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Summary: Jesus often spoke in parables. He used common experiences such as fishing and farming in His parables to teach a valuable lesson. Baseball is a very common activity in our culture, so I would like to use it to illustrate the Christian life.

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Text: Mark 4:33-34

Introduction: Jesus often spoke in parables. He used common experiences such as fishing and farming in His parables to teach a valuable lesson. Baseball is a very common activity in our culture, so I would like to use it to illustrate the Christian life.

I. First Base - This is Salvation - John 3:3

A. In baseball when you are up to bat you want to at least get to first base.

B. The bad news in the Christian life is, you can’t get to first base on your own. You will strike out in sin.

C. The good news is you can have a pinch hitter, Jesus Christ.

D. He got you a hit at the cross, when He died for your sins.

II. Second Base -This is Baptism & Church Membership - Matthew 3:13-17 & Romans 6:4

A. Baptism affirms our faith that Jesus died for us.

B. You can’t be baptized and join the Church until you get saved.

C. You can’t advance to second base until you get to first base.

III. Third Base - This is Christian Service - Eph. 2:8-9

A. God wants us to serve Him but we don’t have to serve Him in order to get saved.

B. We serve better because we are saved.

IV. Home Plate – The Finished Job – Matthew 25:23a

A. The runs don’t count until you cross home plate.

B. Many only make it to home plate because someone else drove them in.

CONCLUSION:

In 1942, the New York Yankees and the Washington Senators played in the World Series. It was a very close series. At the end of six games it was tied at three games. The stadium was filled for the deciding game, played in Washington. They came to the ninth inning with the score tied at two. New York was put down in order and Washington came to bat. The home team screamed for one lone run which would win the series and the World Championship. The first two men made outs and it looked like extra innings. Then a player named Goslin came to the plate. Two strikes were called and then two balls. The crowd was watching every pitch. On the fifth pitch, Goslin stepped into the ball and slammed it to left center field. The crowd became delirious; it looked like a home run, but it hit six inches below the top of the wall and fell back into the playing field. Goslin was slowing down for a triple when the third base coach signaled him to try for an in field home run. He ran for home. The shortstop took the peg from left center, spinning to fire the ball to the catcher. Goslin slid into home in a cloud of dust, seemingly a split second before the tag. The umpire made a delayed call and finally as the dust cleared, he raised his right hand shouting, "You’re out!" The Washington fans were furious. Washington managers and players rushed out to argue the call. The umpire announced he would consult with the other umpires. After the four umpires conferred for a minute or two the umpire announced: "Ladies and gentlemen, the batter is out, because he didn’t touch first base!"


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Elizabeth Jensen

commented on Jun 13, 2009

The concluding story is powerful but inaccurate. The Yankees played the Cardinals in the 1942 series; the Yankees and the Senators were in the same league. Goslin played his last game in 1938.

Rick Sweney

commented on Jul 18, 2011

The above story MAY refer to the 1924 World Series. The New York Giants played the Washington Senators. The series went 7 games and was decided in the 12th inning of game seven. Goslin played.

David Rigg

commented on Mar 24, 2012

This story does appear to be false. Here''s what did happen in 1924:Game 6 was a duel of southpaws, as Tom Zachary bested Art Nehf 2-1, tying the Series and setting the stage for a Game 7 showdown. In the deciding contest, the Senators trailed 3-1 in the eighth, but remarkably tied the game when the ball struck a pebble and took a bad hop over the head of third baseman Fred Lindstrom. In the twelfth, with Walter Johnson on in relief, Muddy Ruel got another life when his foul pop was dropped by rival catcher Hank Gowdy, who tripped on his mask. Ruel promptly doubled -- then Johnson reached on an error. Next up, center fielder Earl McNeely grounded to third and remarkably another bad hop caromed, allowing Ruel to score the winning run and the Senators were victorious for their first ever world championship.

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