We've released a new version of SermonCentral! Read the release notes here.
Text Illustrations
FALLEN HUMAN NATURE


The fate of the women from Judges 19 touches the most troubling question of our modern time. Nobel Prize winner Elie Wiesel describe the most traumatic memory of his life, a scene from the year 1945, when he and his family were sent to the concentration camp by the German military machine:


'As the sea of people drifts by I see for the last time a mother and her little daughter, ghostly silent and introverted,' wrote Wiesel. 'I see them walk away, hand in hand, closely entwined. I will continue seeing them in my mind's eye as long as I live, how they disappear.'



The mother was his mother, too, and the daughter was his little sister, disappearing from view and forever lost to him in the extermination camp at Auschwitz. He, too, had experienced at first hand God's inaction in the face of injustice and His apparent indifference to human suffering.


'The Eternal, Lord of the Universe, the All-Powerful, was silent' he protested in his book, The Night. He expressed the feelings of countless defenseless victims who pleaded for a hand to intervene and deliver them from the evil they did not have the means to escape.


To find the story from Judges 19 in a book that is supposed to tell about God, suggests that the Bible presents the evidence fairly and in an unbiased manner. During a long, chilly night in the hills of Judaea, a young woman was deserted by her husband and sexually abused to death by people who had been chosen from among the nations of the world to safeguard a knowledge of God. It’s a story of our fallen human nature, a story revealing what people who chased away the presence of the Holy Spirit, can become. Beasts…

Related Text Illustrations

Related Sermons

Browse All Media

Related Media