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Summary: Miles of distance and centuries of time separate us from King David. He was a king and we are commoners. Still, despite the distance and the differences we can learn much about being fathers in this present day by looking at this father of long ago.

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Disclaimer Please note that all my sermons come from the Lord. But I get my info from many sources from my library and other sources. I do not claim all material as my originality. I don’t quote all sources but I give credit to the Lord who is the author of all sermons. “All originality and no plagiarism makes for dull preaching" Charles Spurgeon

LESSONS FROM A FAMOUS FATHER

2 Samuel 18:33

Introduction

Miles of distance and centuries of time separate us from King David. He was a king and we are commoners. Still, despite the distance and the differences we can learn much about being fathers in this present day by looking at this father of long ago.

I. Here Is a Cry of Grief.

A. Absalom was a handsome and gifted son.

B. David loved him dearly, even though David had many sons.

C. David loved him dearly, even though Absalom had committed serious sins.

D. David loved him dearly even though Absalom had tried to take the throne from his father.

E. A father’s love is never conditioned on the child’s conduct.

F. David’s grief is not lessened by the events that preceded it, nor by Absalom’s bad character. In fact, his grief may be even greater because of it.

II. Here Is a Cry of Failure.

A. David had been immensely successful in most of the things he had done.

1. He had been successful as a musician.

2. He had been successful as a soldier.

3. He had been successful as an administrator.

4. He had been successful as a politician.

B. David failed as a father and that outweighed all his successes.

1. In fact, David would gladly have given up his other successes if he could have traded them for success as a father.

2. Many today give up success as a father and trade it for success in business or a profession.

C. David’s failures, though, must be seen in true perspective.

1. Fathers must accept some responsibility for the character of their children They have a responsibility to set a good example, and to teach moral values.

2. Fathers must not accept full responsibility for the character of their children. There are other influences that enter every life. Also, it must be remembered that every person is a free moral agent. Some fathers are carrying a load of guilt they do not need to carry.

III. Here Is a Cry of Futility.

A. David could not die for his son.

1. A father can die for his child in the sense that he can die to protect the child. Most fathers would willingly do that.

2. A father cannot die for his child in the sense that the father’s dying will keep the child from ever facing death. All of us must die.

B. The Lord Jesus Christ could and did die for us.

1. Romans 5:6; 5:18; 1 Corinthians 15:3, 22; Romans 6:8.

2. We still have to suffer physical death, but it has lost its sting (1 Corinthians 15:54-56).

3. We do not have to suffer the death that is the wages of sin (Romans 6:23; 8:1).

Conclusion

While we learn much that is helpful from the example of David, we learn the most from the example of God. It is very important to remember that in the Bible God is described as a Father. God represents fatherhood at its very best.


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