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Summary: This sermon walks through the 5 steps toward actually forgiving someone.

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Last week we spoke of why to forgive [see sermon “Why In The World Should I Forgive, Anyway?”]. Quickly on the heels of that question, though, comes the equally difficult question of how you forgive.

We all understand the general concept of forgiveness, but most of us are not especially proficient on the specifics on how to do it. So, this morning, we’re going to answer the questions: How do I forgive him? How do I forgive her? (As I said that you thought of who that ‘him’ or ‘her’ is in your life).

As we begin our study this morning, let me acknowledge my debt to the various writings of Lewis Smedes for many of the concepts that undergird this sermon.

How Do I Forgive Him? How Do I Forgive Her?

1. Acknowledge that you have been seriously hurt.

- The starting point for being pursuing forgiveness is to admit that you’ve really been hurt. We like to pretend like what he said didn’t really bother us or what she did didn’t even phase us, but until we are willing to admit that we were hurt by them, we’re not in a place where we can begin to pursue forgiveness.

- There are many incidents in life that are not candidates for forgiveness - things like minor

disappointments or passing slights. Situations that require forgiveness are ones where the pain inflicted is personal, unfair, and deep. Things like betrayal and brutality (physical or emotional) come to mind.

- At this point, as we hurt, we are likely to find some hatred in our heart. Hatred, of course, is never a good thing, but we must be careful that we don’t try to get rid of it by covering it up. When we find that hate in our heart, that’s simply a sign we’re going to need to forgive.

2. Surrender your right to get even.

- The mother ran into the bedroom when she heard her seven-year-old son scream. She found his two-year-old sister pulling his hair. She gently released the little girl’s grip and said comfortingly to the boy, "There, there. She didn’t mean it. She doesn’t know that hurts." He nodded his acknowledgement, and she left the room.

As she started down the hall the little girl screamed. Rushing back in, she asked, "What happened?"

The little boy replied, "She knows now."

[source: www.preachingtoday.com]

- Few would dispute our right to get even. The rule of the world is ‘do unto others as they’ve done unto you.’

- When we choose to forgive, though, we choose to lay aside our right to extract our revenge. In the moment of making that decision, we are doing a couple of things: 1. We are leaving ultimate justice and vengeance to God, and 2. We are deliberately choosing for ourselves the path of forgiveness.

This is the first step down a different path.

Acknowledging that we have been hurt gets in the right place to begin, but surrendering our right to get even is the first step down the path.

- Some would argue that choosing such a path is inevitably going to make us a patsy - we’re yielding all our power and are going to end up as a doormat. I believe, though, that there is a power that is unleashed in this decision that cannot come from any other source. What does this power look like? Consider the following story:


Talk about it...

Jim Brennan

commented on Oct 6, 2006

Excellent Sermon, structure is sound and content is right on. Thank you for sharing your thoughts, you have been a blessing.

Jonathan Zane Findley

commented on May 1, 2011

I feel that forgiving those that do not know what they are doing is far more easy than forgiving those that do know what they are doing. Ignorance, for me is relatively easy to forgive. But blatant disregard for society for personal gain, is something I need help with. Is there anyone that can help me learn how to forgive such situations? thank you, Jon

Jonathan Zane Findley

commented on May 1, 2011

I feel that forgiving those that do not know what they are doing is far more easy than forgiving those that do know what they are doing. Ignorance, for me is relatively easy to forgive. But blatant disregard for society for personal gain, is something I need help with. Is there anyone that can help me learn how to forgive such situations? thank you, Jon

Jim Russell

commented on Aug 27, 2011

Jesus came under fire from the Pharisees because He forgave when only God could forgive. This sermon is right on. Judgement is up to God, not us. We forgive and leave it up to God, as difficult as it sometimes is.

Jerry Colter

commented on Apr 25, 2012

Jonathan, it may appear that people know what they are doing, but deep down in their heart they are trapped in unbelief. They really don''t understand the consequences of their actions to others, themselves, God and His kingdom. Their entrapment usually is the result of scars left by injustices done to them. It really takes the help of the Holy Spirit to see into them.

Afiong Maurice

commented on Aug 27, 2012

Most times people intentionally hurt others just to come back and say "i''m sorry", expecting the victim to forgive speedily otherwise the victim become hard-hearted. let us be mindful of what we do to others and most importantly, do to others what you would have them do for you. But if one is wronged let him remember that forgiveness is a DECISION.

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