Text Illustrations
Officials from India were concerned about the aboriginal tribes which inhabited the islands off the coast of Myanmar after the Tsunami disaster. They feared that as many as 6,000 of these primitive people may have been killed — perhaps even wiping out some of the smaller tribes. So they sent helicopters to look for them, and deliver food and supplies. But the helicopters were met by a hail of arrows and thrown rocks from these fiercely independent people. The reason they survived is that they live mainly in caves up in the hills, even though they rely on fishing for their living. According to an AP news story carried by CNN and others, the Mokkien held to a belief handed down by the elders that “if the water recedes fast it will reappear in the same quantity in which it disappeared.” By the time the first great wave of the tsunami arrived, “the entire population of the Mokkien fishing village had fled to a temple in the mountains of South Surin Island,” Hataway said. The article concludes by saying, “It’s good to listen to one’s elders.”


The Scriptures are full of truth handed down by our elders, and these truths are important for our life and survival. As John said, “That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked at and our hands have touched — this we proclaim concerning the Word of life” (1 John 1:1). We say with Job: “I know that my Redeemer lives, and that in the end he will stand upon the earth” (Job 19:2). It is good to listen, to follow and to worship.



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