vatican. Unlike Paul, she was just a humble, average nun whom God chose to have a miraculous impact on the world.


She was humble even in death. Many people don’t recall when she died, since there wasn’t a lot of media coverage about it. You’d think the death of someone like Mother Teresa would have been the lead news story and generated countless TV specials about her life.


As someone who has worked with the media for more than 20 years, I can tell you that’s what would have normally happened. Normally. However, God called Mother Teresa home on a very abnormal news day. She died Sept. 5, 1997.


Her death was reported the following day, on Sept. 6, the day of Princess Diana’s funeral. Television, radio, magazines and newspapers were saturated with continuous coverage of Diana Spencer’s life, with hardly a word about Mother Teresa able to break through to the surface. Even in death, she was able to avoid the spotlight.