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A woman was telling me the other day how she used to want to be Joyce Meyer. She fantasized about how exhilarating it would be to minister to all those people.

But since she said she used to want to be Joyce, I had to ask:

“Why don’t you want to be Joyce anymore?”

It was because she analyzed the story behind the glory and realized:

1. Joyce has a gift that is supernatural and an anointing that is irreproducible.

2. Therefore, attempting to do what Joyce does without having the divine empowerment Joyce has would be like hobbling around with the king’s XXL armor when you really need a shepherd’s sling. Other people’s armor doesn’t protect you; it paralyzes you.

3. Anointing oil is produced through pressure. Joyce Meyer’s ministry of worldwide compassion flows largely from her own personal pain of childhood sexual abuse and the dysfunction that consumed the beginning of her adult life. To covet the oil but avoid the pressure is like mastering Guitar Hero, and signing your name "Jimi Hendrix" on all your correspondence. It’s called make believe, not Christ-like ambition.

4. Joyce Meyer’s life is full of blessing. It’s also full of immense burden. It’s chock full of rewards. It’s even heavier laden with responsibilities. To want the blessing without considering the burden is shortsighted at best, and self destructive, ultimately. A blessing can be a burden if you’re not destined and prepared to receive it.

It’s refreshing when you have a conversation with someone who used to want to be what she was never meant to be, but left that illusion behind to become a bona fide best version of herself the world has ever seen.

Pastor Steven Furtick is the lead pastor of Elevation Church. He and his wife, Holly, founded Elevation in 2006 with seven other families. The church has been listed by Outreach Magazine as one of the fastest growing and largest churches in America. 

Pastor Steven holds a Master of Divinity degree from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is also the New York Times Best Selling author of Crash the ChatterboxGreater, and Sun Stand Still.

Pastor Steven and Holly live in the Charlotte area with their two sons, Elijah and Graham, and daughter, Abbey.

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David Buffaloe

commented on Mar 27, 2012

I was told a long time ago, "Be who you are, because God made you and loves you. If He wanted you to be Adrian Rogers He would have made you Adrian Rogers". It took me a long time to understand those words. Thanks for reaffirming that.

Dahl Mcdermitt

commented on Mar 27, 2012

Thanks Steven, I was called aside just this Sunday evening by a deacon and told that in the past the pastors had been "quieter" when they preached and it may be better for me if I toned it down and was more like them in so many words. Not raise my voice. I admit I do get a little passionate at times. I tried preaching like my daddy when I started and he did get very loud. That was not me and then I tried to preach like my pastor softer and gentler that was not me. Finally I listened and God told me I was not either of them. Like David I am not Adrian either.

Drew Kizer

commented on Mar 27, 2012

"Supernatural" has to do with that which is beyond the natural world. I don't understand in what sense Joyce Meyer's ministry is supernatural. Barack Obama is a great speaker. How do we know that's not supernatural?

Dean Johnson

commented on Mar 27, 2012

I can identify with Dahl's story. My problem isn't that I wish I was someone else. It's that some others wish I was someone else!

Mark Baker

commented on Mar 27, 2012

Um ... am I missing something? I appreciate the main point of the article, but Joyce Meyer as your illustration? "Joyce has a gift that is supernatural and an anointing that is irreproducible." How about her theology? Does that matter more than some supposed "gift"? We have full control of our theology, but not over our "anointing." This is like using Benny Hinn. Why not use someone with at least semi-respectable theology?

Ron Hoffmann

commented on Mar 27, 2012

I have to agree with Mark Baker here. The example of Joyce Meyer is extremely problematic considering her extremely problematic theology! Of course, unless Furtick agrees with her theology. But hopefully the visitors to this website will have the discernment to see the issues here. The Jimi Hendrix analogy was useful though! Another problem I have beyond this is why do we assume leaders with large followings are "inspired." It doesn't follow reason. Otherwise, we'd have to change our theology to incorporate the views of Mormons, Muslims and Mediums! We need to THINK before we put our stuff out there, guys.

Gerald Graham

commented on Mar 27, 2012

Try having the last name of Graham. I only wish I had half the anointing Billy Graham had in His ministry but that's not what it's about. As one Pastor/mentor pointed out to me it's not all about "success" either. It's about obedience too (look at some of the prophets for example). And I assume you used Joyce Meyer because that was who was mentioned in your conversation with the woman you were speaking with. I wish we could focus on the lesson being presented which wasn't on Joyce Meyers theology...

Mark Baker

commented on Mar 27, 2012

Ron, I agree (and not just because you agreed with me). Popularity is not the positive sign that people think it is (Matt 7:13-14; Lk 16:15). Biblical truth is never truly popular, even among Christians.

Evan Jones

commented on Mar 27, 2012

When you, by using the measure of God's Word, conclude a person's Theology to be faulty, you have "Tested the spirits" and therefore you must also conclude their "supernatural gifts" and their "anointing" are faulty

Robert Cicman

commented on Mar 27, 2012

I happen to like Joyce Meyer. I've watched her for years and have read several of Her books , and have never heard anything out of the way in her theology. With that being said, maybe Im missing something. All in all lets give credit where credit is due. God has given Her a ministry that has helped thousands.

John Modgling

commented on Mar 27, 2012

Usually your articles are pretty good. Usually.

Mark Baker

commented on Mar 27, 2012

Robert, I'm a little surprised that you have no problems with her theology, but these differences happen a lot. Just google her name and word of faith or heresy and you will find plenty of info. Also, like someone else said, just because someone has large numbers does not mean it is of God. So I would not give her (or God) any "credit" for what she is spreading. By the way, I'm hoping that you capitalized "her" (twice) by mistake!!

Robert Cicman

commented on Mar 27, 2012

Mark, please excuse my grammer errors. Capitalizing "Her" was not intentional. I was only giving my personal experience with Joyce. I put very little stock in what I google. I do agree numbers can be deceiving. Could we be talking about disputable matters rather than the undisputable matters which Im sure we agree on. I would be very surprised if we didn't agree on the core issues of our faith, and MY experience with JMM is a fairly sound theology. Once again unless im missing something.

Robert Cicman

commented on Mar 27, 2012

O.K. spent a few minutes googling this and maybe there are some apparent problems. Such as Jesus being born again??? never heard of such a thing. Jesus completing our salvation in hell rather than a complete work on the cross, once again never heard that before from anyone. I spend a great deal of my time teaching the word of God and some times I must admit don't always thoroughly read between the lines. Surprisingly enough as much as I study Im in awe over these doctorins.

Robert Glass

commented on Mar 27, 2012

We should be ourselves instead of Joyce or anyone else. If we try to "Be like Mike" we will never be ourselves and the fraud will soon be found. Paul couldn't be Peter and Peter couldn't be John. We have to be ourselves or we are nobody.

Robert Sickler

commented on Mar 27, 2012

I am not sure Steven's admiration of Joyce is expressed very well ... it almost sounds like worship. Of course, if you were a fan of the prosperity gospel, and considered personal wealth as a mark of God's anointing, you might consider Joyce worth worshiping. By the same logic, you would consider all the Apostles to be losers.

Daniel Rivera

commented on Mar 27, 2012

For those who God gave a gift to preach, God gave them their own style to preach. As long as it lines up with the word of God, There's no problem. Giving their testimony is when they preach is good, It's the Devil that don't want preacher's to give their testimonies. Jealousy is a bad spirit, and God doesn't like gossiper's or debaiter's. Every preacher thhat are called to preach has their own way of preaching, otherwise why have many preacher's! If you have a problem the way someone preaches, then pray for them. But don't stomp on them. Some preacher's need to really pray hard. My personal opinion, Joyce Meyer's is a good preacher. And There aren't too many men who are called to preach are stepping up. But I give Joyce credit for stepping up. Lift one another up instead of putting them down. how would you like it if people didn't like your theology. Let God be the Judge. I'm sorry but you need to go before God and repent, for all i know you can be a false preacher, but it's up to God to judge you. Not all preacher's are perfect. I rebuke you Satan in the name of Jesus.

Julian Richards

commented on Mar 28, 2012

It seems to me that we are getting hung up on Joyce Meyer, which I don't believe is the point. The choice of example is clearly controversial, and may well have been a wrong choice, but the point to not try to emulate anyone - whoever that may be is a good one. We are uniquely suited to the role God has called us to - God chose me to be me, I serve Him by being the best me I can be!

Zachary Bartels

commented on Mar 28, 2012

Lemme save Pastor Elvis some words. You shouldn't preach like Joyce Meyers because she preaches the prosperity heresy.

Mark Baker

commented on Mar 28, 2012

Daniel, It is not a sin to address false teaching or teachers. In fact, it IS a SIN NOT to expose falsehoods in the church. Protecting the flock from wolves in sheep's clothing is a very godly, loving, and REQUIRED aspect of Christians! Furthermore, it is false teachers who are blamed for division in Scripture (Rom 16:17-18). Yet you are protecting and defending a false teacher and attacking anyone who warns others. Where is that in Scripture? Also, you are judging and condemning the motives of others (e.g. jealously) who point out false teaching--which is not only an inaccurate judgment, it is sinful. It is one thing to discern if something or someone is either biblical or errant (Acts 17:11), but to judge the heart and intent of those who you do not even know is clearly wrong. The church's problem is not a lack of unity or preaching, it is a lack of discernment, a lack of faithful preaching of the Word, and an abundance of false teachers--as is prophesized about the last days.

Doug Conley

commented on Mar 29, 2012

Unless it's to other women or children, a woman shouldn't be preaching at all...according to Scripture.

Michael Morton

commented on Mar 29, 2012

I used to read and participate in the United Methodist Church national forum. The discussions came to be so acrimonious that they finally shut the discussion board down. Over time I have observed that this site is going in the same direction. Sad.

Jeff Steen

commented on Mar 29, 2012

Wow! What a lovely, loving bunch. Thanks Steven. Amazed at the quickness to bash instead of just getting the point being made which is right on.

Gordon Dorsey

commented on Mar 29, 2012

SHALOM SAINTS VERY GOOD ARTICLE.! TO ALL PASTORS CREATE YOUR OWN STYLE THEY MAY HAVE SOME GOOD TIPS THAT WE CAN USE AND SHARE/ BUT IF THEY SEE JOYCE AND NOT YOU YOU WILL NOT KEEP THEM IN THE SEATS.YOUR FLOCK WILL ADOPT YOUR PERSONAL STYLE FOR TEACHING AND RESPECT YOU FOR THAT NOT BEING A COPY CAT OF SOMEONE ELSE. SHALOM SHALOM PASTOR DORSEY

Fernando Villegas

commented on Mar 29, 2012

Doug Conley, according to Scripture, is a woman allowed to prophesy to a man? This is a sincere question, and I hope to hear your response.

Chaplain Shawn Kennedy

commented on Mar 30, 2012

Doug you must be pro-slavery as well, according to the gospels.

Dennis Cocks

commented on Mar 30, 2012

Wow Shawn! Really? Didn't you read my answer to your comment on slavery in the last discussion we had on "revival"? 2 Timothy 2:11-3:11 is a clear command from God. Where are we commanded to put people in slavery in the Scriptures? The verses you used to "qualify" slavery are not commands but how to act if you find yourself a slave or how to treat a slave. Much like how Paul tells a woman who is married to an unbeliever in 1 Cor. 7:13-16 how to act in her situation. Does God condone marriage to an unbeliever? No! 2 Cor. 6:14-16. But Paul was saying if you find yourself in this situation, this is how you should act. Same thing Peter and Paul said about slavery. In our day we could apply this to employers and employees.

Dennis Cocks

commented on Mar 30, 2012

John E Miller in the "Revival" article makes a very good point Shawn. I hope he won't mind me quoting him to you here since this was meant for you in the previous article. Here is what he said "The introduction of the subject of slavery is a diversionary tactic to confuse the issue and demonstrates a lack of understanding of scripture. Nowhere in the New Testament is slavery recommended." I couldn't agree more. God says leadership is male no matter what century we are in.

Chaplain Shawn Kennedy

commented on Mar 30, 2012

Thank you Taliban Members! I'm sure John loves it when his favourite toady quotes him. You must also be a proponent of Deuteronomy 21:18-21.

Dennis Cocks

commented on Mar 30, 2012

All I can say Shawn, is, WOW!

John E Miller

commented on Mar 31, 2012

I have no objection to being quoted. Dennis Cocks is not my toady, in fact I have absolutely no knowledge of him apart from reading his posts on this forum. Chaplain Shawn Kennedy's intemperate remarks only further weaken his position in an attempt to disguise his woeful lack of understanding of God's word in this matter. As far as Mr Furtick's effusive praise of Joyce Meyer is concerned, he is absolutely right in one point. Mrs Meyer's life is truly "chock full of rewards". In Matthew 6, Jesus three times says of a certain type of person, "They have their reward." Note the present tense. His advice to His followers is to "lay up treasures in heaven...". Mr

John E Miller

commented on Mar 31, 2012

Cont'd/Mrs Meyer's wealth, huge income and extravagant life-style is well documented. In stark contrast the One she claims to serve had nowhere to lay His head. He carried no money, had to beg for a drink of water, owned no property, and was buried in a borrowed tomb. At the end of His earthly sojourn His entire possessions were a few items of peasant clothing.

John E Miller

commented on Mar 31, 2012

cont'd/ Mr Furtick may think that Joyce Meyer is worthy of tremendous adulation. Christ's evaluation of our life and service for Him here is yet to be revealed.

John E Miller

commented on Mar 31, 2012

The subject of ths "article2 is "Why you shouldn't preach like Joyce or play like Jimi". I have no knowledge of how "Jimi" (whoever Jimi is) plays nor do I have any ambition in that direction. Since Joyce does not preach "the Word of the Cross" I have no inclination to imitate her, nor do I covet her immense material wealth. That is why I WOULDN'T preach like Joyce and why I can't play like Jimi (whoever Jimi is).

Tony Moore

commented on Aug 21, 2012

"The one she claims to serve had nowhere to lay his head"? I'm so tired of hearing that silly argument used against Christians who aren't in poverty. The person making that argument probably sleeps on a pillow in a bed in their own home every night. Do you really want to argue that one pillow is ok but two would be too many? Or what is the pillow limit. Really? I thought we were serving the King of the universe. The earth is the Lord's and everything in it. How many pillows did God bless Abraham with? Or David? Or Solomon? Or Peter? Keep in mind that the same judgment you use, silly or not, will be used to judge you.

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