We've released a new version of SermonCentral! Read the release notes here.
Text Illustrations
ONE GIANT LEAP FOR MANKIND


ONE OF THE GREAT EVENTS OF THE 20TH CENTURY took place on July 20th, 1969, at exactly 4:17 P.M., EDT, when the Lunar Module "Eagle" landed on the surface of the moon. The Apollo 11 mission was the first manned mission to land on the moon. It was the 5th human spaceflight of Project Apollo and the 3rd human voyage to the moon.


The mission fulfilled President John F. Kennedy’s goal of reaching the moon by the end of the 1960s, which he expressed during a speech given before a joint session of Congress on May 25, 1961: "I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth."


That goal was realized when at precisely 10:56 P.M., astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the surface of the moon. He was followed shortly by Buzz Aldrin. This was purported to be the most amazing achievement ever by mankind. And of course, Armstrong spoke his famous line "That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."


But let me tell you of another leap that was even more amazing. God walked on the earth. He visited this planet to bring deliverance and hope. He didn’t have to take a space ship. At precisely the right time, according to the Father’s timetable, the earth-walk was achieved. Remarkable as it was, Armstrong’s moon venture pales in comparison to what is absolutely the most amazing event ever—the incarnation—God taking on human form. That’s what we celebrate every December. And among His many astounding words were those that echo throughout time and eternity: "I have come to give you life, and that more abundantly." (John 10:10)

Related Text Illustrations

Related Sermons