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Preachers have their own set of temptations! That fact can be illustrated by an event in the life of John Bunyan. Bunyan had preached an unusually anointed sermon. Immediately after the service, a layman jumped from his pew and raced to shake Bunyan’s hand exclaiming, “Bunyan, that was the most powerful sermon I have ever heard!” Bunyan replied with brutal honesty, “Man, you need not tell me that. The devil whispered it to me before I was well out of the pulpit.”

Preachers face the temptation to “enjoy the sound of their own voice,” to secretly revel in the compliments they hear and, as in the case of Bunyan, to give ear to our adversary’s commendations on our preaching.

How does this relate to our preaching on homosexuality? We are tempted to be grandiose, forceful and effusive when addressing homosexuality. Scottish preacher James Stuart Stewart wrote, “There is a type of preaching which apparently regards it as more important to generate heat than supply light.” It is easier to denounce homosexuality from the pulpit with great fervor and vast sweeping gestures than to portray a loving God who separates our sin from us as far as the east is from the west.

Theologian Albert Mohler writes regarding homosexuality, “Evangelical Christians must ask ourselves some very hard questions, but the hardest may be this: Why is it that we have been so ineffective in reaching persons trapped in this particular pattern of sin?”

His question is daunting and sobering. What are we preachers doing and saying that we should not do or say? Conversely, what are we not doing or saying that we should do or say?

In a Peanuts comic strip, Lucy tells Linus, “I finally figured out how to prove to everyone that my religion is right.” Linus asks, “How do you do that?”  “It’s simple,” says Lucy, “I hit 'em over the head with my lunch box!”

While I am unaware of any preachers who have resorted to that form of “evangelism,” I am aware of counterintuitive and counterproductive measures we have employed in our preaching on this issue.

This article is meant to identify, clarify and rectify those inappropriate measures and to recommend alternate measures that will bring homosexuals to Christ rather than inadvertently push them away.

You may ask, “Where must I go to gain an audience with the homosexual?” The truth is you are presently preaching to homosexuals; they are among your visitors and, yes, your members. Some constitute your choir, elders and deacons. They are men and women, married and single, teenagers and senior adults. Overwhelmingly, they are inconspicuous. But you should know they are there. 

Though some are “satisfied” with their homosexuality, the vast majority are not. This majority do not live a gay lifestyle. They do not march in gay parades or fight for social “rights.” They hurt! They hurt deeply! They want freedom from same-sex attractions, and they want to hear a word from you that goes beyond condemnation.

Before Addressing Homosexuality, Exegete Your Congregation

If you are unaware of anyone in your church dealing with homosexuality, you might ask yourself, “Why is that?” As you exegete your text, so must you exegete your congregation. “What besetting sins are they experiencing?” “Who appears to be in Bunyan’s ‘slough of despond’?”

During a former pastorate, I preached a sermon called “Tackling Sexual Temptation,” which I laced with specific biblical principles. A month later, during a personnel committee meeting, a committee member said, “That sermon was inappropriate for our congregation.” I responded that there were more requests for that sermon on tape than any other sermon I had preached at that church. 

What I could not recite to the committee was a list of members struggling with such carnal desires. I had counseled one gay man and two lesbians, a single man and a married man addicted to porn. Another single man frequented a prostitute weekly. I baptized a lady who used to dance topless and who eventually became the object of an older, established member’s flirting. It was an exciting pastorate!

While sermons on biblical human sexuality remain taboo, the sermon topic in many churches revolves around such burning issues as “Is Hell Humid?”

John Piper writes, “The human heart is a ceaseless factory of sensual desires.” He is correct—and so is Mohler when he writes, “The tragic fact is that every congregation is almost certain to include persons struggling with homosexual desire or even involved in homosexual acts.”

I cannot begin to tell of the number of parents who hear our heated remarks on homosexuality and suffer silently with a son or daughter who is caught in homosexuality’s trap. One such mother told me that hearing her pastor’s imprudent remarks felt like being jabbed in the stomach with a butcher knife. It would be very rare for a parent to disclose their pain to such a pastor.

When Addressing Homosexuality, Examine Your Motivations and Goals

Say you are speaking to a convention hall filled with homosexuals; they have not been corralled but have volunteered to attend. They earnestly desire to know what biblical counsel you may offer. Precisely what are you going to tell them?

Before you answer, examine your motivations and goals. What motivates you to address these persons? (They are persons before they are homosexuals!) What do you want to happen in the lives of these individuals? Remember, no one has ever been argued out of homosexuality or into the Kingdom of God.

Are you going to tell them they need to "convert" to heterosexuality? Are you going to recommend they date individuals of the opposite sex?

Many Christians peddle heterosexuality like it’s "another gospel." (See Galatians 1:6) Conversion is to Jesus Christ who, in turn, transforms us into His image. Jesus did not say “Go and make heterosexuals” but rather “Go and make disciples.” Remember—it is not a sin to NOT be attracted to the opposite sex; it IS a sin to be involved in any form of sexual activity apart from the husband/wife relationship. What’s more, mankind is already heterosexual—physiologically, anatomically and biologically.

To advise a lesbian to “date more, you have not met the right guy” misses the point entirely. Such advice is as effective as firing a machine gun at a tidal wave. Her greatest need is not to feel safe in the arms of a potential husband but to feel secure in the nail-scarred hands of her powerful and all-sufficient Savior and Lord.

Joe Dallas writes, “Often people ask, 'How do you witness to a gay?'  The question itself shows a certain misunderstanding. Why should witnessing to gays be any different than witnessing to anyone else? Their homosexuality is not our main concern. The state of their souls is.”

When Addressing Homosexuality, Expound the Whole Counsel of God

By this, I mean give your people “the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.”

Mohler writes, “Outside the walls of the church, homosexuals are waiting to see if the Christian church has anything more to say after we declare that homosexuality is a sin.”

If you do not know it yet, know it now that although this writer is ashamed of his past homosexuality, he is not ashamed of the gospel of Jesus Christ. I personally did not experience freedom from homosexuality by reading and re-reading the account of Sodom and Gomorrah, Leviticus 18 and 20, Romans 1 or 1 Corinthians 6—classic passages which condemn homosexuality. Yes, they impressed upon me that this form of sexual activity is sin, but I was already certain of that. Pounding those passages over and over in your preaching may provide a diagnosis, but they do not necessarily provide a prognosis or a plan of action.

Let me illustrate this with an e-mail I received from a Christian man who mistakenly thought I was still a homosexual.

"I will continue to pray for your misunderstanding and immoral offenses. I have faith that God will open a door for you so you can realize your sins. Here is a verse written by Paul in Corinthians. ‘Do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived. Neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor homosexuals, nor sodomites, nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners will inherit the kingdom of God.’

If Jesus was ok with homosexuality, then why were Paul and everyone else to follow the Christian movement until the late 20th century so against it? The Bible talks about such calamities as this in the end times. Please find the truth.”

Much love, Tom (not his real name)


While Tom is grossly mistaken in his belief that I am still a homosexual, and the tone of his e-mail is (how can I say it compassionately?) less than compassionate, those are not my main points. Tom’s chief blunder is that he does not give me the whole truth when he quotes 1 Corinthians. He quotes verses nine and ten, but omits verse eleven that is crucial to the text. Verse eleven reads, “And that is what some of you were. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus.” (Emphasis added)

Expounding the whole counsel of God does not necessarily mean you must devote an entire message to homosexuality. When Paul wrote 1 Corinthians, he listed homosexuality among other sins—idolatry, adultery, burglary, greediness, drunkenness, slanderers and cheaters.

Also, rather than addressing the issue annually, address it perennially—on a semi-regular basis. F.B. Meyer wrote that a good sermon should be like a good portrait. A good portrait has the person’s eyes making contact with every viewer regardless of where he stands. Thus, a good sermon makes contact with every listener regardless of where he sits. Include those with homosexual temptations in your preaching. 

When addressing homosexuality, preach on the healthy same-sex relationships revealed in Scripture—David and Jonathan, Paul and Timothy, and Jesus and John the Beloved Apostle, to name a few.

The Apostle Paul did not hide his affection for male companionship. Paul wrote, “Now when I went to Troas to preach the gospel of Christ and found that the Lord had opened a door for me, I still had no peace of mind, because I did not find my brother Titus there... .” (2 Cor. 2:12-13)

How do you approach expounding God’s Word when handling homosexuality? Preachers, we can be right on the sin of homosexuality and yet wrong on our approach! Vance Havner, the unschooled revival preacher said, “You can dot every I and cross every T and still misspell the word.”

Our Approach Demands Love, Respect, Care, Empathy, Humility and Kindness.

The first rule to evangelizing homosexuals is that you love them. One of W.E. Sangster’s seven rules for personal evangelism is “Do not set out to make people good—love them.” Mohler states, “We must love homosexuals more than they love their homosexuality.”

The Episcopal preacher Phillips Brooks wrote, “The next element of a preacher’s power is genuine respect for the people whom he preaches to.” If you speak of the homosexual with contempt, disgust and hatred, you will not win him to Christ.

Edward Welch writes, “When sharing the Bible’s truth to a homosexual, we must not exhibit any hint of self-righteousness.”

Warren Wiersbe writes, “Lost sinners came to Jesus not because He catered to them or compromised His message, but because He cared for them.”

First Peter 3:15 reads, “But in your hearts set apart Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect... .”

After Addressing Homosexuality, Expect Resistance

Expect resistance from outside as well as inside the church, from both sides of the theological spectrum—those who believe homosexuality is immoral and those who believe homosexuality is biblical.

To those who may resist from within your church, lovingly remind them of what was reportedly found in a late medieval manuscript: "The church is something like Noah's ark. If it weren't for the storm outside, you couldn't stand the smell inside."

Merville Vincent writes, “In God's view, I suspect we are all sexual deviants. I doubt if there is anyone who has not had a lustful thought that deviated from God's perfect idea of sexuality.”

I realize pastors may fear the repercussions of addressing homosexuality, but remind yourself that you are a herald of the gospel; you have been called to “preach the Word,” and as someone has said, “You have been bought with a price, and what you want to do with your life is irrelevant.” Phillips Brooks wrote, “If you are easily swayed by men’s opinions, do anything but preach.”

Some members would have you repeat that tired refrain, “God made Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve.” Refuse to do so! Such comments come across as antagonistic rather than as evangelistic.

Take courage from Joe Dallas, who writes, “Our response should show interest and concern, two qualities the church has rarely shown when dealing with homosexuality. We must admit we have mishandled the issue in many ways: we have veered between ignoring the problem to becoming obsessed with it, we have made hasty and false generalizations at times about homosexuals themselves, and we have shown a tremendous zeal for defeating the political goals of gays while showing less concern for their eternal well-being.”

You may feel resistance within yourself—“Do I really need to address homosexuality? To do so might upset the ecclesiastical apple cart and harm the church.” Preacher, take yourself seriously, but not too seriously. Hear these words that my Christian brother Gary Chapman told me years ago, “The best evidence that the Church is a divine institution is that she has survived her preachers.”

I wish I knew what makes Bob Stith tick. Who is Bob Stith and why am I concerned about the tick? Bob is longtime pastor of a Texas church outside Ft. Worth. A confessed former redneck, Bob realized years ago that his preaching on homosexuality would not attract homosexuals to Christ. In his own words, he recognized he was part of the problem and asked God to show him how to love homosexuals.  

God has blessed Bob. Bob is a board member of a local ministry that reaches out to homosexuals; he initiated a Task Force on Ministry to Homosexuals for a major denomination through which he and I serve. More importantly, Bob speaks to pastors everywhere—helping them gain new understanding in meeting this great need. I wish I could clone him.

Presbyterian preacher and Chaplain of the U.S. Senate years ago, Peter Marshall said, “There are aspects of the gospel that are puzzling and difficult to understand. But our problems are not centered around the things we don't understand but rather in the things we do understand. This, after all, is but an illustration of the fact that our problem is not so much that we don't know what we should do. We know perfectly well, but we don't want to do it.”

Joseph Sizoo writes in his book, Preaching Unashamed, “Jesus healed them all. He identified Himself with the paralytic who had just enough feeling to know pain. He became one with the lepers whose bodies withered with anguish. He seemed to belong to the blind who stumbled through the streets of eternal darkness. He cared what happened to the lily that faded, the reed that was bent, the coin that was lost, the prodigal son who had stepped across the threshold of indiscretion. He was the most compassionate man who ever lived.”



Tim Wilkins, a formerly practicing homosexual, is the founder/director of Cross Ministry, which is dedicated to equipping the Church to evangelize and disciple the homosexual. He has a Masters of Divinity from Southwestern Seminary. Wilkins is the creator of the 1-day conference– MORE THAN WORDS: walking (versus talking) people out of homosexuality, which has been conducted around the country and among many denominations. Here he addresses the topic of Handling Homosexuality in Your Preaching. You may contact him at office@crossministry.org.

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Talk about it...

Warren Whitaker

commented on May 17, 2012

I'm rarely the first to read an article and never been the first to leave a comment, which I actually rarely do. However the fact that no comments have been made speak volumes to the apprehension that surrounds this topic. This is a well written article that points to our need to deal with sexual sin and not simply preach against people who struggle with it. We don't generally preach against specific types of greed or anger. But the sin and the devastating effects of sin. Making a comment on homosexuality as a sexual sin and then preaching on the healing that Christ offers is just as important as preaching on the healing that Christ offers for adulterers, fornicators, and those struggling with pornography because they are equal sexually immoral sins.

Brad Brucker

commented on May 17, 2012

Amazing Article for such a time as this! Thanks Tim for your wisdom and compassion. My brother died in 1995 of AIDS. Before we reconciled in 1988, I hated my brother. I came to Christ in 1986 and he delivered me from Alcoholism (Yep, you and my brother are former practicing gays, I'm a former drunkard - I guess we're both in Paul's vice list! :-). While reading 1st John chapter 4 in 1988 the Holy Spirit nailed me on vs 20 "If we say we love God, but hate our brother, we are liars!" I know that verse is said to be more about hating fellow believers, but God let me know in no uncertain terms, my hate for my brother was a greater sin than my brother's homosexuality. After all, I really wasn't that concerned with my brother, I was more concerned with what people would think of me and my reputation if people knew I had a brother who was gay. Sometimes our distain and fear and hardened hearts cause us to be compassionless. Jesus wasn't. Anyway, again... thanks! God Bless you Tim Wilkens!

Julia Swilling

commented on May 17, 2012

This article has touched me at a time when my heart has been broken. I cannot begin to tell the entire story, but I simply ask for your continued prayers for those of us who have been entrusted with delivering the Gospel and living a life style indicative of what we preach. These times are truly"...trying the souls of men," but I choose to believe God's report. He is not a God that He should lie...what He says, He means.

Jeff Strite

commented on May 17, 2012

Deeply insightful article. I appreciate the wisdom and information this imparted. Thank you

J. Jones

commented on May 17, 2012

@Brad Brucker Thank you for your comment. <3<3

David Parks

commented on May 17, 2012

This is the best article I have ever read on the subject. Nothing I can say can add to it except, "Thanks."

David Parks

commented on May 17, 2012

To Brad. Thanks for your comments and openness. You bring up another important point that I need to add to my teaching on the subject.

Janice Roseboro

commented on May 17, 2012

I am a pastor who has been blessed to pastor several converts who were of the gay lifestyle. I was so blessed by your article. It moved me to weeping. Thank you for sharing. It is a very timely word from the Lord. God bless you.

Steven Brown

commented on May 17, 2012

This is a beautiful and compelling article that reaches the heart of the matter.

Arne Peterson

commented on May 17, 2012

Tim! Thank you for your outstanding, biblical, and well written article. Very timely and much appreciated. Blessings!

Richard Graf

commented on May 17, 2012

An excellent and very Christian article for those who regard homosexuality as sin, as well as for those of us who don't. Thank you.

Charles Wallis

commented on May 17, 2012

Thanks for this article - we just had a man in our church admit he is gay and wonder if he can stay in the church (we told him definitely yes which I am glad for). Truth is there is a lot of sexual struggle in the church and few talk about it - but it is very real. Men struggle and I am guessing many women have related struggles. It is a big issue in scripture - we need to deal with it. Thank you for pointing out that the goal is not sexual identity, but Christ identity first.

Richard Graf

commented on May 17, 2012

An excellent and very Christian article for those who regard homosexuality as sin, as well as for those of us who don't. Thank you.

Joel Rutherford

commented on May 17, 2012

Your Comments

Keith Jackson

commented on May 17, 2012

I just had a college student in my congregation come to me last night with a prayer request: "A friend of mine has just 'come out' and I'd like for you, pastor, to keep me in prayer as I attempt to minister to him." Though your article is addressed to preachers, I believe that it is a divinely and timely sent resource to help this young man minister to his friend. Thank you, Tim!

Joe Cotten Drisdale

commented on May 17, 2012

Thanks so much. I have never experienced an alternate lifestyle, but I definitely would have fallen in the desert?or worse?in Moses? day from things in my own past. It is sad that this issue sometimes goes out from the pulpit as if it were the one unforgivable sin.

Anthony R. Watson

commented on May 17, 2012

This was a well written article. As an African-American minister, this is a touchy topic in the Black church, as it is in other churches as well. It's even more difficult to address when the President of the United States recently embraced same-sex marriage (a huge mistake on his part). But the Gospel must be preached, in season and out of season (1 Timothy 4:2). "Even so, come, Lord Jesus" (Revelation 22:20).

Charles Falugo

commented on May 17, 2012

This article is the best article on this subject that I have ever read. It is full of helpful Biblical thoughts, ideas and suggestions. I have been blessed by Tim's thoughtful sensitivity and articulate explanations and advice. Thank you, Tim.

Zachary Bartels

commented on May 17, 2012

Charles Falugo says... "This article is the best article on this subject that I have ever read." You don't need to tell him that; the devil had whispered it to him before he had well hit send. J/K! Great article... Still has five stars after I voted...

Graham Milligan

commented on May 17, 2012

This is a great article, a very constructive resource. I just explored your website at Cross Ministry and found additional wonderful resources to help with this topic. Many thanks for your ministry!

Dr. Thomas Norton

commented on May 17, 2012

What a voice of grace and truth, Tim. Praise God for his touch upon your heart and life and may God use your voice to enable more of us "regular sinners" to continue to share the only gospel that sets sinners free.

William Harrison Tonihka

commented on May 18, 2012

Well written

Robert Sickler

commented on May 18, 2012

This is a good article but it could have been about drug abuse or being an alcoholic or being a sorcerer or ... I am not sure why we look at homosexuality as some kind of special sin that is worse than all the others.

Tom Martins

commented on May 18, 2012

A very sad article, and very misleading. I am not questioning the motives of the writer, but sadly, it goes against much of what we have learned about sexuality. Hopefully the writer doesn?t feel the same way about modern medicine and surgery. This attitude heaps more guilt on people who are simply a minority. Thankfully we have stopped discriminating against left-handed people. Hopefully the time will come when the same is true of gay men and women. I spent a wonderful evening recently with a gay friend who has finally been able to step out of a relationship and situation which he has, for years, felt he had to maintain, because of the cruel judgement of Christians who are terribly concerned with homosexuality, which Jesus never mentioned. But who are not nearly so concerned about Matthew 25, the sheep and the goats, and the idea that heaven and hell are dependent on how we love, not what we claim to believe. "Lord, Lord" is not going to cut it. Gay men and women are welcome at my church. And you don't have to pretend to be heterosexual to come along. Bring your gay partner if you would. You would be very welcome!

Karen Mcdowell

commented on Aug 9, 2014

Christians are andshould be concerned about every sin. You see it is not mans who condemns one's sin but rather it is the word of God. True Christians must continue to teach and preach the truth in love. We must love "All Sinners", but hate th"The SIN". There is a life beyond our earthly life, and the Bible is very clear. ..."No Sin cannot enter there"

Jeff Law

commented on Aug 10, 2014

The Law came about not from the Garden of Eden. It came after God revealed his power, his love, and his voice toward a nation. As a nation, those to whom he demonstrated these things, it desired him not, yet, it still demanded God to perform his the promises he gave to their fathers (who did love him in the absence of Law). That is the plight Jesus came into when he entered the scene ... to show men how to love God and how to love each other. - The Law spelled it out how to love God and each other. Jesus lived it. He not only lived the Law. He excelled it. One of Jesus' missions was fulfill the Law. That was his life here on Earth. - In reference to not loving one another nor God, the Law spoke negatively against sexual idolatry as an act of not showing love to God nor man; not just homosexual idolatry, but also heterosexual idolatry outside of marriage, and also sexual idolatry between species. - Jesus fulfilled the Law. He did not idolatarize sexual activity at all. He was celebant. - As Paul stated, the Law is good if it is used lawfully. - Ignorance is bliss as some have said. Sin is pleasurable as the Bible has also said. - Marriage between a man and a woman is most difficult of all relationships. It takes God to make it work lovingly. if a man does not love his wife as Christ loves the church. A successful marriage requires a man in love with God. - If being a disciple (a person who is in love with God) were easy, most would (as many do call themselves Christians) be able to easily do it. - Though Jesus did not mention homosexuality as far as defining it, the Law already had, so Jesus did not have to redefine it nor speak differently upon it.

Mike Spencer

commented on Aug 10, 2014

Tom, Not sure what you are referencing when you cite "much of what we have learned about sexuality" No, Jesus never mentions homosexuality, or bestiality, or sado-masochism. The argument from silence is almost always a weak argument, and it is weak in this case as well. However, Jesus did affirm the truth of all areas of scripture, law, prophets and readings. The fact is, Jesus did affirm that man and woman were created as complementary to one another, and the rest of scripture confirms this. Should homosexuals come to our meetings? Absolutely, as well as liars, thieves, adulterers and every kind of hypocrite. They should all be convinced through scripture of their sin, and they should all be told to repent of, and confess their sins and believe on the Lord Jesus Christ as the sole source of their salvation. What we learn in scripture about our sexuality is the same thing we learn about every other good thing that God designed for their respective and specific purposes: that we, through the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes and the pride of life twist and pervert it all. It is not love to lie about the reality of sin. Homosexuality, rather than a description of one's sexual essence is merely a description of a behavior. There is no other way to define this than the entirely subjective feelings of individuals who, like all of us, would love to be justified in our sin.

Ricky Dean Mauldin

commented on Jun 18, 2015

T hank you for the "but..." in your article. Did Jesus rail over homosexuality? No, but he validated the prophets who ID'd it as sin. So, this article was great in that it (1) confronted sin as sin, (2) the regenerative power of Christ, and (3) the church needs to recall we're all broken little mud men of clay feet. Ergo, we have to steady the standing, whatever Christ saved them out of (I know, preposition).

Leonidas Constable

commented on Aug 11, 2014

Being left handed was never a sin in the Bible. Wrong comparison, Sir.

Leonidas Constable

commented on Aug 11, 2014

Being left handed was never a sin in the Bible. Wrong comparison, Sir.

Luther Butler

commented on May 18, 2012

Where did Jesus tell his disciples to preach about homosexuals? I think Albert Mohler is addressing a subject he is not qualified to address unless he learned something at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary that I didn't. "For God so loved the world" doesn't exclude people because of their sexual orientation. I doubt if the Apostle Paul could have been a preacher in the SBC because being married is almost always a requirement.

Luther Butler

commented on May 18, 2012

Where did Jesus tell his disciples to preach about homosexuals? I think Albert Mohler is addressing a subject he is not qualified to address unless he learned something at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary that I didn't. "For God so loved the world" doesn't exclude people because of their sexual orientation. I doubt if the Apostle Paul could have been a preacher in the SBC because being married is almost always a requirement.

Theodore Payne

commented on May 18, 2012

Great article, very much on time for the season that we live in. I have had to address the same situation in the past, but for the future, this will help as a resource as well. Blessings to you.

Oladipo Ajayi

commented on May 19, 2012

Why is so much attention paid only to homosexuals among all the sins that easily beset us? How about the decayed marriage institution where men and women are changing spouses like underwears, including pastors? What's the #1 cause of marriage break-up? Adultery of course. So heterosexual people are trying to pull specks out of homosexuals' eyes but they have logs in theirs. I do not approve of the sin but I worry how many of the staunch opponents of it don't have skeletons in their cupboards. The whole world reels in sin: "For ALL have sinned and come short of the glory of God" (Rom. 3:23). Jesus died for all sinners and it's universal - the word WORLD is mentioned 3 times in John 3:16-19. He did not shed His Blood for only one set of sinners but for all. But the same scripture requests that everyone "come to the light" that is, seek forgiveness and show love. Let everyone who is in sin, homosexual or adultery, stealing, spousal cheating, hatred or anger, neglect of the poor, injustice, dishonoring of leaders, disrespect to parents and many many more... Let everyone turn from their evil ways and repent. That is the whole message of the Savior.

Tim Mills

commented on May 19, 2012

Great article. This will be very helpful in future sermons addressing sexuality.

David Jankowski

commented on May 21, 2012

Outstanding! I'll share this with our whole pastoral staff. We talked about this subject on a short trip we took, and these insights would have improved our conversation.

Ray Ivey

commented on May 21, 2012

Tom Martins comments: Jesus never mentioned Homosexuality" isn't good hermeneutical practice and blemishes preacher's abibility to "rightly divided" the word of truth, not to mention doesn't help the sinner (whatever the sin) to find freedom. Jesus completely and verbatum endorsed Gen. account of one man for one woman and called anything contrary to that as adultery. So in one sweeping endorsement he reaffirmed the defintion of marriage and its sacredness. Also, the same Spirit the breathed scripture (all of it, according to 2 Tim. 3:16) is the same Spirit that inspired the gospel writers, so certainly He wasn't fickled on the subject. If so, He (the Spirit) has misled us through Paul and Moses. Jesus never said anything about smoking Pot but clearly scripture would address it in other places, because the bible is a unity of message and purpose. Please don't use that argument of silence when Jesus knew others would certainly come after Him and write according to what the same Spirit spoke through Him. We help no one when we dumb down sin to accomodate our congregations. FYI...I have a recovering Homosexual group of about 60 who meets at our church and they are being set free...otherwise they would have left and never returned. Don't enslave them...set them free.

Koshy Verghese

commented on May 22, 2012

An excellent well balanced article.

Steven Farless

commented on Jun 9, 2012

just read the article: I appreciate your effort, and I understand your heart, and I tend to agree with you, and your insights are good. the problems is that preaching against sin is never soft peddled in the Bible; and whether we admit it or not, we have been conditioned to approach homosexuality cautiously out of fear and not compassion; unlike many other sins, homosexuality has become politically protected, and clinically revised into normalcy; it also has a well funded outreach/conversion program which is even accepted in public schools. we present less than a sincere effort if homosexuality is not challenged at preventive level as well as redemptive; as we do with illegal drugs or anything else.

Dr.w.samuel Legon

commented on Aug 26, 2013

We need to try to understand man is forever at war with the devil we need every tool we can get to fight every type of sin test us as preachers we must preach the word as it is in order to see people saved by the Grace of God .

Michael Dissmore

commented on Aug 9, 2014

Very well done. We tend to rail most fervently against the sins we don't struggle with or to hide the ones we do. Homosexuality has been a popular go to if you need to throw some red meat to the base. That will no longer work. According to LifeWay Research, 83 percent of unchurched millennials would not consider attending a church that condemns homosexuality. How then do we reach them? Love. Love as Jesus loved. He was a friend of sinners - all kinds. We must love the homosexual and those who love them.

Nom De Plume

commented on Aug 9, 2014

I'm afraid your sentiment misses the point Mr. Wilkins made by "Expound the Whole Counsel of God". It is important Christians convey a biblical definition of "love" and not a love defined by pop-culture and the world. Biblical love is never separated from scriptural truth; moreover, biblical love is concerned with a person's long-term well being as it relates to God and not their immediate happiness and comfort. I will hasten to add, however, that as one person once said, 'we ought not adorn the truth with hatred' either. Christians truly love the gay community and all lost sinners by clearly and faithfully communicating the gospel; highlighting the utter holiness of the Triune God in order that the love of God has actual meaning.

Bryant Holloway

commented on Aug 9, 2014

As a pastor myself, I have had the conversation on homosexuality with several gays. When I preach on homosexuality, I even tell the church that we still have to love everyone according to Scripture and the nature of The Father that we have taken on. One day I was thanking a neighbor of the church for allowing her children to come to a youth program when some friends of hers who are lesbians asked about the church. When I replied, they asked if we judged. My reply was that no one has the right to judge anyone.They then asked me my stance on homosexuality. When I responded in love to tell them the truth that Jesus died for our sins and that I have made mistakes and sinned, the one immediately shouted "I'm not a mistake" and stormed off. I apologized for any offence as they began to tell me how that I need to learn to accept this lifestyle. Several of my experiences tell me that they will get angry no matter the approach. Sometimes, any answer that they perceive of disagreement causes the defenses to go up. I will nonetheless continue to preach the Gospel and show them the love of Jesus that they might become born again. This article is a very good step forward though towards helping to understand the approach that should be taken on the subject of homosexuality. Thanks.

Ron Hietsch

commented on Aug 9, 2014

Jesus Christ came into the world to save sinners, even the worst of us, by His sacrifice on the cross. His desire is to deliver us from sin through repentance and faith not antinomianism and denial. He tells us many times that we are forgiven but He also tells us to stop sinning. He does not give us the luxury of claiming that our favorite sins are exempt from the Law.

Richard Scotland

commented on Aug 9, 2014

One of the best articles on the subject I have read. Thank you for writing and sharing your insights. There are also some very good comments below from others too.

Albert Francesca

commented on Aug 9, 2014

he writes 'When addressing homosexuality, preach on the healthy same-sex relationships revealed in Scripture?David and Jonathan, Paul and Timothy, i would NEVER in this confused world mention same sex relationships , but friendships. his message is good, i see his point, but as a pastor i am called to preach the word of God, confession and repentance is the key to true freedom

Leonidas Constable

commented on Aug 11, 2014

This is very sound to correct in this great article. It also reveals that these are not same-sex relationships as it sounds either. These true loving relationships of the people of God, are not to be associated with a hint that coveting of someone of the same sex is found in them or in any way associated with the present charged expression 'same-sex relationships'.

Jeff Law

commented on Aug 10, 2014

Tim, I liked a lot of what you had to say. Thank you for the article. The one thing I found exception to was your boundaries for sin as in it being confined to what is acted out in the body. You said this here, "Remember?it is not a sin to NOT be attracted to the opposite sex; it IS a sin to be involved in any form of sexual activity apart from the husband/wife relationship." - Sin is a condition of the heart. Sin is spiritual, so begins spiritually before it finalizes physically. Yes. It is a sin to lust after someone else. Even the 10 commandments state this in "You shall not covet." - I am not sure if you can see a diagram (picture) I made, but you can find it on my web site here: http://desiregood.com/images/desiregood.gif ... if that does not work or does not show, then reinterpret the following from written English to html code www (dot) desiregood (dot) com ... slash ... images .... slash desiregood (dot) gif - Thank you again for the honesty and clarity you presented of yourself in your article. It takes a lot of fortitude to come out in the way you did. :)

Jeff Law

commented on Aug 10, 2014

Between righteousness and sin there are iniquities and trespasses. Iniquities are where it is wrong to be attracted to the same sex. It is in that attraction that righteousness is skewed. No, it is not "sin" as in the sinful act of physically engaging in homosexual behavior, but it is the beginnings of sin. Sin can not take place without iniquity happening first. Iniquity means "unequal", and that inequality comes from a fault in judgment, else, a fault in being just. Being righteous in our desires means we are being on the straight way. That is what righteous means in its etymologies.

John Wallace Miller

commented on Aug 12, 2014

"The beginnings of sin?" Seems to me that sin is sin or it is not. Temptation is not a sin. The idea that "sin cannot take place without iniquity happening first" is illogical and inconsistent with Scripture. Sounds like a sin takes place before an actual sin.

Jeff Law

commented on Aug 14, 2014

Hi John, I see your point, in a way. ... Let's look at James 1:15 ... "Then when lust hath conceived, it bringeth forth sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death. " ... In this verse, the beginning of sin is lust, is it not? For without, lust, there is no sin, right? And, what is lust of the flesh ... "http://machaut.uchicago.edu/WEBSTER.sh?word=Lust" ... We can lust after the Spirit or we can lust after the flesh. To lust after the flesh is iniquity, because according your usage, it is not sin, yet without it, sin can not take place. Help me here with my logic, is this still not making sense?

Jeff Law

commented on Aug 14, 2014

Ah, OK. As per my image at http://desiregood.com/images/desiregood.gif, it seems you are saying that sin is unique and has no beginning or ending it is just sin. And, what I am saying is that iniquity comes before sin, so it is the beginning of sin. I suppose at the point of trespass, or as James 1:15 puts it, conception, then that is where sin begins. Is that what you are saying? ... I am looking at it like in the reverse too. Lust continues until death. It doesn't disappear when sin appears. That is what I am also saying about iniquity. It doesn't disappear when trespass appears. It is like this: First, there is iniquity. Second, there is iniquity and trespass. Third, there is iniquity, trespass, and sin. Fourth, there is iniquity, trespass, sin, and death. Each builds upon the foundation of the former. That is why I say iniquity is the beginnings of sin.

Ricky Dean Mauldin

commented on Jun 18, 2015

I hear you saying that we should confess temptation, though the word says resist temptation and confess sin. D. L. Moody - "I can't stop a bird from flying over my head, buty I don't have to let him build a nest in my hat".

Alan Wilson

commented on Aug 11, 2014

Tim, thank you so much for this article. I am a pastor and have a daughter that struggles with this issue. The hurt and pain that many in our congregations struggle with silently because of fear of the reaction that might come about is heartbreaking. We all have people in our congregations that struggle with this or have a family member that does and when we stand and carelessly attack we do more damage than good.

David Jennys

commented on Aug 11, 2014

Why do we continually make the mistake that assumes people struggling with homosexuality are not Christians? I personally know several committed followers of Christ who are gay or lesbian (not to mention transgendered and bi). The article makes a lot of good points that we need to spend our time loving people (of all types and walks of life) the same way that Christ did, and let God lead people to a deeper relationship with Godself; it is not for us so much to tell people how they should be living (which is the danger of legalism) but to mentor them to know God and God's ways and to allow the Spirit to lead them in how they should live.

Jeff Law

commented on Aug 14, 2014

Hi David Jennys ... you made a comment that contradicts itself. ... " it is not for us so much to tell people how they should be living (which is the danger of legalism) but to mentor them to know God and God's ways and to allow the Spirit to lead them in how they should live. " ... if you are mentoring a person whether in word or deed, you ARE TELLING them how they should live. If you are telling them how they should live and if that is in danger of legalism, then you are being legalistic in showing them how they "should" live. Do you see how you contradicted yourself? If legalism is showing purity through actions, then you have no basis to show anyone anything. Your witness is mute as well as your mentoring. Please do not confuse legalism with instruction because if instruction is legalism, then the Bible is legalism, and you have no basis to instruct anyone to read it because that is being legalistic.

Valerie Eastwood

commented on Aug 12, 2014

Homosexuality is NOT a sin, and not regarded as such by every Christian denomination. You do not speak for Christianity. Thank God. However, *I* cannot believe what I am reading here. So long, Sermon Central!

Jeff Law

commented on Aug 14, 2014

Valerie ... what is your scriptural basis for your comment that homosexuality is not a sin?

Jeff Law

commented on Aug 14, 2014

Valerie ... what is your scriptural basis for your comment that homosexuality is not a sin?

Steven Farless

commented on Aug 14, 2014

say what? homosexuality is not only a sin, but it's a serious sin. everything about homosexuality is based on a lie, contrary to nature, supported by arguments from silence. and clearly identified in the Bible. The church?s problem in preaching about homosexuality is not that we deal with the sin in an improper way, it's our taking heat for battling a false gospel being peddled to people trapped in the particular sin, and the evangelistic efforts of that false gospel. we are instructed to stand against false gospels and call it out. the problem today is that we lack the courage to do it.

Ricky Dean Mauldin

commented on Jun 18, 2015

Wow! The play you got on this one, Brother, tells me you were right where we needed you to be. Last week, I was dealing with the lie that Jesus never addressed homosexuality (he validated all the prophets who proscribed it). OT quotes, NT quote, but had to end up where you did - "as such were some of you". I was saved out of adultery. Another from substance abuse. Another from some other kind of sensuality, and Jesus set the captive free in each. Important part of this message. Thank you. Isn't it funny how it's always easier to confess someone ELSE's sin than our own?

Ricky Dean Mauldin

commented on Jun 18, 2015

SC - I just realized that I was commenting on a recycled article that must've been published 3 years ago. So I think I'm part of conversation but am not? What gives with that? I feel foolish...

Ricky Dean Mauldin

commented on Jun 18, 2015

SC - I just realized that I was commenting on a recycled article that must've been published 3 years ago. So I think I'm part of conversation but am not? What gives with that? I feel foolish...

Ricky Dean Mauldin

commented on Jun 18, 2015

SC - I just realized that I was commenting on a recycled article that must've been published 3 years ago. So I think I'm part of conversation but am not? What gives with that? I feel foolish...

Ricky Dean Mauldin

commented on Jun 18, 2015

I gues I am foolish...just realized I had saved the article as a resource and had inadvertently pulled it up. My apologies.

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