Sermons

Summary: Christ came to break the chains of sin and death!

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Sermon: "Chains Shall He Break" D Anderson

Is. 9:2-7; Titus 2:11-14; Luke 2:1-20

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The Lord Jesus once proclaimed of Himself,

"If the Son sets you free, you are free

indeed." Titus picks up on this when He

speaks of Christ’s journey to the Cradle, and

from the cradle to the cross. From Titus,

the second chapter, in Jesus name: “For the

grace of God that brings salvation has

appeared to all men.” (Titus 2:11 NIV)

RATTLE... RATTLE... CLANK.... CLANK....

CLANK...

EB-O-NEE-ZER SCROOGE!

With these horrifying sounds the candlelight

serenity of Ebenezer’s upper chamber was

shattered, and with it crumbled his

comfortable, pat view about life.

MOST EVERYBODY HAS SEEN AT LEAST ONE VERSION

OF THE CHRISTMAS CAROL. Already this year I

have seen the Muppet version, and just last

Sunday, I saw it presented again at the

Gutherie Theater.

The Christmas Carol has become synonymous

with this time of the year. We all feel good

after we experience it, written or presented,

and yet..... WHY?

LET’S LOOK AT THIS work by Charles Dickens,

and see what it has to say about the true

meaning of Christmas.

The central figure of The Christmas Carol is

Ebenezer Scrooge... His very name "scrooge"

stands for the worst in human selfishness.

Just look at old Scrooge at the beginning of

the story:

--> This man was materialistic. His

life... ALL LIFE!... measured its

worth on a profit and loss sheet.

--> Scrooge was selfish-- He wasn’t

concerned for the poor and

orphaned, only the building of

his financial empire.

--> And miserly!-- Making money,

money, money was his only

motivation.

--> AND WITH MISERLY, CAME STINGY! He

would count the coals used at the

office, caring little that Bob

Cratchet was cold and miserable.

--> Ebenezer Scrooge was joyless--

BAH! HUMBUG! to everything bright,

beautiful, and festive.

--> This old, crotchety fellow was

harsh! His own and only nephew

was verbally assaulted and almost

roasted out of Scrooge’s office.

--> Amid all his wealth, he lived a

spartan life in the servant’s

quarters of his mansion.

To sum it all up Scrooge was driven to

accumulate wealth, and considered the world a

cold, hard place which worked according to

the survival of the fittest. “LET the

poor and orphans die, and decrees the

worlds surplus population!”--he was

analytic with figures, even to the point of

death.

SHAME ON EBENEZER SCROOGE! SHAME ON THAT

MATERIALISTIC, TIGHT, COLD HEARTED MAN!

And yet, if we peel beneath the veneers of

our own lives, don’t many of us see the face

of the crotchety old materialist? How many

of us here today are using our time, talents

and treasures to build the Kingdom of God in

the world, and how many of us our building

our own kingdoms in the world!

Scrooge was building his kingdom-- Bah Humbug

to any other greater reality, but then came

the rattling and the clanking of heavy chains

and metal money boxes.

Scrooge is confronted with a world bigger

than his money making and selfish living.

The presentation of The Christmas Carol at

the Guthrie this year had Scrooge making some

comical remarks as he tried to settle into

his servant’s quarters for the night. Cracks


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