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Summary: Christ is better

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This sermon is a rough draft and a work in progress. It was last updated July 28, 2012.

There’s a lot of discussion about who authored Hebrews, and I think that’s kind of ironic because the book is about how Jesus is better than all things. I think by leaving that part blank it just highlights that Jesus is even greater than the writer. He’s better than the angels, better than creation, better than Moses, better than the tabernacle, better than the priests, you know, He’s better than everything. Even when we read about all the men and women of great faith in chapter 11, it tells us in chapter 12 that Jesus is the author and finisher of our faith. So, He’s better than Abraham and Adam and David and all the men and women at any time in history. And the author doesn’t even waste time telling us anything else; he just jumps right in with that thought:

God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, 2Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son,

From Adam to Malachi we read about how God spoke to His people through the mouths of prophets. Some of those men were distinctively great. Enoch and Elijah were translated into heaven. I mean, you don’t get any better than that, right? Moses delivered the Law. Abraham is called the father of the faith, but this writer sort of lumps them all into one big heap and says, “God used to speak to us by them, but now we have His own Son.” The only one who really deserves distinction is Christ who is the ultimate Prophet and Apostle. This is the One,

whom he hath appointed heir of all things,

What does this verse mean? Look at this verse: “For the law maketh men high priests which have infirmity; but the word of the oath, which was since the law, maketh the Son, who is consecrated for evermore” (Hebrews 7:28). “Maketh” means to appoint. The law appointed sinful priests to carry out God’s purposes, but the word of the oath appointed the Son who is consecrated (perfect) forevermore. Okay, he says it’s “by the word of the oath.” What does that mean? Go to Psalm 110:

The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool. 2The Lord shall send the rod of thy strength out of Zion: rule thou in the midst of thine enemies. 3Thy people shall be willing in the day of thy power, in the beauties of holiness from the womb of the morning: thou hast the dew of thy youth. 4The Lord hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek. 5The Lord at thy right hand shall strike through kings in the day of his wrath. 6He shall judge among the heathen, he shall fill the places with the dead bodies; he shall wound the heads over many countries. 7He shall drink of the brook in the way: therefore shall he lift up the head.

The Father makes an oath to the Son—“You are My Priest forever.” And the language of this Psalm is so rich. It shows Jesus Christ existing even before His incarnation “in the beauties of holiness.” And “from the womb of the morning” that is, from the beginning of creation He has been beautifully holy. “Thou hast the dew of thy youth;” He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. And so His people are willing to submit to Him as King and Priest. And of course His enemies hate Him, but He’s the heir of all things: “The Lord shall send the rod of thy strength out of Zion: rule thou in the midst of thine enemies.” “He shall judge among the heathen, he shall fill the places with the dead bodies; he shall wound the heads over many countries.”


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