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Summary: Part 5 in the series Freedom From., Dave takes on lust, explaining how it operates to damage our relationships.

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Freedom From Lust

Freedom From... prt. 5

Wildwind Community Church

David Flowers

September 27, 2009

We're going into part 5 of our Freedom From... series and this morning I want to talk to you about Lust. Now I chose this video this morning not because it deals with pornography, but mostly because it accurately depicts the way our lustful feelings, and many of our lustful behaviors, are shrouded in secrecy. It shows the attempts we make to gloss over our lust - to hide it from others, and put on a good public front. Whether it is sexual lust, like that which was shown in the video, emotional lust, like that which so many women harbor in their hearts, or lust for money, or power, lust often carries with it this element of secrecy. We're lusting on the sly.

But what exactly is lust?

Lust is:

1.intense sexual desire or appetite.

2.uncontrolled or illicit sexual desire or appetite; lecherousness.

3.a passionate or overmastering desire or craving (usually fol. by for): a lust for power.

(Source: Dictionary.com)

For the purposes of this message today, I'm going to talk about lust in terms of human relationships. We won't talk directly about lust for money and power and those kinds of things.

Having defined what lust is, let's set it in proper context this morning, so we understand why a person who is setting forth to live a godly life cannot continue to entertain lust. First there is nothing whatsoever wrong with lust under the first definition. There is no prescribed amount of sexual desire we are to have, and of course such a prescription would be ridiculous, as none of us have a whole lot of control over how much sexual desire we have. Some of us have a ton of desire and wish we had even more. Some of us have very little desire and are fine with that. Some of us have a ton and have significant others who wish we had less. And of course a very common problem is when one partner has a higher level of desire than the other and wishes the other person would be willing to have sex more often. But having a high level of sexual desire in itself is neutral. Desire is a feeling - it is an emotion. It is simply something we experience. But the concern with lust lies in its intensity, because its intensity is what gives it the ability it can have to rule over us. Definition #2 uses the words "uncontrolled," and "illicit," and definition #3 uses the word "overmastering." It is here that lust becomes a problem for the person who wants to be faithful in walking the way Jesus walked. In the book of Hebrews we see this about Jesus:

Hebrews 4:15 (NIV)

15 ...we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are--yet was without sin.

From this passage we can understand that Jesus experienced sexual desire. He has experienced the temptations we all face. And yet for Jesus, these temptations -- these desires -- did not lead to sin.

And that is our great challenge, is it not? To be human, to experience sexual desire, perhaps very intense sexual desire, but to express it in ways that are appropriate to our station in life. To be tempted, but sin not.


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