Sermons

Summary:

Main Idea: In order to bring about healing in the lives of others, we must first learn to become lovers of the

unlovable.

Introduction: Ted Stallard’s story

This morning, I want to tell you the story of Ted Stallard. A young man who was turned off by school. Very sloppy in appearance. Expressionless. Unattractive. Slow. Often times he would simply sit in class and stare off into space, unresponsive, which was an irritation to his teacher. Miss Thompson, enjoyed bearing down her red pen -- as she placed big red X’s beside his many wrong answers.

If only she had studied Ted’s school records more carefully. They read:

1st grade: Ted shows promise with his work and attitude, but (has) poor home situation.

2nd grade: Ted could do better. Mother seriously ill. Receives little help from home.

3rd grade: Ted is good boy but too serious. He is a slow learner. His mother died this year.

4th grade: Ted is very slow, but well-behaved. His father shows no interest whatsoever.

Christmas arrived. The children piled elaborately wrapped gifts on their teacher's desk. Ted brought one too. It was wrapped in brown paper and held together with Scotch Tape.

Miss Thompson opened each gift, as the children crowded around to watch. Out of Ted's package fell a gaudy rhinestone bracelet, with half of the stones missing, and a bottle of cheap perfume. The children began to snicker. But she silenced them by splashing some of the perfume on her wrist, and letting them smell it. She put the bracelet on too. At day's end, after the other children had left, Ted came by the teacher's desk and said, "Miss Thompson, you smell just like my mother. And the bracelet looks real pretty on you. I'm glad you like my presents." He left.

Miss Thompson got down on her knees and asked God to forgive her and to change her attitude. The next day, the children were greeted by a reformed teacher -- one committed to loving each of them. Especially the

slow ones. Especially Ted.

Surprisingly -- or maybe, not surprisingly, Ted began to show great improvement. He actually caught up with most of the students and even passed a few. Graduation came and went. Miss Thompson heard nothing

from Ted for a long time. Then, one day, she received this note:

Dear Miss Thompson:

I wanted you to be the first to know. I will be graduating second in my class.

Love, Ted

Four years later, another note arrived:

Dear Miss Thompson:

They just told me I will be graduating first in my class. I wanted you to be first to know. The university has not been easy, but I liked it.

Love, Ted

And four years later:

Dear Miss Thompson:

As of today, I am Theodore Stallard, M.D. How about that? I wanted you to be the first to know. I am getting married next month, the 27th to be exact. I want you to come and sit where my mother would sit if she were alive. You are the only family I have now; Dad died last year.

Love, Ted

Miss Thompson attended that wedding, and sat where Ted's mother would have sat. The compassion she had shown that young man entitled her to that privilege.

Every day we come in contact with people like Ted. However, for some, the hurt doesn’t always show on the

outside. Some people wear a mask to cover the invisible pain that exists just beneath the surface of their

lives.

It may be your next door neighbor - a member of your family - a spouse - a friend - the person sitting next to

you right now. It is that private pain that they live with every day: it eats away at their soul. The pain is often

caused by sin, and failure.

If we would only realize just how much healing we could bring about in the lives of these broken-hearted,

hurting people - those that the world, and sadly some Christians, call the unlovable - If we would only learn

to respond to their hurt with love and not condemnation, like Jesus did.

In order to bring about healing in their lives, first and foremost we must bring them to Jesus Christ - He

alone is the healer of invisible pain. In order to do that though we must first learn to become lovers of the

unlovable.

Today’s text bears witness that Jesus was a lover of the unlovable and calls us to do the same. Since He is

our example in all things we need to pay close attention to His leading.

I. Introduction

1. This woman - example of one who seemed to have it all together.

(1) If you would meet her on the street carrying her water pot you probably would not know anything about her.

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Sandra Leightner

commented on Jun 20, 2010

FYI ---The Teddy Stallard (also under name Ted Stoddard) story is not ture - it is a work of fiction -

B Pastor

commented on Mar 23, 2014

Must a story be true in order to carry great meaning? Look for the "Ted" in your life....

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