Improve your sermon prep with our brand new study tools! Learn all about them here.
Sermons

Summary: This Christmas Eve sermon (with visitors and seekers in mind) encourages people to see that Jesus is for everyone. God sent Jesus for you!

  Study Tools

This week, as I have been reading Luke’s account of the birth of Jesus, I’ve found myself needing to put together some kind of a disclaimer. The draft version goes something like this:

Concerning the birth of Jesus! If you are expecting to hear a message about a beautiful, pregnant young white girl, wearing a mystical blue dress, travelling gracefully on a donkey to Bethlehem, where an inn keeper offers a stable as all the rooms are taken, where Mary quietly gives birth to a little boy who never cries and wears a shining halo, with beautiful winged angels singing soft lullabies in the background, clean-shaven shepherds bringing a new born lamb as a gift for the baby, donkeys looking on lovingly, in a freshly swept, squeaky clean room with a Christmas tree in the corner, and snow falling outside …then you may be disappointed.

When it comes to the birth of Jesus, and what we read in the Bible, I find myself wanting to say, “Handle with care!”

Handle with care, because we otherwise end up with a Christmas event which is almost completely divorced from what really happened!

So what did happen then? And what still happens now?

1: The involvement of God in human history. On the face of it we have ‘Caesar Augustus [issuing] a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world.’ And we have Joseph and his pregnant wife-to-be, Mary, setting off from Nazareth on the 85 mile trip to Bethlehem. Ladies, I have for you here a free voucher, entitling you to a fully accompanied 85 mile walk, from Southampton to London. Basic accommodation will be provided upon your arrival in London. The only condition is that you have to do the 85 mile walk whilst you are 8 months pregnant! How does that sound to you?

You might be thinking – OK, yes, so Caesar ordered a census, Mary and Joseph travelled to Bethlehem, and next …came the birth of Jesus.

But what I would like us to do is to stop …and consider the fact that God brought this event – this sequence of events – into being.

Caesar was considered to be the most powerful man alive. He insisted that people refer to him as ‘Lord’ and ‘Saviour’. Interesting then that later, the angels should announce that Jesus will be ‘Saviour’ and ‘Lord’! Caesar decides he wants everyone to register – probably for taxation purposes. And God uses this action of a pagan Roman emperor to ensure that Joseph and Mary end up in Bethlehem at just the right time! They were residents of Nazareth 85 miles away, but they had to end up in Bethlehem for the Old Testament prophecy to be fulfilled, that the Messiah, the saviour, would be born in Bethlehem. And we read that Joseph had to travel to Bethlehem because he was a descendant of King David, who himself was born in Bethlehem.

At face value the Roman census is the action of a mighty emperor, but what we see is the involvement of God in human history – God using a census for his higher purposes!

But that was then. What about now?

It may help to cast your mind back over this last year, or over the time that has elapsed since you moved to your current home, or the time that has elapsed since you got married, or since you became a parent …or for some of you, to cast your mind back over what has happened to you since the death of a loved one.


Browse All Media

Related Media


Christmas Eve 1
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Christmas Eve 2
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion