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Summary: A call to communion

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II Cor. 11:23-29

Communion is a time to:

Remember: “The Master Jesus, on the night of His betrayal, took bread. Having given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body, broken for you. Do this to remember me.” After supper, he did the same thing with the cup: “This is my blood, my new covenant with you. Each time you drink this cup remember me.”

A. Jesus Interpreted something old: Passover

Passover is celebrated every year by those in the Jewish community. I have participated in at least 5 or 6 Passover dinners in my life. Because of an association with a Jewish family in the city of Cincinnati during my college days I was a part of the Seder dinner each year. Everything is symbolic and done to remember the plight of the Jewish people and how God delivered them and led them out of bondage and to the promised land. Each Seder dinner ends with the line, next year in Jerusalem. Jesus was celebrating Passover with his disciples when He took the dinner to a whole new level.

B. Jesus Interpreted something new: Communion

Jesus began to use the bread and the cup to talk about remembering what He was about to do at the cross. When Jesus broke the bread and held up the cup and referred to his broken body and the blood He would shed, He made a covenant with us.

The Lord’s supper is a memorial meal. When we take communion we are remembering Jesus’ death for our sins.

Let us pause for a moment and remember the death of our Savior.

Rejoice: “What you must solemnly realize is that every time you eat this bread and every time you drink this cup, you reenact in your words and actions the death of the Master. You will be drawn back to this meal again and again until the Master returns.”

Communion is not just about looking back. It is about looking forward. NIV “. . .we proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.”

There should be a spirit of rejoicing that accompanies this act. We are celebrating and proclaiming His death and power to change lives until He comes back. In a way we can say with those of the Jewish faith, not next year in Jerusalem but next year with our Lord. We look forward to the day when we celebrate this act of communion with Jesus at the head of the table.

Years ago, before fathers were allowed in delivery rooms, a young father-to-be was pacing back and forth, nervously wringing his hands in the hospital waiting room while his wife was in labor. Finally, a nurse opened the door and said, "Well, sir, you have a little girl." He heaved a sigh of relief and said, "Thank God it’s a girl. She’ll never have to go through the agony I’ve gone through tonight!"

We need to focus our rejoicing and make sure it is on the right thing. We rejoice in this act of communion because we wait for the return of our risen Lord.

Let us take a moment for private rejoicing and thanksgiving to God.

Repent: “Anyone who eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Master irreverently is like part of the crowd that jeered and spit on him at his death. Is that the kind of remembrance you want to be part of? Examine your motives, test you heart, come to this meal in holy awe.”


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