Text Illustrations
In the autobiography of George Carey, the former Archbishop of Canterbury. Soon after he became a Christian he was called up to do his National Service in the Royal Air Force. He writes that the first test of his Christian discipleship was to follow the advice of his vicar which he found quite daunting: “George,” he said, “you must disclose that you are a Christian right from the start. Don’t be ashamed of your faith. When the lights go out, kneel by your bed and say your prayers.” He goes on to write that: “This seemed easy enough to agree to when in church, but I confess that as I surveyed the crowded billet on my first evening, with the good-natured banter of high-spirited young men all around me, my resolved wavered. Nevertheless, taking a deep breath, I knelt and spent several minutes in prayer.”


This unspoken testimony, certainly not lacking in courage, was noticed by his fellow recruits, and was helpful to several other of the young men who next day also declared themselves to be practicing Christians.